Which one would you choose?

Submitted: Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:03
ThreadID: 131080 Views:3190 Replies:20 FollowUps:39
This Thread has been Archived
Hello all,

Trifor Hand winch or a set of Maxtrak. If you had to choose ONE out of these two items as part of your equipment for when you travel offroad, which one would it be and why?

Just curious as i can see positive and negatives for both.

e.g winch is good if you have something to attach it to(i guess you can always bury a spare and attach)
Maxtrax if your stuck in a water crossing may not be much help.

Look forward to hearing your choice.
Gazza

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:26

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:26
No question in my mind, Maxtrax or similar. I've survived for many years without a clunking heavy Tirfor.
AnswerID: 593566

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:54

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:54
x 2
0
FollowupID: 861849

Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:29

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:29
if we are sticking to the 2 options only I would have the Maxtrax.

The trifor hand winches are not all that user friendly.

It will be interesting to see where this thread goes from here.

Cheers
AnswerID: 593567

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:30

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:30
Let's put it this way.............. you are bogged on the beach, the tide is coming in and there is not another car in sight. Will you struggle to get the Tirfor out and set it up then get the spare out and start digging a deep hole to bury it......... or will you just lift the MaxTrax down and shove them under the wheels and drive out?

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 593568

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:32

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 18:32
Oh, and you had better be under 30yo or the Tirfor will bring on a heart attack. lol
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 861830

Follow Up By: Zippo - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:14

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:14
And in that scenario you'd better hope the spare isn't UNDER the vehicle (as some are) or digging IT out is the first task.
2
FollowupID: 861844

Reply By: DaveO*ST-R - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:06

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:06
Sold my hand winch some time ago - too heavy and bulky to cart around, too old to be using it if stuck anywhere - they are hard work. Would not leave home without my Maxtrax !!! They have got me out of strife more than once.
AnswerID: 593571

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:14

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:14
I chose the Maxtrax

Was bogged on the beach near Robe SA a few years back and the tide was coming in.
Luckily I had mobile coverage and contacted a tower to come and get me out.
Cost - $300

Since bought a pair of MaxTrax for $275 and have never had to use them since. Cheap insurance I reckon.

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 593572

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:53

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:53
Mate, the same happened to me just north of Beachport. The beach was so soft I was coming off the Maxtrax and sinking straight away again. I've never seen sand so soft. I was lucky, the SES from Millicent winched me out but they had to use 2 winch extension straps as their Troopy couldn't get close either. It only cost me a case of beer for the crew. I would have karked it trying to do it with a Tirfor. :-)
1
FollowupID: 861854

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 23:27

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 23:27
Can be fun in there when soft hey ?
I have run 8psi down there once or twice, and seen people letting ALL their air out to get short distances off beaches.

First time I ever drove a beach I hit Erringtons (south border of Little Dip Nat Pk) and promptly got bogged, but the Max got me straight out and got back up high, had only gone down a little to see if firmer, big mistake with that angled beach.

Good thing I got out so easy too, with the missus sitting next to me and, well let's just say she's not a beach person, especially in a 4WD !!

Little Dip just over the next point is also a bit soft sometimes too.
0
FollowupID: 861857

Reply By: Hoyks - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:15

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:15
Where do you go driving?

Desert/sand, then the tracks are a clear winner. Using a hand winch in soft sand is never much good, I tried it twice; the vehicle was a better ground anchor than I could build with a shovel and a spare tyre. The second time I ran out of straps before I could get to a tree.

In the mountains or mud, then I'd be inclined to go with the tirfor. With one of those you can pull forward, backwards or sideways, pull trees off the track, pull yourself back on, lower yourself down steep hills or skull drag a dead vehicle off a rock or out of a creek. They also work well on trailers.

