Coopers versus BFG tyres

Submitted: Tuesday, Jul 23, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1554 Views:2685 Replies:15 FollowUps:17
This Thread has been Archived
Sorry tyres again - but I can't make up my mind between these two - as I can get them for the same price. Which to buy the Cooper ST or the BFG AT. Use will be 70% road mostly as shopping trolley - palanning trips to Cape York and Kimberleys. Want a tyre that will be good on the bitumen, wear well and resistant to staking (if that is possible). Size will be 265*70, 16 on a Prado.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Thommo - Tuesday, Jul 23, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Jul 23, 2002 at 00:00
I am running Cooper Discovery S/T's on an RV6 Prado (235/85/R16). I find them slightly noisier on the tar compared to the originals, not as sticky on wet roads, but not alarmingly so. In the rough rocky bits and mud, they are very good. I don't think you will go wrong with either tyre.
AnswerID: 5074

Reply By: Pat - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Show ponies use Coopers and they are good for circle work. and if you want to go 'bush' the BFG's will probably do the trick... but if you want real tyres then get a set of Dunlop Road Grippers (8ply) and really get set...

Patrick
AnswerID: 5084

Reply By: winaje - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
I agree completely with Thommo's verdict. I am happy with the Coopers. There seems to be a (fanatical) following for any brand, but have just got the Coopers, so am fairly unbiased. Bill Church
AnswerID: 5085

Reply By: Steve - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
I've been running BFG A/T's on my 80 series Landcruiser for the past 3 years, and am still on my first set. I've racked up 50,000km on
them, travelling through Birdsville, Simpson Desert, Maree, Broken Hill, Stockton Beach, loads of trips through the Blue Mountains west of
Sydney, etc. - no punctures, no sidewall damage, and minimal tread wear (even after all the gibbers). While at Birdsville, every group we
encountered had stories of at least one member having punctures, and the only people we came across without such experience were those
also using BFG's. I was put onto them by a friend who grew up on a property in northwest NSW and they swore by the BFGs for
everything. I'll be replacing these (when they eventually need it) with BFGs again, going up to 285/75R16 from the 265/75R16, and would
certainly recommend them. Road noise is slightly higher than standard, but hardly noticeable. Grip on the road also seems better -
probably the extra depth of the tread grooves allows better dispersion of water in the wet.

AnswerID: 5087

Follow Up By: Savvas - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi Steve .... How much tread do you have left on the BFG's after 50,000?
0
FollowupID: 2169

Follow Up By: Steve - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Savvas, there's around 6-7 mm left (slightly over 50% of the original tread depth).
0
FollowupID: 2170

Reply By: Damien - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Have to agree with Steve here. I have BFG's & couldn't be happier, no punctures, great wear & exceptional performance.
Having said that though, i'm sure the Coopers would be quite adequate as well.
AnswerID: 5088

Reply By: mal58 - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
When I went to replace the tyres on my Prado, I had the same questions. If you stick with the 265*70 R16 then I think you'll find that you can't get the Cooper ST in that size. You however can get the BFG's in that size though, but my experience was that they were $40 - $50 more per tyre (~$277ea) than the next size up viz 265*75 R16 (~$235ea). If you go up to the 265*75, the problem is that the tyre diameter increase is 27 mm, which depending on state ADR / roadworthy regulations is greater than the allowed legal 15 mm increase. Having said that, if you took a sample at random of mid size 4by's with A/T tyres (Prados, Pajeros, Jackaroos, etc), then you would find most have tyres that are greater than 15mm over the vehicle (ADR27) compliance plate. Difficult decision. Also, make sure your insurance company will cover you for what you want to do.
Rgds, Mal58
AnswerID: 5089

Reply By: Rod - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Beddo, Blow outs, punctures, stakes, nics, cuts I've had them all with BFG's. I've had two sets (33 x 12.5) and I've just bought a third set.

My BFG's have worn well the current set has approx 60,000ks with probably 20,000 to go.

I've looked several times at Coopers but the con of 80,000k guaranttee does not suck me in, as the slightest nic on the tyre will void the guaranttee, and I know damage will happen.

Plus with Coopers you have to have the balanced every 10,000k's (more expense). My BFG's have only been re-balanced after being repaired from the previously stated damage.
AnswerID: 5091

Follow Up By: Exploroz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Rod, my thoughts on the Cooper's regular balancing condition is that it is preventative maintenance and its quite a smart idea when you think about it. People tend to fuss about buying their tyres and then forget about them once they're on. Being "forced" to balance them regularly, may also mean you get a realignment more often too. All this adds up to a better, more even drive and obviously your tyres stand a better chance of longevity if looked after like this.
0
FollowupID: 2184

Follow Up By: Rod - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Yep! Fair enough comment. But like I said my BFG's have/are wearing well, no uneaveness, scalloping etc though I do keep an eye on them like everything else for preventative maintenance.
0
FollowupID: 2185

Reply By: Cashy - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Beddo,

I would recommend the BFG AT's but I would go for the 265/75 size as it will be cheaper then the 265/70 size. Also the larger size is classified as a light truck (LT) tyre and the 265/70 is classified as a passanger tyre. The LT tyre is usually has a 3ply sidewall on the BFG's rather then the 2 ply on the passanger tyre. This gives better protection against staking. I run the 265/75 on my Prado and have currently got 45,000k from them and they have about 60-70% left. I have only had one puncture in that time. It is important to rotate them regularily to keep the wear even and also to include the spare tyre(s).

