Planning Lap of Oz 200 series and a caravan.

Submitted: Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:21
ThreadID: 131232 Views:2735 Replies:14 FollowUps:33
This Thread has been Archived
My partner and I are starting to plan a lap around this wonderful place.
We have a 200 series diesel but dont yet have the caravan ( off road) yet. Still deciding.
We are looking for any assistance for budgeting and even what caravan you may have used.
So anyone who has recently done this or in the middle of planning love to hear from you.
Any tips or leads you about the planning, ( Spreadsheets )
Warmest regards
D n D
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: TomH - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:30

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:30
First thing is to state your budget for the van They can go from $50,000 to $150,000 so where are you at.

We found staying in Van parks every night for over a year and doing 51,000Km it cost just over $1 a Km. We did some good trips like flying into the Bungles and the Horizontal Falls But you only go once so do it all. Dont be like friends of ours who only had their pension and had to wait to move and did hardly any decent sightseeing trips. A waste of time going if you are like that.
AnswerID: 594272

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:45

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:45
"had to wait to move and did hardly any decent sightseeing trips"

Beats sitting at home nonetheless, I would have thought....(under assumption they weren't also eating dog food :)

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

4
FollowupID: 862627

Follow Up By: 985 - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:47

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:47
Hi TomH
We figured around 80k for the van. Not too many parks but as much free camping as possible.
Yes doing the add on trips are also to included. Horizontal Falls Helicopter rides etc.
When did you do it?
What was your overall cost for the trip? We are thinking for at least a years duration.
What was your Van and Vehicle?
Thanks heaps
D n D
1
FollowupID: 862628

Follow Up By: TomH - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:12

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:12
6 Years ago and as I said a bit over $1 a Km for EVERYTHING The more you do the more it costs at the same rate.

A 100ser TD and a CRAPomal Princeton 754.
0
FollowupID: 862630

Follow Up By: TomH - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:17

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:17
Beats sitting at home nonetheless, I would have thought....(under assumption they weren't also eating dog food :)

Sometimes not much better it seemed.

My point was if you are going to do it Do it all.
Not a lot of fun sitting in a park all week because you have no money for fuel to sightsee let alone enough to get you to the next destination.

They were very frustrated at times and ended up not enjoying what should have been a great time.
0
FollowupID: 862631

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:39

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:39
Re "doing it all".... the trick I think is to develop a good capacity to see and observe things. A lot of folk seem to rush from one "tourist spot" to the next without really looking (or seeing) what is in between, which is where a lot of the really interesting and beautiful things and places are. Serendipity is your friend when travelling, though a broadly planned itinerary has some benefits too. Sightseeing doesnt have to cost, but we work on the principle that we may never be back to a particular place so we better see what we can while we are there without worrying too much about what the cost is. We take heaps of photos and write up a diary every day to record where we have been and what we have seen. Putting that together in a blog is a good way to consolidate travel memories and put a bit of perspective around all the experiences that we have while on the road.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 862633

Follow Up By: axle - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 20:15

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 20:15
Greg!,..Nothing wrong with dog food,Just gotta cook it right!...lol
3
FollowupID: 862637

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 21:33

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 21:33
True - my in-laws seem happy enough.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 862646

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:47

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:47
Perhaps a bit more info about where you want to go, how long you plan to take and even a rough idea of your age (20s or 70s?) would help give you better advice. Its a big country and I doubt that you would ever see all there is to see. For budgetting purposes a very rough rule of thumb is to work on $1 per km but that will vary a lot depending on preferences re how far you travel and how fast, where you stay and how you eat and drink.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 594274

Reply By: 985 - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:59

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:59
Hi Val
we are just 60 and have done a reasonable amount of 4WDing with a Camper Trailer ( Aussie Swag ) but want a bit more comfort for a year or so..With the $1 per K does that include all things food servicing etc or just fuel and camp costs?
Have you done the trip recently?
Cheers and many thanks
D n D
AnswerID: 594275

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:24

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 18:24
Hi DnD,
We have done a lot of travel over the past 20 years, much of it in remote areas (have a look through our blogs). We travel in a uniquely set up Troopy, and have never owned a caravan though as we are now in our 70s do understand what you mean about having some extra comfort. The $1/km would be an all-inclusive figure that has been arrived at from many discussions on this forum,over the past 10 years or so. As I indicated it is a very rough average indicator. From our experience fuel makes up by far the biggest portion of the cost, and our average trip cost usually comes in below that $1/km figure. The cost of food and beverages will depend on how often you eat out, whether you drink tea or fine wines and so on. I would expect that travelling in a van would not be that much different from how you travelled with your camper trailer?