I can see the merit of maxtrax (or equivalent), but I have never used them myself. I have done a lot of beach/sand km and have only "failed to proceed" a hand full of times due to driver error, all those times I have pushed, snatched or dug my way out. I find that being conservative with tyre pressures and airing down early sees you drive most things reasonably easily and reading the sand helps a lot. Most maxtrax fitted to vehicles are more badges of honour and will rarely be used, but at least they will work as advertised, unlike the winches on every 3rd forbie that probably never get serviced.
AnswerID: 593573

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:41

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:41
Hi Hoyks.

Would you also call a first aid kit a "badge of honour"?
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861867

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:56

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:56
..
Indeed a set of Maxtrax are one of the few things like a first aid kit you don't want to use, might not need to use, but if needed it's invaluable, saves a lot of digging, and time.

Great moreso for helping others quickly and efficiently.

I have used them often on beach trips, never of desert trips, and know now what trips to take them on.

I dislike seeing then on 4B roofs around town though, even though Max are using good UV stabilised plastic, they will deteriorate and get weak with time, when not in use mine are in the cool shade on shelf under the carport, safe from the effects of the sun.
For a 2 or 3 week trip, no probs on the roof, or get a storage bag for long tours.
0
FollowupID: 861872

Follow Up By: Hoyks - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:00

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:00
No I wouldn't, but I also wouldn't strap it on the outside of my immaculately clean vehicle just in case I need it for my daily run to work or trip to the shops.


My first aid kit is behind the back seat and is hardly in the same class.
0
FollowupID: 861926

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 18:02

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 18:02
Well Hoyks, MaxTrax are very much like a first aid kit...... ready for use when things go 'pear-shaped'.
It seems a depreciating generalisation of yours to suggest they are "badges of honour"
And where would you expect the MaxTrax to be carried? Behind the front seat?
Mine are where they can fit and be accessed easily.... on the side of the roof rack.
Perhaps if I drove an "immaculately clean vehicle" then I would not wish to spoil my image but my "Badge of Honour" is a functional and grubby Troopy. lol

As it happens, mine have only been used twice, and then on other people's vehicles. I turfed out the hi-lift jack (which was hidden inside, lol) but consider the MaxTrax good insurance.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 861929

Follow Up By: Hoyks - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 21:46

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 21:46
you Sir, are a knob.

I have a first aid kit, home made recovery boards, a hand winch, numerous recovery straps and shackles, but apart from the first aid kit and 1 snatch strap, I don't carry them all the time. I haven't required them at Woolies or in my carpark at work, so have no need to carry the extra weight around or subject the plastic perishable items to UV for 10 hours a day for no reason.
0
FollowupID: 861937

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:20

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 19:20
..
Not sure where you are Gazza, but if you do beaches Maxtrax hands down.
Have saved me (and quite a few more others vehicles) several times down on the very soft Coorong / Limestone Coast beaches.

Funny enough, have taken them on a few Simmo crossings, but never needed them in that sand.
So, I don't take Max with me every trip, just beaches.

You mentioned water crossings ?
Hands down snatch strap (pre fitted), and of course a mate to tow you out, failing the available assistance the most practical way out is electric winch, that means a decent winch bar etc, so maybe stick to what's within the vehicle / drivers sure capabilities there, and hook up wiht another vehicle or two for those sorts of trips.

I have a brand new trifor, never needed (or used !), if you're in SA make me an offer !!
Would be useful if no other means in high country etc, or as a back up / keep vehicle stable of slope, etc.
AnswerID: 593574

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 20:54

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 20:54
Hi Gazza

Each to their own and I have owned MaxTrax for years.

I will now ask what you would do in this situation. No one ever wants to get into situations like this, but look seriously at the photos. What they do not show is that the distance in front of the car is the same as the rear, so where could you set the winch up?

The mud was over 30cc deep and you can guess the rest.

So now you answer your own question........do you buy a winch or MaxTrax???????



Cheers



Stephen





Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 593581

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:01

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:01
..
Jeez, almost looking at buying a new rig mate !!

I'd drive around that if possible for sure (but I know how big clay pans can be sometimes !!).
Looks like you had less to go forward than back, maxxing out forwards, hey ?

