UHF repeaters

Submitted: Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1161 Views:3362 Replies:7 FollowUps:2
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I'm fairly new to this subject and have a couple of questions.
1..What is a repeater, does it have a physical presence, is it manned, does it requuire a person to operate it?
2..Can one transfer messages via this facility to other repeaters and ultimately to a destination?
3..Can it be used like a normal two way radio? Conversations carried on for several moments?
4..Is it wise to NOT use these channels (1-8) in normal everyday radio use?
5..What is Sellcall and how does this work?
6..Maybe EXploroz can do its next monthly school lesson on this!!!!!!
TIA Andrew
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Reply By: Slunnie - Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00
Hey Andrew,
A repeater picks up the radio signal from your UHF and retransmits this with a lot more power, and over a greater distance than what the radio would do by itself. Repeaters work when you have selected duplex on the radio, which causes it to transmit 30 stations over that selected. Eg Ch1 on duplex will receive on Ch1 but transmit on Ch31, Ch2 receives on Ch2 but transmits on Ch32 and so on. The repeaters are channel specific, so they will only receive 1 channel and transmit on 1 channel. Eg. the Hurstville repeater in Sydney only recieves Ch31 and only transmits on Ch1. (I can pick up and transmit to this Sydney repeater with a handheld out at Katoomba).When the radio is set to simplex (instead of duplex) it transmits and receives on the same channel and works like a normal 2 way radio. The repeaters are usually located in regional high spots, as UHF's work best on the line of sight principle.The other thing it is useful foris transmitting to the other sides of hilly terrain. Repeaters are not set up to, and do not transmit to each other at all. In terms of use Ch1-8 (duplex channels) will transmit to a massive number of people, so day to day conversation may be difficult on these channels. They seem to be more chat type channels.
AnswerID: 3640

Follow Up By: Nigel - Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00
Repeaters are normally only licensed to 5 watt output, the same as a normal UHF radio. The advantage comes from their elevated position.
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FollowupID: 1494

Reply By: Nigel - Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, May 18, 2002 at 00:00
Repeater are not manned, but automated radios that simply repeat a signal in real time. You access them via the duplex function on your radio (ie channel 1 duplex really transmits to the repeater on channel 31 but still receives on channel 1).

Repeater are not linked and cannot pass messages. Your radio works in the same way as far as conversations go when you use a repeater except that you can talk over greater distances.

Selcall is similar to dialling a phone number - you send a call to the number of the radio you want via tones. Only the more expensive sets feature selcall.

You should avoid channels 1-8 in the areas where they are used unless you have them in duplex mode. More importantly avoid channels 31-38 as simplex conversations on those channels will be rebroadcast on channels 1-8 if a repeater is in range.
AnswerID: 3642

Reply By: Ed B - Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00
TKS Slunnie and Nigel, you have clarified a couple of points for me too, Ed B
AnswerID: 3647

Reply By: Bill - Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00
Lots of good info there!! Just one thing to add - when I turn my set on the display shows my selcall number for 5 seconds. Yours may do the same. That's the number you give other people with selcall in order that they can call you personally - similar as others have said to calling on a phone.
AnswerID: 3652

Reply By: Nigel - Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00
With regards to Bills post, my GME TX4400 shows the selcall number on powerup, but my older TX4200 doesn't. If you have a GME you call tell if it has selcall ability as it will have a call button on the top of the mic. If you have a GME TX4200 you can find out your selcall number by pressing the call button on the mic then press the squelch button. It will then display your selcall number. This may work on other models too.
AnswerID: 3654

Reply By: Guy - Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, May 19, 2002 at 00:00
Since 2001 the UHF channels 21 and 22 are reserved to data communication. Np voice should be transmuitted on 21 and 22.
Actually it is used for farmers in the outback/remote to monitor/control theri water pumps. This is the primary use but it
can be used for other purposes using data transmissions.
Guy
AnswerID: 3657

Reply By: Andrew Donald - Monday, May 20, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, May 20, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks to every one. This sort of response shows the value of a forum like this. Goes to show how much collective stored info is out there. What'd we do before the internet? Long live positive replies.
AnswerID: 3676

Follow Up By: Jim-e - Monday, May 20, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, May 20, 2002 at 00:00
What a good question and even better replies. I have printed the whole lot out and will add the info to my ever expanding travel file - great that others are willing to pass on such usefull information on this great forum. Cheers
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FollowupID: 1519

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