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862632

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 13:17

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 13:17
We tow a CT and don't often use CPs, we do almost all our own meals and happy hour is a cup of tea.
We wouldn't come close to $1 per km - not counting service costs or wear and tear unless paid for on the trip.
1
FollowupID: 862676

Reply By: Witi Repartee - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:59

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 17:59
That's a big subject...I'll get the ball rolling. Your tug is excellent. What you need to decide do you want "Dirt Road" with good freedom camping ability...or do you want true "Offroad". The true Off Roader is usually a very heavy beast and will cost more to tow...and do you really want to tow 3.5 tonne through sand, mud and in and out of creeks etc.
We're in a similar siuation...so far a year of research into Brands and abilities and we will be going for a Dirt Roader with prolonged bush camping ability. We will be doing the iconic trips such as the Gibb River Road, The Cape...etc etc.Several of our important considerations are
1) Payload, i.e. the amount your van can carry. 400kg seems to be the norm.Its not enough once water, gas, tools and gear is added up. You will need 550kg/600kg if you are looking at extra solar panels or batteries/greywater etc.
2) External storage. A surprising number of vans don't have adequate external storage as we possibly want to carry a generator (mainly for the aircon) and also a cupboard or boot which can take a couple of good quality comfy fold up chairs and a camp table.(The table on the side of most vans is inadequate for longer stays)
3) Aircon. If you are using a genny...make sure your aircon has a "soft start" fitted.This will allow most popular 2kva Generators to run it.
4) I have been around Australia with a Roller Rocker type ...this time we're looking at a van with Simplicity or one of the Independent types. The R and R is OK...but we had to go very slow in some places for long periods to avoid van damage.
As we live in WA..we are limited to the makes of new vans available over here.
On our list at the moment is Kokoda (seems good value for money). Retreat, nice finish and build quality and similar comments for Traveller and Crusader.
Make sure your warranty is direct with the Manufacturer and not a third party smoke screen.
Finally...your budget...it'll never be big enough.!!




AnswerID: 594276

Follow Up By: 985 - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 19:52

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 19:52
Hi Witi R,
yes its a pandorah's box alright. We are confident with the 200 having had it for 3 years and done quite a lot of off road 4WDing and belong to a club. "Dirt road" like gibb river would be as tough as we want to take the van on ( also up to the cape as far as we can go ) I think that we are in total agreement about payload. We dont wish to tow anything over 3000 if we can help it! ( fully loaded )
I really appreciate your advise about the Air con and the genny.
The Kokoda van..and the Crusader & Traveller what brand are they or made by whom.
I am very keen to get your input having already done the trip and why these choices?
We are based in Sydney ( but not for too long LOL )
With regards to the budget for the trip itself ( excluding the purchase of the van ) $1.5 per klm?
Warm regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862636

Reply By: Witi Repartee - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 20:27

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 20:27
Make sure you understand the weights on your compliance plates...both for your tug and Van ATM GCM.Tare. Ball weight etc. Keep it legal and avoid insurance and warranty problems.

In no particular order this is my checklist so far...for a mix of bush and caravan park sojourns.