Is that a really green simmo ? east side WAA ?
Looks too green, but who knows, might have been a good year.
1
FollowupID: 861843

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:47

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:47
Hi Les

I should have known better. It was the French Line west of Poeppel Corner. It was August 2010 and the Simpson had not looked so good in years, and the Wildflowers were just unreal.

We have done the Simpson countless times and the detour would have been around 30 kilometres.

We had crossed around 4 large claypans prior to this one with no problem up until then. I have to admit I hate mud with a passion, give me sand any day. My intended route was to go to the south of this mud patch and things we're going ok, until the car wanted to follow a more deeper track slightly to the north. As you know with mud, it was the railroad effect, and has hard as I tried to get the car on track, the further into that mud trap I was getting, with the end results.

Like I said above, the detour would have been around 30 kilometres and if I was in that very same situation again, I would take the detour no questions asked. All I can say that if I never had the Maxtrax, it would have been very different, in fact I may have never become bogged, as I would not have taken any chances at all, especially travelling solo.



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861846

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:05

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:05
Oh yeah, think I know the detour and it's quite commonly used when it's wet out there.
You did well to Max out of that, would have taken ages I'm sure, but at least you go there !!

Was there a bit of traffic out there ?
Did any others come by and see you, ask if you were ok, or did they detour possibly without seeing you ?

It would be a big ask for someone to come out there and move tracks for you, but hopefully using the front setup you got enough get up and go to get the back tyres onto the tracks for a second push ??
0
FollowupID: 861850

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:33

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:33
Hi Les

There was not a lot of traffic and after 2 hours a vehicle came to our help. I was not going to miss the offer of help and over the radio, advised the guy which track to take. With our rate of MaxTraxing, it the vehicle never came along, I estimated that it would have taken me around another 4 hours and we would have been out.

If I had 2 sets of MaxTrax, it would have made the biggest difference, and I would most likely have been able to get out a lot quicker than I did.

Seeing the mud was so deep, I was only able to get the length of the MaxTrax before it would sink down again, then it was more digging, Maxtrax in place and then a little bit closer to more solid mud.

Even when the kind offer of help arrived, I was then lucky that I carried 2 snatch straps and an equalising strap, as well as rated shackles, as they did not have any.

Here are a few more images of digging out the mud, and when the help arrived...LOL




Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861865

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:43

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:43
..
Best uniform for mud like that !
Not sure if I'd ever bother to carry Wellingtons in the vehicle like your assistant, would be handy but can often get stuck and just pull right off.

So in the end he got in front and you got a snatch forward back onto decent track ?

It looks like you were still pretty close to the side you were heading to when you got stuck first up, I think I would have maxxed back to be honest and done the detour, but when you're in that situation you don't often think practically, maybe there were other issues with going back or you were clsoer than it looks to the other side.
0
FollowupID: 861868

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:01

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:01
Hi Les

We were less than 15 metres from the more solid mud before we bellied right out, while behind us was more than 200 metres of think deep mud.

There was no way we could have been snatched out backwards, as the vehicle would have been bogged himself, and as you can see, we were so close, yet so far from that more stable mud.



Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 861873

Reply By: Member - backtracks - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:44

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 21:44
Maxtrack, or in my case treds.only used them once so far, truck jumped out of the sand !
AnswerID: 593584

Reply By: Batt's - Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:58

Tuesday, Dec 08, 2015 at 22:58
I bought a tirfor in the late 80's, have just about always taken it 4WDriving. I've used is stacks of times in the bush it's been a priceless piece of gear for me over the yrs. I still have it and throw it in the car even though I've had an electric winch for about 10 yrs. I've never used Maxtrax but I can see myself getting some one day or maybe some Muputrax for bridging ruts etc when I start going to some more isolated regions they look like a good modern day piece of recovery gear.

