GVM Upgrade Hilux

Submitted: Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 17:38
ThreadID: 138885 Views:2015 Replies:14 FollowUps:37
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Hello. I too find my 2017 Hilux a 'little' overweight with all my camping gear, alum canopy and small van in tow; but nothing that a GVM upgrade to 3450kg wont fix.
So I am in the process of getting opinions, quotes and technical information.
At this stage, the most convenient for me is a local Pedders kit. ARB have advised against fitting their 3450 upgrade as my ute is only loaded during trips away, and ride will suffer if not loaded.
My goal is an upgrade that will not fail with what I do with it. (lots of gravel roads etc)
My wife's goal is a reasonable ride when travelling distance with a light load.
Any advice out there on brands, ride etc?
Trevor&Verna, Kal WA

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Reply By: RMD - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:11

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:11
Trevor. Best have a read of the issues Tezza has encountered with his Dmax with a SO CALLED GVM upgrade. Will the so called upgrade be sanctioned by Toyota? I think not. They, like other manufacturers, spec their vehicles and going over axle ratings isn't considered or allowed for by the GVM mobs.
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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:11

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:11
Spoke to Isuzu today and the dont recommend GVM upgrades. Whoever does the GVM upgrade has to cover the warranty above what the vehicle manufacturer will cover.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:11

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:11
It goes without saying that the vehicle manufacturer is not going to endorse a GVM upgrade or any other non genuine product on their vehicle whatever it is.
It is not going to effect your warranty in general except if there is a failure or issue that is related to whatever the modification you have done.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:41

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:41
Alby.
It seems manufacturers WILL try and deny warranty if the notice any mods/ additions. They will blame anything, even totally unrelated items. It doesn’t have to be related to the issue at hand.
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Follow Up By: Member - PhilD_NT - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 22:20

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 22:20
There's a problem with some views here. It's quite common for accessories, including GVM upgrades being done prior to registration and being done with the consent and active organisation of the Dealer's. If Manufacturers were so against this wouldn't they be demanding Dealers refrain from involvement in the fitting of non-factory items, OR, demanding that the buyer sign off on an acknowledgement that it will affect warranty.

Can anyone point to evidence that a buyer has been forced to sign such a waiver, because it was never asked of me. I had an issue with an over heating issue. First statement from the Workshop Foreman was "You have a bulbar and that could affect it". When told that they organised it, he backed off. End result was it had nothing to do with airflow but was either a faulty fuel pump, OR, was a passion finger issue from the previous service.

Manufacturers can carry on all they like about issues, but if they allow their Dealers to be involved in the fitting of these things, prior to 1st registration, then they are in some way accepting these fitments. Anyone seen the TV add where one make encourages the Dealer organising with one particular aftermarket supplier to have multiple items fitted that the buyer wants as a part of the sale?
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 22:47

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 22:47
There's some interesting reading in the FAQ section of the Statewide 4x4 site, as regards warranty, after a GVM upgrade.

They are saying the original manufacturer of the GVM upgrade will cover any warranty claims on any original component/s reportedly damaged by the GVM upgrade.
However, clutches are specifically excluded from warranty claims.

But also - the owner has to submit to independent testing to verify that the GVM upgrade has caused the component failure, or part-failure.

Then they state they won't cover any normal wear rates - and then also go on to say, that you can expect ACCELERATED normal wear rates, whenever a GVM upgrade is installed!
They pull out a figure of accelerated wear on a Hilux with a GVM upgrade, of a 19% higher wear rate, over normal wear!

To me, all the above seems to give the GVM upgrade installers a pretty big range of excuses to deny any warranty claims.

I note they fail to make mention of any "severe off-road conditions", or "remote region" road conditions, which may also be possibly pulled out, as a reason to deny any warranty claims on damaged components.