Grey water tank?....will probably self fit.
Under van...Check welds and plumbing.
Is Chassis galv or painted?
Chassis size 100mm or 150mm?
Does drawbar A frame extend back to axles?
Towball height vs Tug towbar
Offroad hitch DO35 or similar.
Anderson terminals on van?
Caravan external cladding and colour options?
Extra supports on rear bumper for added wheel/jerrycans etc
Reverse Camera?
Reposition washing machine to create space for Generator hatch. (Only applicable for some makes of vans)
Awning, extra support bracket in middle
Extra solar panel and battery. (300w of solar minimum and 2x 100ah batteries minimum)
4" lift on chassis with larger rims and genuine offroad tyres. (Some makes only)
Exterior gas bayonet.TV plug and power points.Check exterior lighting.
Size of TV supplied.
Cupboards convertible to drawers, particularly under the seating.
Mattress upgrade or have own made?
Storage for deckchairs and table.
Self tuning Satellite TV fitted at Manufacture. (Mounts need to be built into roof)
Brand of electrical controller and its abilities and limits. Will it accept extra solar panels etc.
12v fan built into caravan for night use in bedroom.
Stability control (ESC..make and model)
Where does aircon condensate water drain to?
Off side shade sail rail fitted.
Check standard of silicone application around vents and up on roof.Look for tidy workmanship.
Proper window over bed? (If at front of van water sealing may be an issue)
Finish inside cupboards? Is beading around cupboard openings or is it just wood cut?
Soft start fitted to Aircon. If Ibis 2 get upgrade to Ibis 3.
City/Camp water supply pressure controller
Do water tanks fill without air locking?
Is a wiring diagram available
ATM. Get manufacturer to upgrade and stamp Compliance plate accordingly. 550kg/600kg needed. Should be no or minimal cost.But expensive to do retrospectively.
Make of appliances such as microwave, range hood. They vary considerably.
Control panel for electrics and water? Cupboard mounted or on van wall etc?
Is TV bracket quick release?
Type of step fitted and ease of use.

These are items we check...its not exhaustive ....plus we try and assess resale and eye appeal (the wow factor)
I'm not electrically minded or an engineer...no doubt others can add much more to this list.










AnswerID: 594281

Follow Up By: Member - John - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 21:19

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2015 at 21:19
Witi, I "thanked" you but then thought that your comprehensive reply needed a more personal reply. Thanks, it has concisely listed things to consider, most I would never have though of until after a purchase. Thanks, a big thanks. John
John and Jan

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 862644

Follow Up By: Members - Bow & Nan - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 08:30

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 08:30
Grey water tank is a waste of room and weight.
"Work interferes with living"

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862665

Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 10:16

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 10:16
Bow and Nan, "Grey water tank is a waste of room and weight.", that it maybe, but more and more a requirement in a lot of places.............
John and Jan

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 862668

Follow Up By: Members - Bow & Nan - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:37

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:37
The only place I know you need a grey water tank is Cooktown.

We never camp near towns.

"Work interferes with living"

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 862684

Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 15:39

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 15:39
Bow and Nan, I do understand what you are saying, but as more and more places, even free camp areas etc require grey water tanks it is something that has to be considered. Threads 130156 and 98211 have some useful information....... Enjoy your travels.
John and Jan

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862688

Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 00:05

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 00:05
Hi D n D. There are hundreds of different caravans out there and we all choose to suit out needs and likes, which will be different to yours. You can see from my profile what we chose; tough, not too big, a basic no frills model to get out in the outback. Solar panels, compressor fridge and small bathroom.

For costs, I have been asked "How much money do I need to travel around Australia in a caravan? ". My answer is "it will cost as little or much as you have available." Google these phrases and you will see the full details to help you calculate for your lifestyle.

From My Blogs you can see the types of routes we have chosen to see "The real Australia". Questions and feedback welcomed.

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 594288

Follow Up By: 985 - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 08:05

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 08:05
Thanks Motherhen,
I will have a good look at your blog today.
I am really trying to a handle on the dollar costs for a trip were we don't skinmp on seeing things or doing the odd Helicopter ride or excursion.We will most likely only get one go at this and want to do it thoroughly. 1-2 years. Also the possibility of maybe working along the way IF we need to.
Thanks again for your reply,
I will be in touch again soon
Warmest regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862664

Reply By: Witi Repartee - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 10:22

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 10:22
No doubt you've spotted the good discussion on the Compressor vs 3 Way fridges a few posts down?
Also Lithium battery's should be checked out. It never ends does it!
My wish list is bigger than my budget lol.
AnswerID: 594294