So the Maxtrax would be very handy and quick to get you out of a variety of situations but I would chose the tirfor based on my yrs of experience and that I have never needed the Maxtrax product as yet or I would have definitely purchased some by now. I suppose you could say in a way the equivilant to them would be trees and branches that we all have used as a substitute for Maxtrax over the yrs and there are still plenty of trees left.
AnswerID: 593588

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:50

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:50
Not a lot of trees on the beach.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861870

Follow Up By: Batt's - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 13:46

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 13:46
That's what the shovel is for I've only ever had to walk up the beach once for a few km to get help it was a nice day for a walk anyway lol burying the spare was the other option if there were no other vehicles in site.
0
FollowupID: 861912

Reply By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 05:21

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 05:21
I carry both, 1x tirfor and 2 sets of maxtrak. The tirfor because I tipped her over on her side so it was a side lift ( also handy to pull fenders out) and the traks get used a lot, particularly soft sand and they are brilliant.
Incidentally I always carry all the recovery gear and mostly help "others" out who carry "none"....go figure.
AnswerID: 593593

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 06:53

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 06:53
..
The stabilising thing with the trifors is where I've seen then used more than straight recoveries (lotsa example pics online), I reckon there'd be nothing like the feeling of security when you are sideways on a steep slope with two wheels hanging over the edge of the track, once you hook a trifor up to stop you tipping or slipping further.
This also stops tipping / slipping when winch or towed back on track.

Yeah, many go out without the basics, most very thankful when someone helps them with their gear.

Even if they have the right gear I've helped many that don't know how to use it.
Had one bloke with his wife in a Merc type of 4WD down on one of the Beachport - Robe beaches stuck, had been there for 2 hours, no one had stopped, they probably seemed to be ok, were Maxxing up the beach from down on an angled section of real soft stuff.
He was sitting in the car, his WIFE was moving the Max and then he was having another go.
Expect not enough digging to get them in properly, and he was in high range.

Got him in LR, dug em in for him and directed him to ease out in 2nd, drove fronts straight off them and hit the rears hit too for another bite of momentum, and he drove straight up the beach, took less than a few minutes.

Thanks to all out there that help people stuck, it's a great part of the 4WD culture that is good to see.
0
FollowupID: 861860

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:45

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:45
I have used a tirfor heaps of time, the most memorable being to right an 80 series on a 25 degree hill that had fallen onto its side (in the high country). We had two winches uphill of it (electric vehicle mounted) and the tirfor to pull it back onto its wheels. Both of the lower tyres rolled off the rims, great fun to change on a hill, but the driver had two spares so no need to be busier than we already were. 5 hour recovery. The driver was just going to drive out with one of us and get someone else to come get his $60k vehicle........

But I'd have treds.....
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 861887

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:41

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:41
Trifor, perfect tool to use to stabilise that sort of scenario.
If I was doing regular winch country work, I'd certainly have an electric winch, probably cradle mounted with square hitch fitting, and have one of those on front and rear with electrics in place to suit.
Would be great to winch forward or back as needed.
1
FollowupID: 861896

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:52

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:52
Yep Les, I purchased one after seeing my mate get hooked on his diff/axle up in the Otways and how easy it was to clear himself, would have taken me 15 mins with the tirfor. Horses for courses, got synthetic rope now and regular service every 8 years....

All the best mate
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 861898

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:56

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:56
You're quick on the trifor Bonz, I reckon it'd take me 15 mins to get it out of the back !!
Then another to work out which way to set it up, try it, take down again and set it up the right way, and go again LOL.
2
FollowupID: 861900

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 12:07

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 12:07
We winched a 60 series out of a mud hole in Wonnongatta valley around 1979, they'd driven into the hole, hooked up their winch to pull them thru and broke shear pins in the winch, then wrapped the cable around a rear wheel and tried to use the wheel to pull themselves out backwards and blew up the rear diff then started walking, dad, daughter and grandpa in a two day old vehicle.