Statewide 4x4 - FAQ - GVM upgrades

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:27

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:27
Thanks guys - all interesting stuff..
And expected that the manufacturer (like banks and insurance companies) will try to weazle out of any claims. Ref - Toyota with its class action about DPF.
I intend to make the inquiry, and I probably know the answer.
If I choose to go down this path, I will probably have to accept the risk.
TJ
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Follow Up By: Tezza4567 - Thursday, Aug 29, 2019 at 05:30

Thursday, Aug 29, 2019 at 05:30
Some good news for me on the dmax, isuzu approved the repairs to my cracked diff housing. Was very surprised. Initial quote for just on 3k to repair. Got the vehicle back Last week and drives like new.
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:08

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:08
We built a trailer and only carry what we need after all we are camping.
We dont carry camp ovens, and instead of fancy but heavy sliding draws we use plastic tubs. We outfitted our canopy for travel and when we started to get near our legal weight we built a trailer. The benefit is we can now also carry 1/2 a tonne plus of firewood. Now since the family is shifting out and no longer come out with us as much we find the only reason to take the trailer is for the firewood and the fact we can also carry an extra three jerry cans
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:32

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:32
Sounds like you have a good set up.
We camped light with tents etc for years but I reckon my days with that arrangement are now gone.
So I need a solution for my current arrangement of a ute with a removable alum canopy, and Vista RV van; which we like.
TJ
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Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:52

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:52
The GVM/GCM upgrade thing is starting to become a farce, with Federal and State Govts, Vehicle Standards authorities, and aftermarket installers, all at odds over upgrades.

There is a move on, to totally ban GCM upgrades. AFAIC, GVM upgrades over manufacturers ratings should be outlawed, too - but aftermarket suspension suppliers are having a great little rort, by still carrying out GVM upgrades - by taking weight from reduced towed loads, and adding it to the tow vehicle.

This is not strictly legal, IMO - and it is certainly not supported by the vehicle manufacturers.

At the end of the day, a vehicle is engineered to carry a set maximum vehicle load (GVW) and a set all-up load (GCM). These figures should never be exceeded.

To increase a vehicles carrying capacity by taking some of the towing capacity weight, and adding it to the weight the vehicle is actually carrying, is straight-out wrong, and a travesty of engineering design and calculations.

But there's plenty of aftermarket suspension companies out there, who will happily sell you mega-buck suspension upgrades, along with a GVM upgrade, over the original manufacturers specified GVM - and then let you carry the can for axle breakages, chassis fractures, and other costly disasters - that are easily avoided by sticking to the manufacturers recommendations.

The bottom line is, if you end up with serious structural or axle damage to your vehicle, after a GVM/GCM upgrade, it's so easy for aftermarket suspension suppliers to say the problem is a result of vehicle abuse, and wipe their hands of the problem.

GVM upgrades - WTF is going on?

VIC tweaks GVM upgrade laws

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:29

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:29
"There is a move on, to totally ban GCM upgrades. "

Ron,
There has been a clarification to the rules around GVM upgrades. As from July 1st this year, a GVM upgrade cannot increase the manufacturer's GCM.

Prior to July 1, there was an interpretation that allowed the increased GCM - basically the sum of the new GVM plus the max towing mass. In my case with my BT50 the GCM went from 6000kg to 7000kg after a 300kg GVM upgrade! Doesn't make sense and I would never use it.

I believe that that interpretation has been grandfathered for GVM upgrades issued before July 1.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:10

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:10
It's seems ironic that many upgrades are done to enable vehicles to be loaded to the gunnels and travel far and wide over rough roads where stresses are commensurately greater. As you pointed out in Tezza's thread Ron, it's the reverse of how the Army works. Seems we're expecting too much even if most get away with it without major problems. Beef it up by all means but also dropping your load when off the blacktop would seem logical.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:40

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:40
I am aware of the GCM argument and I have read conflicting reports (as usual!)
But I dont need GCM increase. I am about 800 below std GCM with my set up.
And I can accept the argument that extra load = extra stress.
But the 'do nothing' case, means I do nothing.
TJ
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Reply By: Bobjl - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 20:15

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 20:15
Ron, I note in the RV Daily link you provided, that they have a special comment at the end of the article that says.... if you struggle to stay within your weight limits it is worth considering a GVM Upgrade
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Follow Up By: RMD - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 07:36

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 07:36
If a Iveco Daily is so called upgraded and the axle or chassis breaks I would think you have a bigger problem than a smaller 4wd would. Maybe the people who sell them are also "under the spell".
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 11:42

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 11:42
RMD, the Iveco Daily 4x4 can already be upgraded with a factory option, so no need for aftermarket upgrade.

