Fuel Transfer System

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 18:43
ThreadID: 13839 Views:1648 Replies:8 FollowUps:6
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G'Dayy all. Thought I'd share my experience with the "Tanami Pump", previously mentioned in Posts 2836 / 8043.
I decided to try one after the B*%%$# fuel spout wanted to continuously point southwards when transferring fuel from a Jerry Can. This invention really is the Bee's Knees for effortlessly transferring fuel.
Now I don't even need to remove the Jerry Cans from the trailer.

An accessory I added to make the task even easier, was to construct a 2 metre piece of airline with a clip style Tyre Chuck at each end and a Flow Control Valve in between. (Cost me about $15 in materials)
All I do is connect one end to the trailer's spare tyre and the other end to the Tanami Pump and wallah, the fuel is transferred without any hassles whatsoever. Saves me the need to get "Big Red" out and connect him to the battery.

20 litres fuel - 40 psi pressure in the tyre.
Conservative transfer time - 2min 45 secs
Air usage - about 12 psi

This allows me to effortly transfer 60 litres of fuel (3 Jerry Cans) in about 8 minutes tops, without splashing my boots, wasting fuel, putting my back out, or yelling obscenities at an inanimate object. (The spout)

How's that for laziness?

Course, need to replenish the air in the tyre at some stage, but that can be during my leisure time when camped.

Slainte,
Sand Man
Bill


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Reply By: The Banjo - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 20:38

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 20:38
I agree Sandy - hate to lift the jerries to the filler - messy, dangerous and risky for the old back (which is extra risky in the bush - if the back goes you can't do a damned thing). I made a fuel filler from a small 12v pump (out of a Mitsi fuel tank)....but the Tanami sounds interesting....in case I don't find it, where do I learn more ?
AnswerID: 63494

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:04

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:04
Hi Banjo,

www.outbackin.com

The WEB site contains appropriate distributors in each State.

P.S. I am in no way connected with the Manufacturer but recognise a quality product when I see (and use) one.

I originally intended to make one up myself but had trouble finding a plain flat Jerry Can lid that I could drill into.

Fluked the manufacturer's site when searching through the Forum's Archives (see above Posts) and for the price, why "reinvent the wheel".

Sand Man
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Reply By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:03

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:03
"How's that for laziness?" ?????????

I would say ingenious!!!!!!!!
AnswerID: 63500

Reply By: 10 Para (Qld) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:06

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:06
Does the pump work with plastic JC as well as metal ones the plastic ones having the screw thread.
AnswerID: 63501

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:46

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:46
10 Para,

I think I read somewhere that the manufacturer had been asked about this but due to the large cost of tooling, decided against it at this stage.

Now me, I would investigate the construction of an adapter, to connect the standard Jerry Can style Pump to the round, threaded neck on the plastic containers.

I assume the plastic ones would take the 5 psi maximum pressure ?

Personally, I prefer the metal beasties anyway.

Sand Man
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Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:22

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:22
Sandman,
Just make sure you use the right hose, airline hose isn't really suitable for hydrocarbons. The hose might start to disintergrate internally putting bits in your tank or blocking your filter in the line up. Just a small thing, sounds like a great idea.
Keep the shiny side up

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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:41

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 21:41
Na Mate,

Only use the airline to pressurise the Jerry Can.
The pricipal is the air is pumped in at the top, displacing the fuel which is forced out via a pipe from the bottom of the Jerry and through a fuel grade plastic hose to the vehicle's tank.
Bill


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Reply By: STAN - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 23:20

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 23:20
Hi Guys Just be CAREFULL with this type of fuel transfer system . Your insurance company would wipe you like a dirty a.... If a fire occured whilst transfereing a flammable liquid with this method. It is quite clear in the AUST. DANGEROUS GOODS CODE. which is law in every Aust state. However it is lawfully OK to transfer diesel by this method. But still dangerous just the same Stan
AnswerID: 63518

Follow Up By: Vince NSW - Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 08:36

Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 08:36
Stan
What part of the Dg code are you looking at ?
With the addition of an earth strap there should be no probs with this system.
We use only air pumps to move large volumes of flammable liquids around our plant each day.
Regards
Vince
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Reply By: Mick - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 23:24

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 23:24
Sounds a clever little gadget but i think I'll stick to the old funnel! Mind you since I drive a turbo diesel with 180l tank capacity, transferring fuel is a rare occurence. I used less than half my fuel on a recent crossing of the Simpson desert so I guess I'm one of the lucky ones. If you have to transfer fuel regularly it seems a great idea though.
AnswerID: 63520

Follow Up By: Member - Bob - Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 10:47

Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 10:47
My beast has a 95 L tank. I drove from Canberra to Broome via back roads (GBH, SBJT, Desert Rd, Wapet Rd) without needing the jerry once. I had a 10 L jerry as back up but it just wasn't needed.
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FollowupID: 324788

Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 08:54

Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 08:54
Even easier idea is a small 12v fuel pump avail. most auto acc. places, small square fuel pump, with suction hose for jerry and long delivery hose and long power lead, light 12v wire, and you dont even have to shift jerrys, takes about 10 min per jerry, and will suck out of any container, while you are stopped for cuppa.
AnswerID: 63544

Reply By: Member - Camper (SA) - Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 13:20

Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 13:20
Has anyone considered static electricity in this scenario.
in a servo recently I read a warning about static electricity causing problems when even filling a very large container from the splash caused.
Seems to me that anything 12v could be ptentially more dangerous than I'd like to risk.
Burns let alone explosion in a remote location would be a nightmare!
Camper
AnswerID: 63582

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 16:19

Thursday, Jun 17, 2004 at 16:19
Camper,

Your'e spot on there Mate.

The instructions for the Tanami Pump specify to ensure the jerry can is earthed to the vehicle in some way (eg. jumper lead)

Of course, in my scenario the trailer is earthed to the vehicle and the jerry cans are earthed to the trailer. No problems:-

I luv it !

Sand Man
Bill


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