We turned up, had it tirfored out in 25 mins, pulled the smashed remnants out of the rear diff and they drove out in front wheel drive. They hadnt seen anyone in 18 hours. They were a little relieved, the daughter burst into tears when she saw us round the bend on a 500 BSA sidecar outfit.

Swore back then I needed a tirfor and I was right.
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 861901

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 12:15

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 12:15
Good story, I bet those people remember that effort helping them to this day too.
1
FollowupID: 861902

Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 06:48

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 06:48
Winch every time.
The recurring theme above is sand, and if three feet of board can get you going again in sand, you weren't set up correctly in the first place, because it isn't that bad.
My Brahno hand winch has been indispensable over the years for recoveries in dire situations where if someone suggested I used max tracks I'd wrap them around their heads. In combination with a winch for popping an undriven wheel back up onto the surface, they work great rather than pushing whatever you are bogged in. Most times I see maxtrax getting deployed on the beach the situation was avoidable and there are better alternatives.
AnswerID: 593595

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 07:01

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 07:01
..
Quite often, all people have to do is drop pressures a bit more, clear some sand, and they'll drive straight out, or get a light snatch, or use the Max as well to be sure.

A winch is no good unless you can anchor, and I've seen those boat type sand anchors just bury, deep . . . usually the 4B is a much better anchor than the anchor itself !! :/
Sure, winching from mud, up a steep rocky slope, plenty of good anchors in the way of trees, no worries (if you have an electric winch much better, but even a trifor or other is better than nothing).

Have helped many on bad beaches in minutes with Max, they'd be digging for hours some of them, and sometimes time isn't on your side !!
But usually you can drop another 4psi,, down to nil pressure if needed, dig a bit of sand out for a few secs each tyre and drive out, other times not.
Lots of boggings are avoidable in hindsight (or if people got out of their vehicles and had a little walk recce, but many don't).
0
FollowupID: 861861

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:47

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:47
If youre bottomed out in the sand the trax helps pop the diffs up, they are a bugger of a thing to dig out.
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 861888

Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 07:43

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 07:43
Gazza,
If you can try to borrow and use a Tirfor on your own. They are very effective but heavy, hard work, slow to deploy and pack up. The wire rope seems to always have hypodermic grade strands sticking out. They take up a surprising amount of room too and never seem to fit anywhere.

I have Maxtraks and a winch and would not go remote without them. My roof rack carries the maxtraks, a spare tyre (not wheel), Hilift jack and a long handle shovel. That is the max load I like to have up high. I have seen strips of conveyer belting used very effectively. and they roll up for easy storage.

The choice is governed by where you tend to go and how much you push when the going gets tough. As we get older we are less inclined to continue when the going gets bad but still like to push on a bit. I like having the recovery options.

I also carry a bottle jack and big base that can be used when the vehicle is bogged down. This allows easily lifting the wheel and packing stuff under.
AnswerID: 593599

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:19

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 08:19
..
I have one of those air bag jacks, received for b'day, haven't had a chance to use / try it yet.
Might be a great option to get high and cover ruts to get level again, not sure how it'd go in mud.
Also unknown how long they take to inflate, suspect reasonably quick, can be done from exhaust or air comp.
1
FollowupID: 861864

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:38

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:38
Hey Les, using an air jack in real mud is an hilarious experience that everyone should try at least once. It's fairly similar to mud or jelly wrestling that I've seen in a few movies. :-) The air jacks work great in sand though.
3
FollowupID: 861885

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:49

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:49
My ears are still ringing from when an airbag jack exploded at Robe in 2001, make sure you carefully position those suckers and I would always use a car mat between them and their contact point on the vehicle.
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 861889

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:53

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 11:53
..
Mud would be interesting, those air bags are definitely more for sand.
I can't imagine air bags would lift you too good from a deep sucking mud, not much can, probably gentle winching and shovel is best there to break the suction.

Bonzs comment in post above about when up to your axles it's not a lot of fun on the shovel, and certain mud is easy to sink into, unlike sand.
Sand you just stop digging yourself in before you get too deep, and self recover before too much spade work is needed.
0
FollowupID: 861899

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:06

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:06
Not really knocking winches...... they would be useful in the High Country, but I never go there.