Follow Up By: 985 - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:40

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:40
Yes that will be a decision for many a beer I think with my 4WD mates too
The pros and cons of a three way fridge.
I am very interested in a $$ estimate for the travel component of a 12 month trip like this one, if you have any input into this I would really like it.
Warm regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862686

Reply By: Member - MARIC - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 11:01

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 11:01
Re caravan, if you like a luxury caravan plus full off road capabilities ( and are prepared to spend lots) have a look at Spinifex Vans, although I am biased.
Re budgeting etc we always work on the basis that the food component applies whether at home or travelling.
Have fun when you do go
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 594295

Follow Up By: 985 - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:38

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 14:38
Hi Maric
You have a spinifex I amssume??
If so could you give me a few specs on it pls?
Good thought regarding the food budget do you have any $$ advice regarding the trip itself?
Yes I love the one about the mozzie!
Regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862685

Reply By: wendys - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 15:25

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 15:25
We did the lap (more like some figure of eights) over a few years. Had a Landrover Defender and towed a Trakmaster caravan - true off road ability. Ours was the Kimberley model - not too big and heavy - and we kept it fairly basic. Had solar and a 12v compressor fridge.
AnswerID: 594311

Follow Up By: Witi Repartee - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 16:20

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 16:20
How much solar and battery capacity? Was this a caravan fridge or a portable one such as an Engle?
0
FollowupID: 862690

Follow Up By: 985 - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 16:30

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 16:30
Hi Wendy sounds great .. what was the weight of the Trakmaster laden?
Also are you able to give me some idea of costs for the trip.. I am desperately trying to get a handle on the $$
Was it just the 2 of you?
We are thinking Solar and maybe a gennie as well not too sure, if you have 3 deep cycle batteries then we should be OK..
Love to hear more if you have time
Regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862691

Follow Up By: wendys - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:39

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:39
Solar panels 280 (watts???). Had 2 AGM 120 AH batteries for van. Because we did not have "frills" like hot water, or even a water pump - in order to use less power (and water) - all that ran from our set up was 12v lights and the fridge. Sometimes ran the inverter to use laptops, charge camera battery etc.
The fridge was a built in Vitrifrigo compressor fridge - about 90L I think. Not big, but adequate. It worked very well, even in extreme heat.
We once spent nearly 6 months living in a bush clearing, in NT Gulf country - no power except the above set up. Worked fine.
We also carried a Chescold 3 way portable fridge - sometimes left van behind and tent camped (e.g. Simpson Desert). It also served as drinks fridge some of the time - on gas or 240v if we had it.
Trakmaster weighed about 1.9 tonne fully laden. 2x9kg gas bottles. 2x60L water tanks.
Was just the two of us.
Is hard to give costs because our travel varied so widely, and some of it was a while ago now. Ranged from free camps to Nat Parks to caravan parks. We tended to set up in a place and then explore the surrounding area, could be for a few days or a month, depending on the area and how we felt. We rarely ate "bought" meals, coffees etc and that kept costs down. We were also quite selective about what paid attractions/tours we did, so did not spend a heap that way. I reckon that if we were doing it all over again, now, I'd be allowing an average of $250 a week fuel, $200 accommodation, $300 food and other costs (but not including things like vehicle insurances, rego, home house costs etc, tyres and repairs). I stress the "average". We could be somewhere like Wonga Beach in Qld and not drive anywhere for a couple of weeks. Or be in the Kimberley where diesel prices were hitting $2 a litre.
We did eventually carry a Honda 10 generator, for use when weather didn't favour the solar panels - didn't need it much, but was sometimes very handy.
1
FollowupID: 862704

Follow Up By: 985 - Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:37

Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:37
Thanks so much Wendy
You are a gem
Cheers
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862781