Hope this helps.
Cashy
AnswerID: 5092

Follow Up By: Mal58 - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Cashy (and Beddo), 265*70 R16 in BFG T/A KO is a LT tyre. Check out http://www.bfgoodrichtires.com/ and drill down to the T/A KO tyres and look at the PDF file. I think you might be thinking of the Bridgestone A/T tyre in the 265*70 R16 which has a P, not a LT casing.
Rgds, Mal58
0
FollowupID: 2172

Reply By: Mark - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Beddo,
I am in the same boat and tossing up between BFG AT's or Cooper S/Ts.
I have done quite a bit of searching on the various forums and it seems that most are in favor of the BFG's. The only concern is that I have seen quite a bit of negative feedback on the later BFG KO's with many reports of the tyres splitting at the sidewall, it seems like it could be a batch problem but how do you tell. There are a couple of interesting threads on the Overlander website regarding this issue. http://forums.overlander.com.au/ search for "bloody BFGs"
All seem happy with the Cooper S/Ts but have not yet put any real mileage on them, only negative it seems is they are nosier on the blacktop. Must say I am swinging in favour of the S/Ts.
AnswerID: 5107

Follow Up By: Beddo - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Funny that you mention the sides splitting on BFG AT's - I called a number of tyre places out west and one in Cairns who deal with both tyres (so they are not bias). You are correct about the side walls as BFG AT have recently been widened without doing anything to the wall structure the result has been the delaminating or side wall cracks - a result of excess heat build up with thicker wider tread. The Cooper ST from what all the dealers say are the way to go - a couple of guys said also that the wall thickness between the two was not an issue and said the coopers actually were better in the side walls when you compare the two tyres together. Anyway seeing I have a Surf with the Prado running gear I also had to be sure that my clearances were Ok to run 75's but I've heard fron Cairns that fitting these to this model results in the tyres touching the guards on full lock. So I'm going to put up with what I have until they have worn out completely - my trip to Cape York will do that.
Thanks everyone for your advice, Beddo
PS. or I can give it a lift of a few inches.
Thanks
0
FollowupID: 2192

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 24, 2002 at 00:00
Whichever one you choose, you can always try the other brand next time. The truth about 4WD tyres is that you will always be buying them!
AnswerID: 5121

Follow Up By: Rod - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Very true Michelle, very true.
0
FollowupID: 2182

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
To clarify further - we have used numerous full sets of BFGs and now we're on our second set of Coopers (by the way, if you're looking at the STs you must make sure you are buying the 10ply not the 8ply). You can't avoid wear and tear on tyres but I actually think that the technology in these 2 tyres is fairly similar and the popularity of them both in the market indicates that they are the top choices. However the single factor that will make an astonishing difference between one or the other brand will be your driving style. Talk to other drivers and you will see that after a lot of outback experience drivers tend to work out how to keep from getting flats and stakes etc. Selecting the combination of correct tyre pressures and driving speed for a particular track is the key - and also the skill of the driver in picking the best drive path (ie. not too close to stakes, and not over the top of fallen branches, not heavily braking, not taking corners too fast). It's a bit like "personal responsibility", you can't always blame the tyre manufacturers for all your flat tyres!
AnswerID: 5125

Follow Up By: Dean- Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Ive noticed your comments in the past and in this article regarding the Cooper ST's, you have say you must buy the 10 ply and not the 8 ply, obviously the 10 ply is stronger than the 8 ply but not that much, have you had some major problems with 8 ply tyres or just the ST's.
0
FollowupID: 2186

Follow Up By: Exploroz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Dean - choosing the 10ply means you get an extra 1ply on the sidewall so overall this tyre has the strongest rating.
0
FollowupID: 2189

Follow Up By: Mark - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Michelle,
When you mention 10 ply are you refering to an LT tyre ? reason I ask is I was under the impression that the BFG AT's were 3 ply & the Cooper S/T are 2 ply. Perhaps this applies only to the passenger rated tyres as I believe the Cooper S/T's are only available in a passenger tyre for the size I require 235/70 R16. I'm a bit confused over the ply ratings ?
0
FollowupID: 2193

Follow Up By: Exploroz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Mark, now you are confusing me! My comment was made because many people don't realise that the Cooper ST comes in both an 8ply and a 10ply and when you are comparing tyres it is important to compare apples for apples. I mentioned it initially because most stores don't stock the10ply but if you are serious about tyre wear, then the the 10ply are the way to go and you may need to order them in. We are currently using the Cooper ST 10ply and looking at putting on STTs to try next. I'm sorry I don't know about any 2ply or 3ply ratings. I will be talking to the tyre experts in preparation of the Tyre Hot Topic feature which will be the next one to be published and they might help explain things. David might add to this if he knows more than I do (not usual!).
0
FollowupID: 2194

