Camper Trailers

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 20:02
ThreadID: 20481 Views:4675 Replies:5 FollowUps:0
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We are planning a big trip next year Perth, Kimberlys inc Gibb River Road and Kimberly plateau, N.T. Alice, Gunbarrel and home. Was thinking about taking a Jayco Eagle O.R. but after reading Tessa's experience I am thinking twice about it. Maybe a less comfortable Kampa or Pioneer is the way to go. Does anyone have any helpfull comments?
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Reply By: Member - Nissan Gnome - Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 21:01

Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 21:01
Lewp we have a tambo camper. It has seen some rough roads (although not up that way) and I have no complaints. They are an advertiser on this site I think. We are very happy with the service and standard of finish etc. At about $9000 (when we purchased) for top of the range I think they are good value for money too. Wish I was coming with you!!
AnswerID: 98552

Reply By: paulpp - Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 21:55

Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 21:55
Greetings

Off road camper trailer choice:- (In brief)

Suggest you join this group. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/campertrailers/

1. Hard Floor -
Relativley easy to put up
Independant suspension
Nice kitchen setup
Can be heavey (over 1,000kg laden)
Limited storage space
Expensive

2. Soft floor -
Lots of storage
Take longer to put up
Cheaper ( you pay for what you get mostly)
Basic suspension in standard form
Usually lighter (under 1,000kg laden)

Most important, from my point of view, is suspension and brakes. Mine as an example, has trailing arms, coil springs, panhard rod and gas shock absorbers. Good suspension stops things from breaking (trailer and contents) and makes towing a pleasure. Over ride brakes as a minimum and preferably electric brakes, no matter what the trailer weight.

The type of trailer will be dictated by your tow vehicles permitted ball weights and towing weights. If you load up the trailer draw bar with heavey stuff the ball weight can be quite high.

My brief thoughts

Regards

Paul
AnswerID: 98567

Reply By: jenkie - Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 23:03

Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005 at 23:03
Off road camper trailer. The site on yahoo gave us a lot of info. We would not even think about taking our off road dove on that sort of trip. It needs repairs anytime we take it off the bitumin. We have had a fibreglass off road trailer for the last fifteen years. Been to the cape all Nt and the Kimberleys and all the main Qld islands. Fraser once a year since 1988.. Last September purchased a new off road trakabout for a trip in the same area uou are planning in April this year. The only reason we replaced the fibreglass one was that we wanted a bed left in place and not have to put down the airbeds etc especially now that we go without kids and one that we can put the boat on instead of putting on the roof of the car. One day we will get around to selling the ROad and Track although at 265 kilos compared to 700 kilos unloaded it was certainly a little easier to pull on the beach in the soft sand.
Have fun looking at all options
Jenkie
Jenkie

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AnswerID: 98581

Reply By: duncs - Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 17:13

Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 17:13
Lewp,

So far the advice above is pretty good, but with one exception people have avoided naming a brand.

I have a Trak Shak. Bouhgt new in 96 it has since been on many long and short trips in pretty rough country. Cape York, Simpson, Lake Eyre etc. On our last trip which was mostly black top we spent a couple of days driveing through the Vic High Country. In short the trailer goes everywhere the Patrol does and nothing has broken.

It is a soft floor camper but when folded has a hard top. This keeps the beds both dust and water free. It also leaves the entire 7x4 trailer for gear storage. It has a kitchen mounted on the tailgate which is easily accesed for lunch stops etc. Beds remain made and are off the ground. It is quick and easy to set up. It can be set up with as little as two pegs in the ground if a quick stop is required. Once set up you can access gear stored in the trailer without going outside. The trailer has room to carry 12 jerry cans and can have a boat rack fitted.

They are made in Adelaide and have a website well worth a visit. You have probably guessed I love mine but I travel with a family. Spend plenty of time shopping CT's are great, but get one that suits you. Remember you will spend more time living in it than you do shopping for it.

Have fun looking
Duncs
AnswerID: 98701

Reply By: Member - Steve- Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 17:48

Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 17:48
Goodaye,

We have a All Terrain Offroad Camper made in Sydney which we have towed for 10's of thousands of KM's through the deserts and a lot of dirt & rocks beyond.

It has a soft floor, HD leaf springs, overide disk brakes and all steel construction which equates to a heavy but bullet proof trailer that has never let us down. Being steel if it did break I could weld it back together with the welding gear I carry and a couple of batteries.

In the rough stuff we maintain the bearings etc regularly which is really the only thing can fail.

It takes about 5 mins from pull up to ready to sleep and about 15 mins to pack up.

We tow it with a 3.0l manual GU with a 7" lift 33" tyres and a ARB roof rack and regularly return abot 18L per 100km either in the bush or at 110km/hr on the blacktop.

For mine its the type of trailer you need for serious outback exploring.

See Ya In the Scrub

Steve Hedges

AnswerID: 98708

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