Macca.
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Reply By: Member - Outback Gazz - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 20:22

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 20:22
Here's my idea of a GVM upgrade :)



https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjGnPXtgu7jAhWRT30KHdWIA3UQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fhennesseyperformance.com%2Fvehicles%2Fford%2Ff-150-raptor%2F2017-ford-f-150-raptor%2Fvelociraptor-6x6%2F&psig=AOvVaw2CiS4lDmIVqmfTlCvRhcob&ust=1565173243736541
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:25

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:25
Gazz, that's a pretty expensive suspension upgrade!! LOL

"The Hennessy Velociraptor 6x6 starts from US$349,000" !!!

What does it end up at, with all the "extras" ?? LOL

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:38

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 21:38
"What does it end up at, with all the "extras" ?? LOL"

Ron - about $1800 over my budget and also 4 inches too long for my garage


Cheers

Gazz
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Follow Up By: Jackolux - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 00:47

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 00:47
A Mate had a Lovells GVM upgrade done on his Hilux 3.5T , I had a GVM upgrade for my Dmax all ok so far .
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:15

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:15
Jackolux - "So far". Yes, that's the right qualifying term. The dictionary says "so far" means, "to a certain limited extent".

Limit your loading and treatment of your vehicles to the manufacturers rating, along with careful driving, and your vehicles will last.

But many chassis and axle problems are slow to appear, and insidious - until they show up with a major and sudden failure.

Probably surprisingly to a lot of 4WD owners, some of the worst component overload damage, can come from repeated, heavily-loaded "landings" into fairly shallow dips on reasonably good roads, at speed - not as much,as the sudden, bone jarring potholes, or gutters.

However, constant, severe corrugations, taken at excessive speed, with excessive tyre pressures, are the final nail in the coffin, for overloaded components.
That's what the manufacturers use in proving grounds, testing components to destruction, in accelerated lifespan testing.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:52

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:52
I like the suggestion (& what a brute machine!), but Wifey says "no". Bugger.
But I'm willing to take the risk.with the GVM upgrade; unless I can find a suitable alternative.
There are risks of vehicular damage everywhere, especially when one travels remote. That's life.
My last trip was 11,000km. Probably 50% dirt roads of all different qualities.
TJ
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Reply By: Gbc.. - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 05:51

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 05:51
Considering how a factory hilux rides empty, I guarantee putting even harder rear springs in it isn’t going to impress the boss in the comfort department.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:56

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 17:56
Agree.
I'm guessing there are varying degrees of being 'not impressed".
I'm hoping for the lighter version. Ha ha.

TJ
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Follow Up By: Gbc.. - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:39

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:39
Just keep a heap of ballast in the back when you are not in touring trim. We use 20l square drums of water strapped together. They fit perfectly between the wheel arches of a factory hilux tub. I know you have a dropside tray though so you’ll have to invent your own.
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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 07:06

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 07:06
I know it is an easy answer but maybe lots of people should either leave a lot of crap at home and travel lighter or invest in a larger/ heavier vehicle to do the job.
On our recent three month 10,000 k trip we saw hundreds of vehicles obviously too small and possibly overloaded for the trip, lots of mid sized utes that were starting to bend and about half a dozen that had done so to the point of total failure.
This was right across the spectrum from single vehicles to those towing camper trailers and vans.
We've been travelling outback since the mid 70's and the sheer numbers of people travelling these days is mind boggling but many try to do too much in too small a time frame with too much gear in too small a vehicle for the job.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 08:45

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 08:45
Peter - Spot on. I've seen at least 3 dual-cab traytops with canopies loaded to the hilt, showing signs of chassis bending, just on Cable Beach alone, in the last week.