Follow Up By: Mark - Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00
Michelle,

Sorry for the confusion but from what I can gather the Cooper S/T are only 2 ply in a Passenger ( S rated ) tyre. To get the 8 & 10 ply you refer too I would have to move to a Light truck rated ( N or Q rated ) tyre, unfortunately they don't seem to make and LT to suit the Disco. I did a bit more searching on the web and found thew spec's on the S/T's
http://www.coopertires.com.au/tyres/st_specs.htm the Ply rating is not mentioned for the Passenger sizes but I have been informed its 2 ply only. I talked to my insurer (NRMA) and they said I should stick to "S" rated tyres to avoid cover problems, so it looks like i'm stuck with the 2 ply.
0
FollowupID: 2208

Reply By: MikeyS - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Michelle, I agree completely. Beddo, don't agonize over the decision. Heads/ Coopers or tails/BFG. (Although some would argue heads/BFG tails/Coopers) Despite what the marketing people will have you believe, you will not be making a mistake by going for either brand. Besides, only you will know which one you prefer after having tried both brands.
AnswerID: 5133

Reply By: Beddo - Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Jul 25, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks all, I did a bit of research by calling remote dealers who deal with both tyres (see my reply earlier - should of put it down here, Oh well). Heard the BFG AT have an issue with side walls after they changed the design on them slightly ! All said the Coopers were the way to go. Anyway also found out that the 75's with my Surf KZN185 will not give me a good clearance between the guards (will be slight rub on full lock) unless I put a lift kit in. Thanks again all, Beddo
AnswerID: 5144

Reply By: Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00
I put a set of Cooper St's on my 80 Series after using BFG ATs for over 20 years. These have been on for a year now and have just notched up 50 k I am very happy with them, thier wet road bitumen performance and steering ability is far superior to the BFGs, a very important issue for me as I drive up the Kuranda range to my training tracks regularly. They are also far superior in mud as they don't clog as the BFG ATs do and thier side grippers work well. They also steer very well on dirt. I was advised by my BFG dealer, who is a personal friend, 12 months ago not to by his BFG's as there was an issue with sidewall cracking and tread chiping since Michelin took BFG over. My freind rang me the other day to say that without ever admitting anything was wrong, BFG claim these problems had now been fixed. In closing I know from personal experience the Cooper ST is the best compromise tyre for my application. I only wish they made a 32 x 11.50 x 15. Cheers Rob.
AnswerID: 5169

Follow Up By: Rob G - Wednesday, Jul 31, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 31, 2002 at 00:00
hey rob. just to chime in on the ply debate. did you go with 8 or 10 ply?

cheers.
0
FollowupID: 2280

Reply By: Guy - Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Jul 26, 2002 at 00:00
As Michelle said it is important to have "10 plies" or higher, COOPERS. The rubber on the "8 plies" is poor and I cheaped all my "8 plies" Cooper tyres after 20 000 km. Now I have "10 plies" Cooper, the rubber is a lot harder, no more chipping and punctures. Compare to our friend, we had NO puncture with our "10 plies" Cooper and our friend had two BFG shredded to pieces on the stone roads from Gove to Normanton.(2 000 km around the Gulf country)
AnswerID: 5173

Follow Up By: Anothersteveo - Monday, Jul 29, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Jul 29, 2002 at 00:00
you guys have got to much money i use to run bfges but they ware out to quick and rbleepin the mud so i give hankook tyres a go and have never looked back about $50 cheaper as well
i have been 2 cape york frazer ect and never had a punture and they lasted me 3 years 80`000 ks very good so why bother speed all the money 4 the name on the tyre

anothersteveo
0
FollowupID: 2252

Follow Up By: Peter - Tuesday, Jul 30, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Jul 30, 2002 at 00:00
"anothersteveo", try next time some real 4WD tracks for 1000 of kms, with corragations like thwe size of a meatloaf and stones like your fist during 1300 km with a car and equipment which is worth $60000. See if you want to leave your $60000 investement in the bush because you did not want to spend and extra $500 on quality tyres. An extra $500 makes sens for a $60000 investement and it certainly does not make sens for a rust bucket. I agree with you
0
FollowupID: 2262

Follow Up By: Anothersteveo- Tuesday, Jul 30, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Jul 30, 2002 at 00:00
ifu had read my letter it would have told u i had done a least 80,000 ks and not punture and yes i have been over very rough roads it looks like you havnt been to the cape its very corrigated up there beleve me.Not only that but i have a brother that has been in the tyre game 4 at least 10 years so i went on what he thought and he has not steered me wrong im just saying that u dont have to by the big name tyres to get the same quality in tyres.
acuatly i wood like to hear from other people who have hankooks on
0
FollowupID: 2266

Follow Up By: Rob G - Wednesday, Jul 31, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Jul 31, 2002 at 00:00
i used to run hankooks (Z46s) on my old 40 series. they were ok. got a few punctures towards the end of their life, as you do. thought they were pretty ordinary on wet bitumen though, although rear drum brakes wouldn't have helped the cause. clogged up a fair bit in mud.
0
FollowupID: 2281

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)