But remember what Len Beadell said after his "retirement trip" to the deserts......... "The winch was wonderful. It pulled out 6 trees!"
Typical Beadell expression. LOL
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 593608

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:14

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 09:14
Oh, incidentally, Lennie did not have a winch on his Landrover throughout the whole time of his time in the deserts.
His bulldozer did, but I doubt that MaxTrax would be much help for that. lol
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 861876

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:52

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 10:52
Dozers carry their own Maxtracks, and ride easy on them! Wasn't Doug the dozer driver? Great times he wrote about and gee he got out of some close scrapes. Quintessential bushman. Thanks for the memories awash with his escapades, I might go read the books again
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 861890

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 15:21

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 15:21
Yes Bonz, Doug Stoneham was the dozer operator throughout. Scotty Boord on the grader and Rex Flatman, Bill Lloyd, Frank Quinn and Paul Christensen lending a hand. Tough blokes all.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861918

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 13:20

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 13:20
Use whatever you have got, or can get.....
But my first choice would be a good compressor, followed by a winch, but a friend with a snatch is usually the go.

This is a random selection, in no particular order.

Friend and winch.


Very big tractor (a 'normal' tractor had already failed).


Dramatically reduced tyre pressures.



20% less air.


Snow chains. They are spectacular in mud with some sort of 'bottom'. Stuart Highway, 1974.


Turfor combined with very low air pressure.


Turfor and 3 connected fence droppers about 500mm long each.


Turfor and buried spare.


Margaret... :-) Sat strategically above the spinning wheel.


Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome



AnswerID: 593621

Reply By: jodie0075 - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:03

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:03
First of all,a big thank you to all of your responses. Much appreciated.

A bit of background to my question. My partner and i travel alone unfortunately on our bigger trips. We have lots of friends who like camping they are just not so keen on being on the road for 6/7 weeks at a time which we love. Whats not to love!

Our vehicle, not by choice, is a 2013 Colorado 2wd. It is a company vehicle that i can drive wherever i like as part of my salary so we make do. It has got reasonable clearance and so far we have conquered roads such as the Tanami , Gibb River , Savannah Way, into the Bungles, El Questro etc with no issues so far towing our Trak Shak camper trailer..No beach work obviously. We travel to the conditions and drop tyre pressures as necessary and carry plenty of spares.

I guess (and maybe foolishly so) i have always thought if we got into real trouble someone would come along to help out, at least on the roads mentioned above in peak season which is when we travel. I understand this may not be the case in really remote areas which at this stage we stay away from.

As i cant go adding all the bits and pieces to the vehicle that i would like, i was thinking what would be the one piece of recovery equipment that i would be more likely to use on our travels.Was thinking hand winch or Maxtrax, hence the question.

We are planning on doing the Strzelecki, Oodnadatta and Birdsville track early next year so thought it maybe a good time to be a little more prepared. We are also hoping to go to the Cape in August via the Bloomfield track and the PD road.

I think it will be the Maxtrax for me.

Cheers Gazza
AnswerID: 593631

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:35

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 17:35
..
The Maxtrax will serve you well if needed, obviously they'll be used under the rear wheels :)

(I find going out forwards with 4WD they are best used under the front tyres, you usually get the back wheels up to the Max for a 2nd hit of momentum then.)
0
FollowupID: 861928

Reply By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 19:25

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 19:25
I'm totally happy with my Bog Out if I have to winch.

https://youtu.be/MoofMb2pnGI

It's cheap, it weighs nothing, takes up no space and it works...forwards or backwards.
AnswerID: 593636

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 20:51

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2015 at 20:51
They certainly are interesting Michael.
Only problem, once again you need an anchor point of some sort. However I suspect that because the driven wheels are still in contact with the ground and prevented from spinning that the pulling load on the Bog Out would be much less than that of a conventional winch.
Include the benefits of insignificant weight, low cost, easy storage and no mechanical maintenance, and you have a winner.
The next time I get hopelessly bogged I will buy one as soon as I get home. haha.