What gets me, is the number of owners of these vehicles, who had additional items mounted on the top of the rear of the canopy, making the chassis loading pressure situation worse.

Of course, they'd obviously decided that that position was good, because it made for easier access to the items when unloading.

I can remember a couple of farmer mates planing a trip up the CSR in 1989, with the farm HJ75 traytop.
They thought up a big list of all the things they reckon they'd need - everything from every possible spare, through to bog chains - then when the HJ75 started buckling at the knees, they thought they'd better put her over the weighbridge!

The look on their faces was priceless when the CBH weighbridge scales showed the HJ75 at 3500kgs!! - so they had to do a major rethink on what was "necessary".

Then - despite all the careful prep work, they ended up breaking a tie rod halfway up the CSR - and no-one in the party had a spare!
One of the party was then detailed to do a trip to Newman, to pick up a new tie rod!
Such are the vagaries of planning, something always comes out of left field unexpectedly.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Gbc.. - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:19

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:19
I have a twin cab and it looks after me because I don’t ask too much of it. Many people ask way too much of them and pay a high price for their expectation. Unfortunately the vehicles get a bad rep but I haven’t seen many broken ones which weren’t overloaded or bashed.
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Reply By: Matthew G3 - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:52

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 09:52
Trevor I have got the Pedders GVM upgrade on an 18 dual cab Dmax with an alum canopy and love it. It has a better ride than a bare ute. it still has a bit of weight on it from all of the accessories and canopy which is just 500kg. Bullbar winch ,side steps, towbar, long range tank, 50ltr water tank under canopy, fridge on a drop down slide and 2 agm batt. Towing the Tvan [ball weight of about 150kg] from Marla to Oonadatta the front shocks got 29degrees and back 34degrees with Tvan 44 on Koni shocks tested with I R gun with ambient of 22 sitting on 75-80kmh. I was 250kg under the GVM.

Matt
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Follow Up By: RMD - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:37

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:37
Matthew
It is the terrain and speed/frequency and amplitude of the shock absorber action which causes heat, not so much the load at all.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:06

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:06
Thanks Matty - love the reply.
Good to know the Pedders will possibly do the trick if I go that way.
I have a similar level of stuff as you have described above, and I need to be legal.
I dont easily see what can be eliminated.
I'm hoping to post a list of stuff I bring with corresponding weights in one of these posts.
This is for the readers to pick over. Ha ha.
Cheers
TJ


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Follow Up By: Matthew G3 - Wednesday, Aug 14, 2019 at 09:54

Wednesday, Aug 14, 2019 at 09:54
Trevor I had GVM and all the bar work plus tank done before I bought it, but was driving around for 6 months before I got the canopy and it rode better than my wifes car a PJ Ranger Hirider dual cab 4x2 with bulbar,80kg canopy, engel, black heavy tray mat, and ARB rear step tow bar. I was surprised how settled the back was compered to our other ute.

Matt
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Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:29

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 12:29
It's interesting to read through some of the States vehicle registration authorities requirements for GVM upgrades.

S.A.'s requirements are listed below, and they are clearly written and easily understood.

In the case of a GVM upgrade that increases the load rating of the rear axle, beyond the manufacturers original maximum load specification, the following applies in S.A. ... (LVES is Light Vehicle Engineering Signatory)

S.A. - Light vehicle mass re-rating


QUOTE:

"When the GVM upgrade exceeds the original manufacturer’s specified axle load capacity:

This will require an upgrade of the vehicle springs to a higher load rating than the standard springs.

The LVES will assess the suitability of the modified suspension for the GVM proposed.

The LVES will address the structural adequacy of the vehicle at the higher GVM.

The LVES will address the braking performance at the higher GVM. This will likely require testing of the vehicle at laden mass.