Reply By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 17:28

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 17:28
We generally find it costs us about the same to live while travelling for a few months as it does to live at home. We always make sure that extra funds are available for the occasional "opportunity of a lifetime' special helicopter trip etc. We also have enough in hand to cover a major mechanical issue if needed - even items such as new windscreens and tyres can also be expensive in the bush. While travelling you are spending more on fuel than at home but, if you wish to really see the country you certainly don't want to be driving long distances every day. If you are set up to free camp your accommodation costs will be reduced even though this option will not always be available. Meanwhile you will not be at home running up power bills and spending on the usual entertainment costs there and, unless your tastes are extravagant, food averages out much the same everywhere. You may find a pressure cooker or a Thermo Pot (various brands available) insulated slow cooker a boon for economical and tasty soups and casseroles etc on the road . When selecting a caravan only consider a well established brand and a van with a generous payload well within your vehicles specifications. If you want a washing machine and all electrical toys when free camping you will have to upgrade the solar power capability of most vans or rely on a generator which may not be welcome in many campsites. Make sure your manufacturer has a very good warranty and a good reputation for customer support. However good your van you are sure to have some issues and you will want someone helpful and capable at the end of a phone to sort out your problem. There is so much to see and, of course this type of travel is addictive! Two years will not be enough! Lynne
John & Lynne

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 594318

Follow Up By: 985 - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 17:52

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 17:52
Thank you John and Lynne
I think you are on the money when you sum up the food situation. Yes we do wish to have the opportunity to take advantage of various helicopter trips and special excursions that are a "Must See" whilst on the trip. What Van did you use for your trip?
We are not going to have a washing machine just do a hand wash every so often. I think Good solar power is a must to boost all the nice things like the extra fridge in the beast as well as the one in the van. Yes emergency breakdown and repair money is a must that one always hopes wont be needed.
Regular servicing is a must did you have any issues there??
Warmest regards
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862695

Follow Up By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 22:35

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 22:35
Our current van is one of the first Sunland Patriots and is nearly five years old now. We have not travelled continuously for 2 years but have had several trips of about six months. The van has been very comfortable to live in in all sorts of weather and has stood up to very rough roads. It has also done very well in dust - which is a desirable feature in the Outback! No one wants to clean red dust out every day! We have no plans to replace this van.The new models are more luxurious and expensive than ours! Don't let anyone tell you that you don't need a bathroom. We tried that before. We did not put in a washing machine but have a very useful extra cupboard instead. We go well with hand washing and a barrel shaped plastic container with screw on lid which washes clothes as we travel! We use laundries when we stay in caravan parks for sheets etc. We did install a gas heater and have been very glad of that. This type of van is very comfortable but a bit big for really off road use. It is warranted for any road or track on a map and we have tried a few! Support from Sunland has been excellent. We don't carry a generator - more weight and a different fuel to worry about. Solar works fine for us. Our Land Cruiser 100 Series tows it happily. Enjoy your search for the right van for you and don't be rushed. Caravaners Forum is a good place to start asking questions. Lynne
John & Lynne

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862712

Reply By: Member - MARIC - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 19:48

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 19:48
Hi again D n D, re van not yet, picking it up Feb 17th, re specs, they are all custom built, so what you want is what you get. Ours has 4 140w solar panels, 2 200amp lithium batteries, 12v compressor vitrigo fridge, self adjusting airbag suspension, 2 200l water tanks 1 65l drinking water and 1 80l grey water tank, sat tv,settled for 20'6" internal with double bed rather than queen size, more room for movement in passage on either side, and half hour super fund down the gurgler ;o))
Yes we have done a little bit of travelling across Australia since 1969 when Eyre Hwy was dirt from WA border through to Port Augusta SA, I am from WA and my wife was a Qld'er. so every now and again (2nd year), travelled through Kimberley up to Kalumburu, across Gibb River to Cape Leveque, have niece and her hubby in Daly River region NT.
Re tips, take your time and enjoy, with us and 4 kids before they left home it was, "we must come back and do it again" and sometimes you just don't do that. We mostly free camp for about a week or so and then head to a caravan park, find people free camping more open and friendly. $$$ wise, their was a excell spread sheet that I downloaded to work out costs and it was bloody good. If you are good with excell you could probably knock it up yourself. It had your fuel, food, insurance reoccurring costs for home etc whilst away. If you want more info PM me be glad to chat
cheers for now and wath out for mozzies ;o))
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 594324