Oh, and not to forget....... there is no exhibition of a "Badge of Honour" !!! LOL
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861936

Reply By: Member - abqaiq - Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 11:55

Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 11:55
Sand ladders were the go in Saudi. We used offshore fiberglass deck grating. Helmut at GordiGear in Southport has similar in a pack that can also be used as bench and table. Probably even a bridge at a small gully. Cheaper than the plastic things (maxtrac, etc.) and way more robust.. No connection to GordiGear, bah bah.
Abqaiq
AnswerID: 593657

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 17:54

Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 17:54
..
Yes, FGRP grating is grate (great) ! :D :D
Google it, a couple of good suppliers of full size sheets here in Oz, if bought in thick enough material it can bridge quite well.

There are a variety of grid patterns and sizes, and there is one with abrasive grit in the top for traction.

While you can buy CTS (cut to size) ready to go, getting a sheet and cutting up to your needs is cheapest, probably make 6 or so sets (pair) of usual say 1100 x 300 size.
It would certainly work out less, but a bit of mucking about with a suitable circular saw / blade.
1
FollowupID: 861961

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 18:53

Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 at 18:53
Yes Les, it can be readily cut but the blade needs to be diamond tipped or tungsten carbide at a pinch. Either in a saw or an angle grinder.
What is really important with this stuff is the dust danger so it's essential to use a P1 or P2 Dust Mask. Together of course with eye and ear protection.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 861964

Reply By: Member - Young Nomads - Saturday, Dec 12, 2015 at 21:25

Saturday, Dec 12, 2015 at 21:25
maxtrax are the more practical choice....we have them but don't wear them like a bright orange bandaid on the back of our car LOL..we hide them...we have a tirfor, but have never used it in 15 years!

We only crumpled to the purchase after erring on the side of caution for a more remote trip..
Never had the need for the maxtrax on our recent Madigan trip...They remain zip tied together back in their box in the shed now LOL

Don't go for the cheaper option..our companions tried their" t...s" brand out..the lugs snapped off first go, even though were using them correctly...maxtrax are Aussie and worth the expense I reckon.
AnswerID: 593742

Reply By: Crackles - Saturday, Dec 12, 2015 at 23:10

Saturday, Dec 12, 2015 at 23:10
For a novice definately recommend grabbing a set of Maxtrax. Over time with more experience & a better set up vehicle you may find you wont need to carry them any more.
Being old school very few I travel with carry them yet somehow we managed to drive some of the most difficult tracks in Australia & when we did get stuck always got out in fact every time I have seen others use Plastic Trax of various brands they took way longer to recover their vehicle than other available options.
I had a giggle when a few of my newbie mates got bogged at Beachport & built a road with 24 Maxtrax taking 2 hours to get out exclaiming how they saved the day. (That's $2500 worth) Irony was a Patrol was driving back & forward on the same beach mocking their predicament as all they really needed was 5 minutes with a shovel & 10 psi less!
As for Tirfors not so useful in central Oz with limited anchor points but would be far more handy up the Cape or High Country. Problem is they are very hard work & you'd need to be fit to use one for any lengh of time.
AnswerID: 593748

Follow Up By: Batt's - Wednesday, Dec 16, 2015 at 12:41

Wednesday, Dec 16, 2015 at 12:41
Being fit is a big advantage when using tirfors also the more you use them the better you get and the easier they are to set up, use and you learn to get into a rhythm working the handle back and forth using full strokes so the jaws can operate correctly and standing side on is the best way to use them. I was a conveyor belt splicer for 20 yrs so we used tirfors a lot up to 3 ton capacity especially underground and sometimes combined with a snatch block or 2 and using 2 people is a good way of shearing the pin or pins. I'd struggle a bit more these days not being as fit.
0
FollowupID: 862204

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)