The LVES will assess the axles and suspension components to cope with the increased loadings beyond the OEM ratings. This will be likely to require detailed engineering analysis addressing stress and fatigue elements.

The LVES will assess the wheel and tyre loading requirements, and if these differ from the OEM tyre placard, then a new placard must be fitted to the vehicle replacing the OEM placard.

In addition to the above requirements, the following criteria may also be specified on the SOR depending on the modifications proposed:

Where the GVM increase is greater than 20%, evidence to confirm the braking system has been tested at a higher GVM including full brake test report as required by Fact Sheet MR132 Brake system test procedure, when loaded to the new GVM.

If the vehicle is fitted with any form of Electronic Stability control, evidence will be required that the system has not been affected by an increase in GVM.

A vehicle modified where the total lift (tyres plus suspension plus body) is more than 50mm beyond the original manufacturer’s standard height will require a Lane Change Test as required by Fact Sheet MR807."

END QUOTE.

Now, I'm of the opinion, that there's a lot of box-ticking going on here, with these authorised LVES's - much the same as building engineers, in the pocket of major builders, have been box-ticking dodgy new apartments in Sydney and Melbourne.

I cannot see where these vehicle engineers (LVES's) have the ability, or are doing the extensive and major testing required, to ensure that modified 4WD vehicle chassis' and axles, have the necessary durability to cope with substantial GVM upgrades.

It would seem to me to be pretty easy, as an engineer, once you acquired the necessary LVES qualification, to become a box ticker for the suspension installers, without doing major durability testing.

The Govt is merely throwing responsibility onto the LVES's for any structural or durability problems that arise, and the LVES's can simply come back and say the vehicle was being abused.

There does not appear to be a robust enough system in place, whereby LVES's must provide documented strength testing, to back up what they are signing off on.

To my mind, any axle that is uprated in carrying capacity over the manufacturers original load limit, needs to be trussed in a substantial manner, to provide that extra strength and durability. I see no sign of any suspension upgrade operators doing this.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:37

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:37
Ron, just had my 2002 GU Patrol 4.8 GVM upgraded, the engineer did the brake test fully loaded, also the rear axle was braced. As you say, "I see no sign of any suspension upgrade operators doing this", well ATOC in Melbourne do and was required by the engineer. I have no idea how the other suspension places get away with out bracing the diff. I also braced the front diff at the same time, just being prudent.
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: RMD - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 17:14

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 17:14
I agree there is a lot of ticking going on and sure full testing and bracing isn't being considered.
The rear axle is simply a piece of steel tube used for a purpose. Lots of similar stressed steel tubes used in our society. Bigger ones on wind turbines fatigue and crack and the whizzy bit has a nasty accident. They are computer analysed for durability but not actually tested unless a giant does a fatigue test. Rear axle tubes are subject to fatigue testing all their life, go past the limits and the result is obvious.
As John mentioned above, bracing of the rear axle tube would be a basic requirement if the bearings are deemed to be ok for purpose and over design loads applied.
Someone above mentioned it rides well and loves it, all good, but we aren't talking about the ride quality as it is a secondary consideration to the unit being able to carry more than designed. anything with longer travel, relatively compliant suspension suspension for the load is a plus. My 6x4 trailer has done outback work but the suspension and wheels are not as designed.
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Reply By: Dave B18 - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:07

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:07
Would love to see what amount of excess equipment you are carrying. I have a 1 tonne single cab ute with body and small caravan and nowhere near the GVM. Have everything possible money could buy for comfort. 55L water tank under the body, 40L fridge, 150Ah battery, 475W solar panels, Trauma hot water system, 4.5kg LPG. Small caravan weighs in at loaded with water tanks full at 1,222kg.

What do you have loaded you are so overweight?

