Hella Plugs Update and Experience

Submitted: Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 12:37
ThreadID: 24415 Views:4244 Replies:3 FollowUps:11
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Hi all, after my previous post on Hella plugs and their worth, and with most people saying they were an major upgrade on the Waeco, I have done some testing.

I bought a Hella plug for the ridiculous price of $16.50 and went to change over my waeco plug. It was a disaster! They are poorly designed for anything but the thinnest of wires, and come with fiddly, crappy little parts that make screwing the lugs down a nightmare.

After 30 minutes, I gave up.

Next I used the Hella copy I bought at supercheap for $2.50 (as per the reccomendation from some bright fella on here). Took me 37.43 seconds to put together. Plugged in and it's as snug as a bug in a rug.

So for my experience, you get a better product for 1/7th the price in "this case". I cannot comment on running quality as yet, but will keep you posted. I wiggled, jiggled and shook the plug and it worked a treat, so, so far so good.

Cheerio
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Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:10

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:10
Yeah, aren't those hella plugs a PAIN IN THE REAR END to wire up with decent wire!

I switched mine over to the clipsal two prong 12vDC plug. (looks like a power point). Takes decent guage wire no probs and the wires just screw in like any other clipsal power point. Never shakes out, sits flush on the side of the cargo area so it doesn't get knocked or broken by gear flying around and will take HEAPS of load with melting.
AnswerID: 118754

Follow Up By: BenSpoon - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:43

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:43
I've done the same- Also got some fat 50A figure 8 cable and have made a 5m extension lead which comes out of an anderson plug at the back of my car, and terminates in a female 12V socket, which I plug the fridge into. It lets me easily stick my fridge on the other side of the car at night so Im not woken up by a compressor, and there is never an issue with volt drop.
I've noticed more and more of the gennies being made with the same "low voltage" plugs and sockets, so the move to these is well worth it.
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FollowupID: 373943

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:46

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:46
they're the stuff they use for 32volt systems
from what i see, they are still not as good as the enderson plug....but all i use is the 32v stuff
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FollowupID: 373952

Follow Up By: BenSpoon - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:08

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:08
The benefit I saw of using the low voltage sockets was they are reuseable. The anderson plugs needed to have the lugs crimped, whereas the low voltage sockets have screw down connectors. That and mounting an anderson plug on the wall of a boot compartment (where I have the socket for running the fridge in car) would mean opening a window to get at it each time i wanted to disconnect it, instead of just a yank on the power cord. That said, I have 4 anderson connectors around the car.
Andersons (depending on size) are typically good for 50+ Amps. Low voltage sockets I recall had a max 15A stamp on them.
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FollowupID: 373957

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:19

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:19
"from what i see, they are still not as good as the enderson plug"
I've got to admit I was a little dubious about them at first glance, but I was desperate as my fridge kept on cutting out while traveling (the hella plug was fubar). They just are SO simple but work so well, they are a very tight fitting.

I've never used the anderson type plugs, I've got the one 2 pin clipsal and all the rest are std cigarette lighter plugs as all my charges, accessories etc have those ends and camp lights and air mattress compressors etc are not used while travelling and are not critical.

I've got three lighter plugs in the back, and one under the dash for the notebook charger. Strangley enough I don't have any dramas with the good quality cigaretter lighter type plugs, in fact the only reason I had to change was because my fridge/cooler draws over 8 amps and it was melting normal ciggy plugs! LOL.
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FollowupID: 373962

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Wednesday, Jul 06, 2005 at 15:57

Wednesday, Jul 06, 2005 at 15:57
A. You can buy the Anderson plug pins separately to reuse the housings if crimped.

B. If you solder rather than crimp them you get to reuse them anyway.

Dave
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FollowupID: 374271

Reply By: Rosco - Bris. - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:35

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:35
Now that's interesting. I found the reverse to apply.

I use Hella type fittings throughout the vehicle and I decided to make a little adaptor thingy to plug into the Hella socket and end with a conventional cigar lighter type socket.

Bought a cheap job from Supa Crap, only to find it a heap of junk. Then went to Repco and bought a genuine jobby.

Found it to be much better with decent screw down fittings to take a reasonable gauge wire.

Cheers
AnswerID: 118761

Follow Up By: WheelTravel - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:36

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 15:36
Can I ask why the SuperCheap one was supercrap? I am interested to know as it seems like it's fine. It is certainly better than the Waeco one so far as it doesn't blow a bloody fuse when I wiggle it, or plug it in and out.

Getting the thicker Waeco wire in the Hella plug was physically impossible. I'm sure I will find a use for it, but it won't be for plugging in the Waeco.

Cheers
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FollowupID: 373965

Follow Up By: Rosco - Bris. - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 16:22

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 16:22
The Supa Crap one I got was very cheap and nasty and didn't have the capacity to connect decent gauge wire. The other .. (may have been Narva rather than Hella .. can't remember) was much better quality and had 240V type connectors and screws so it was easy to adequately anchor the wires in place.

All in all a quality product as compared to the el cheepo jobbies.

Cheers
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FollowupID: 373973

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:47

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 13:47
I have only ever used the Merit style plug & socket as distributed by Piranha.

They are simple to use, connect positively and do not vibrate out.

Merit Plug & Socket
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

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AnswerID: 118764

Follow Up By: Fast_Patrol - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:07

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:07
I agree totally with this - have 6 in my car!

Also, the plug on the Waeco fridge is also a merit plug.

Cheers
Andrew
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FollowupID: 373947

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:48

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:48
dont scroll down...you will all run out and buy the 12volt blender
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FollowupID: 373953

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:50

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:50
and for any "limp wrist" blokes out there they also have a 12volt hair drier
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FollowupID: 373954

Follow Up By: brett - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 20:32

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 20:32
At a guess I'd say those Merit plugs are the same as a Hella plug. Never had a problem with the hella plugs, you won't get a huge gauge wire into them but remember they are only rated to 8amps. HAd no trouble with the wire on the Waeco lead. For the heavy duty stuff use a Anderson. The Narva version of the hella plug are quite good and are only around $6. In Sydney the genuine Hella's are about $10, if your paying $16 I think they're getting at you.
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FollowupID: 374010

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