Reply By: Member - MARIC - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:17

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:17

Tried importing spreadsheet but it didn't work ..... sorry
can anyone help it's on my desktop using windows 10 ;o((
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 594328

Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:28

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:28
Maric, works for me................
John and Jan

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 862702

Follow Up By: Member - MARIC - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:47

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 20:47
D n D try going to www.expeditionaustralia.com.au/2012/09/how-much-does-it-cost-to-drive-around-australia, or look for website of Expedition Australia Big Lap Spreadsheet
cheers for now
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862706

Follow Up By: Member - MARIC - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 21:39

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2015 at 21:39
Hi John and Jan, I clicked on the icon in my reply and the worksheet popped up in the tool bar
........ duhhh (I'm learning lol)
It is only when you see mosquito land on your testicles that you find another way to solve problems without violence

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 862710

Follow Up By: 985 - Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 11:13

Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 11:13
Hi Guys yes thank you for all your replys its a good guide.
Many thanks to you all
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862741

Follow Up By: 985 - Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:35

Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:35
Yes have downloaded this spread sheet and its a great guie many thanks
Cheers
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862780

Reply By: Member - Blue M - Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 03:30

Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 03:30
It is a pity the costs of travel in 1976/77 were not the same today.
My Mum & Dad did a trip around Australia back then, and she kept a pretty in depth diary.
It was hand written and my wife retyped it, the whole 186 pages of it.
The summary on the last page was as follows :-

03-08-1976 to 06-01-1977
A 5 months relaxing holiday, travelling 28,516 km.

Cost of Petrol on trip $515.19
Petrol used 3075 litres
Litres per Klm 9.5
Cost of Caravan Parks 209.35
Oil 36.77
Oil Filters 14.28
Air filter 9.85
Food 487.51
Grog 284.80
Clothes 115.11
Gifts 149.81
Spare parts [most not used] 208.23
Tours 218.82
Films 107.46
Smokes 180.11
Banners 55.21
Other incidentals 53.37
2642.87

(had to laugh at a couple of the expenses)

It was done in a 2 wheel drive Nissan tray back ute with a home made canopy on it.
The luxuries we have today were non excitant back then.
Fridge was a tin esky, stove was run on Metho.
Long range tank was a 44 gallon drum secured in the back.

Cheers
AnswerID: 594341

Follow Up By: 985 - Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 11:19

Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 11:19
Yes indeed it was way cheaper then and probabbly they had lesser expectations than we do today.
I had a laugh over that too, now it solar panels and coffee machines.
Thank you for your wonderful memories and input.
We are thinking for a 200 and a moderate van less than 3000 fully loaded around $65 -$70k
this will hpefully allow us a few trips as we tour and maybe even a night in a motel with an extended shower!
Many thanks
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862743

Reply By: disco driver - Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 16:11

Thursday, Dec 31, 2015 at 16:11
Hi Guys,
Enjoy the planning. It can be fun.............or it can be real hard work..............or a bit of both.

Here's a couple of things to think about.

1.Caravan: If you want a really good offroad caravan check out Elron, made in WA to your design or available in stock designs. Great reputation for solid reliable units. Sometimes available 2nd hand in your price range.

2. Most vans in the lower end of the price range that are called "Off Road" are just modified on road units fitted with heavier springs and bigger wheel/tyre setups. In reality they are just "Dirt Road" vans and not particularly good at that either.

3. Buy the smallest possible van that enables you both to live comfortably for the whole period of the trip. Anything bigger will add weight, expense and increased fuel consumption. There's no real need to have an entire house on wheels.

Disco.
AnswerID: 594372

Follow Up By: 985 - Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:33

Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:33
Hiya Disco
I loked on the net for Elron and could not find anything by that name.. Elross?
Warmest regards
HNY
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862778

Follow Up By: disco driver - Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:39

Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 16:39
Yes, That's what I should have typed, but my brain was not totally in gear
Sorry.

Disco.
0
FollowupID: 862782

Follow Up By: 985 - Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 17:19

Saturday, Jan 02, 2016 at 17:19
Cool Thanks
Cheers
D n D
0
FollowupID: 862783

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)