With the failures seen with GVM upgrades, they shouldn't be allowed. Why wouldn't the vehicle manufacturer make the load capability higher if the vehicle was good for a higher loading.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:13

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:13
G'day Dave.
Have you been over the weighbridge? You haven't a lot less than I carry.
I guess your set-up suits you, and my set-up suits me. Unfortunately my set up doesnt suit Mr Plod, so something has to change.
I hope to post a list of what I carry for others reference.
TJ
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Reply By: Member - Mal and Naomi G - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 23:24

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 23:24
A sideline issue with GVM upgrades Trevor, be aware that in WA definitely, and possibly in other states, your GVM upgrade will not be legal, even though you have a signed copy of the engineer's report with all boxes ticked and a placard pop-riveted to the bodywork somewhere stating the new GVM, until you have the vehicle inspected by a licenced vehicle inspector and take the roadworthy form and your copy of the engineer's report into the motor registration branch and they call up your vehicle's rego details, find the matching copy of the engineer's report sent in by the engineer, shout 'SNAP' and then change the figures beside GVM: on the computer listing of your vehicle's rego! I spent a lot of time researching suspension and GVM upgrades. I was told by everybody their upgrades are 'ADR approved' so you naturally assume they are legally OK, but never once was I told that I had to have the car inspected by a LVI for a roadworthy (this on a 3yo DMAX). Only discovered by accident when got the rego renewal notice about a fortnight after the GVM upgrade and it still showed 2900kgs and not 3300. Called into MRB on day off to ask and was told I had to get car inspected.
Same deal with the long-range fuel tank. I had to go back to the ARB outlet which fitted the tank and he filled out the form, ticked the boxes and signed it while I stood there - why the idiot couldn't have done that and handed it to me when I picked up the car beats me. But anyway, I was lucky, I got the car inspected and the GVM upgrade AND the long-range tank approved by MRB on the one inspection, otherwise I would have been up for 2 inspection fees and 2 booking fees. Have to carry the long-range tank fitter's form in the car at all times and produce it if asked by police or Main Roads officers.
Mal Gill, Bellevue, WA
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Follow Up By: RMD - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 14:01

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 14:01
G'day Mal
Your experience just goes to show the shortcomings of businesses who "trade" in a so called "product", that being GVM upgrades, but fail to actually bring to the customers notice the real requirements and the business action is not genuine and leave many or most at the wrong end of the law when there is an issue.
Not many other things escape proper scrutiny except developers, builders and engineers of high rise units where they all escape, like GVM upgrade mobs seem to do.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 14:26

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 14:26
Trying to get any vehicles major details altered in the registration database, is akin to trying to get your birth certificate altered. It requires MAJOR effort.

I bought an unregistered 5 tonne truck, repaired it to registerable condition, and weighed it to establish correct tare.

The weighbridge tare had a substantial variation (an increase) on the original tare written on the truck, and on the original rego papers.

But when I went to re-register the truck, the DOT W.A. operator ignored the new weighbridge ticket, and simply retained the original tare.

I queried why and she stated she couldn't alter the original tare without "further accompanying documentation" to explain the weight increase.
I didn't press the subject, and left it the record as it was.

I did nothing to increase the tare, it's obvious the original figure was supplied by the dealer when the truck was delivered new, and numerous items had been added to the truck during its life (multiple toolboxes, towbar, etc), that added the extra weight.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:34

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:34
Ron,
There is a current push by the alphabet people to have their birth certificates changed so the M or F at birth is not known. Maybe the vehicle details will follow if certain types of humans get their way. Watch out for who for who is driving!
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Saturday, Aug 10, 2019 at 15:38

Saturday, Aug 10, 2019 at 15:38
What business is that of yours? Your hysteria knows no bounds.
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Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:25

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:25
Thanks Mal - bloody good advice should I go through with GVM upgrade.
Yes, I'm from Kalgoorlie so WA info is relevant.
I dont hear much of the Scalies weighing vehicle/vans over here, but I had a friend who was recently weighed near Adelaide on his way back to Kal. He was just under. Made me nervous!
As my next big-un is over to QLD/NSW through SA, I'd better get compliant I reckon.
In the 'old days' one did not worry about such minor details as being over weight. Many a fishing-camping trip was had 'filled to the gunnels'.
More respect these days.
Cheers
TJ

Trevor&Verna, Kal WA

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FollowupID: 901208

Follow Up By: Member - Mal and Naomi G - Wednesday, Aug 14, 2019 at 22:42

Wednesday, Aug 14, 2019 at 22:42
Good luck with whichever way you jump Trev. I hear occasional tales of WA cops on a lazy day with nothing else to do weighing eastern states' grey nomads heading west at Eucla in the Tojo with the big tandem-axle Jayco hanging off the back and 14ft tinnie and 50hp outboard on Tojo's roof, but no first-hand experience of that. We generally stray into SA and NT at least once a year so like to keep it legal. It's not just being weighted, we recently had to extricate ourselves, car and camper from a situation in the middle of remote WA where, had we been unsuccessful: 1/ I wouldn't be here to write this, and, 2/ it would have cost us a minimum of $8000 to get a 4x4 tilt tray out of Newman to come and rescue us. Try making a claim for 8 grand on your insurance when you also have to 'fess up that 'oh, by the way, we were a little overweight and there's some mods to the vehicle you (insurance company) and the motor reg branch don't know about'.
Cheers
Mal
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FollowupID: 901240

Reply By: nickb - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 18:25

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 18:25
I have a Lovell’s spring and Bilstein shock suspension (gvm rated springs but no paperwork done) in my Ranger. My GVM is 3200kg and I am loaded to 3180kg everyday for work. I am quite happy with the handling and comfort when loaded like thus. With the work canopy removed it is quite stiff in the back but lowering the tyre pressure (from 50psi to 34psi and putting 100-200kg of weight in the back) makes it acceptable considering the canopy is on 99% of the time.

There is no magic suspension that can handle the same when the load changes by ~700kg, that is the compromise you make for having heavy load carrying suspension. You can try airbags but if used incorrectly they are known to contribute to bent chassis’.
AnswerID: 627115

Reply By: Matthew G3 - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 20:05

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 20:05
Trevor I feel sorry for you 31 replys, with only 3 bothered to answer your question. How dare you wanting to make YOUR vehicle legal.
AnswerID: 627119

Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:32

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:32
True story. I've taken a hammering.
Not to worry. I'm half confident that Pedders will not be overly harsh on the ride. Especially if I carry some weight in the unladen ute. I take the canopy off when not travelling as I use the ute as a ute. That would be 80% of the time but 30% of the km. Decisions, decisions.

TJ
Trevor&Verna, Kal WA

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FollowupID: 901210

Reply By: Batt's - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 20:07

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 20:07
You may end up putting a lot of stress on the chassis in front of the springs that's where twin cabs seem to be prone to bending or cracking the chassis.

I would look at how much weight the camper places on the draw bar if may be a lot and you might be able to reduce it by repacking the camper I had a pop top once and it was good with 80kg ball weight something that might be worth experimenting with. You can try weighing it on bathroom scales with a thick piece of ply on it to help protect them. Attach the camper to the car then lower the jockey wheel onto the scales until there is no weight on the tow bar but watch you don't overload the scales.
AnswerID: 627120

Follow Up By: Trevor&Verna - Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:46

Tuesday, Aug 13, 2019 at 18:46
Thanks for the advice Batt.
But I dont have much scope to change my set-up unless I start replacing utes and vans (or get a GVM upgrade). And I like my set up as it provides flexibility as to where we go, and my wife likes it as well. (and sometimes I listen to her).
My ball weight is 150kg (measured - I bought a proper tool to do this). My van (Vista RV) weighs 1500 laden. So that's about the right ratio.
Hopefully I can put a weight manifest on this thread in the near future. Might give others a shock!
Cheers
TJ
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FollowupID: 901212

Follow Up By: Batt's - Thursday, Aug 15, 2019 at 12:09

Thursday, Aug 15, 2019 at 12:09
They do say ball weight is good at 10% of what the vans weighs, you can go less if the set up and road conditions suit.
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FollowupID: 901245

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