4wd 1st aid kits

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 13:41
ThreadID: 30098 Views:1898 Replies:9 FollowUps:8
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hi,
wanting to buy a first aid kit for our travels and have priced one from red cross for $119 that comes in a bag and a St john one for $88 that comes in hard carry box (which id prefer)....
Just wanting peoples ideas on what is good to take apart from the usual standard stuff.....(my hubby and myself both have 1st aid certificates.)
Ive been told chalk tablets,cold/flu,antibiotics,asthma(for me),chlorhexidine (wound wipe)....anything else apart from the obvious gear...........any ideas will help!
Laura B

HAPPY INSIDE WHEN IM OUTSIDE
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Reply By: signman - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 13:48

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 13:48
It's probably better (and make work out cheaper) to do your own. Get a small plastic tool box- a fishing tackle box is ideal. As you are a first-aider you will have a good idea what to put in along with those items not in the proprietory kits.
AnswerID: 150801

Reply By: Voxson (Adelaide) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 13:55

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 13:55
The RFDS has a 1st aid kit which is the best...
It has your body divided up into numbers in the kit and also all the drugs and stuff numbered ....
So it works fine as a normal 1st aid kit but if you happen to be at the scene of a remote disaster whether it be your disaster or not and you have a doctor on the other end of your hf radio,,,, it makes it easier for him to offer info on administering first aid....
What a great idea.....
AnswerID: 150804

Follow Up By: Voxson (Adelaide) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:11

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:11
Disregard my answer................. DISREGARD
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FollowupID: 404345

Reply By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:04

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:04
Just go to the local Chemist and ask them to put together a kit, the find your own box to suit. We have two, one of them is flat and fits under the passenger seat, the other is in the camper.

See your local GP for perscription stuff.
AnswerID: 150806

Reply By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:19

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:19
Our local GP is a keen 4WD'er and he and a few mates also Dr's go away together, he reckons that they could carry out major surgery in the middle of the Simpson, but between them they would be flat out changing a tyre.

I guess you can go overboard on a First Aid Kit and not be able to use half of it.
AnswerID: 150809

Reply By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:49

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 14:49
Hi Laura

I've got two kits, one is an equip first aid kit that lives permanently in one of the carpartments in the cruiser, the other is from St John's I think it's called the "out door" kit, I decided to buy a kit already set up, I've had to replace the "band aids" and some of the saline solution which you can get at the chemist...

Spray on "bandaids" are good, stingoes or similar great to have, "wound closures" like butterfly bandaids are great, splinter probes are handy, scissors, imodium [just in case you never know...lol] gastrolite, [esp for kids] I even got some cold/flu lollypops for the kids as well and put them in,

that's all I can think of for now..

cheers

Lyn
AnswerID: 150819

Follow Up By: Kiwi Kia - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 15:51

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 15:51
You'r onto it Lyn,

I recomend two compartments;

1. Plasters, wipes, splinters, stings, headaches etc.
2. Real wounds dressings and tools.

Do not open the second box (bag, whatever) unless you really have to. Keep it clean and dust free with all the tools intact for a real emergency.
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FollowupID: 404358

Follow Up By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 15:58

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 15:58
yep Kiwi, the second kit has never been opened, so therefore I know everything is intact "just in case"

The other has been used several times esp for cuts and grazes, it is divided into compartments so I can easily get my hands on what I need...

Laura, another thing a small can/spray bottle of insect repellant might be a good idea too, last year while we were away my daughter got 2 ticks in her head, having not had to handle this situation before, I consulted my St Johns book [comes with the kit - I have a Cert 2 in first aid but needed to double check] and the recommended procedure was to spray the tick with repellant then wait til it shriveled and pull it out with tweezers, I did this and the tick was removed no probs and no dramas for her either, so since then I've put a small can in the kit so I know I can get hold one easily.

cheers

Lyn
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FollowupID: 404359

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 16:35

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 16:35
St Johns, RFDS and Red Cross kits are all good.

I have found the need to have two kits with me.

The larger (hard case) kit lives in the vehicle and a smaller (cloth bag) kit is more portable for hiking (which I don't do any more) or the boat.
The hard case I actually put together myself using a new "Rubber Maid Fishing Box". It has a clear lidded compartment on top which is ideal for small items such as tweezers, scissors, splinter tool, scalpel, etc. (scalpel?)

Additions like insect repellent, sun block, personal medication, etc. are kept separate from the first aid kits. Too much crap together otherwise.

Now Laura, you have me intrigued. What does one do with chalk tablets???
Bill


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AnswerID: 150846

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 17:38

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 17:38
Don't bother with my question on chalk tablets.

Did a google and discovered this is another name for indigestion tablets or power. Always learning hey!

Yes, I have included Mylanta in my box of goodies.
Bill


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FollowupID: 404377

Follow Up By: Member - laura B (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 20:13

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 20:13
well there you go...hubby told me they were for sick tummies!!! never knew they were the same thing....he thinks they are different....but hey...
Laura
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Reply By: Dodgy Dan (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 16:59

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 16:59
Hi,

There was a really detailed discussion of this last year - see Post 29245 - with some quite detailed contents lists. Maybe that will also be of some help.

Cheers,

Dodgy
AnswerID: 150850

Reply By: Member - Paul P (Bris) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 20:23

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 20:23
G'day

As a First Aider have you had a look here St John.

Good kits cost a little money. I would expect to pay around $250.00 for a good remote area First aid Kit.

Regards

Paul
AnswerID: 150871

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 22:43

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 22:43
I wouldn't touch St Johns kit. Needs too much added to it, and other stuff removed. I'm not knocking them from an ignorant point of view. I make my living patching people up.

See my previous posts on this issue.

I am beginning to wonder why David offers a search function. I can't recall how many times I've answered this exact same question with lengthy posts. Not doing it again tonight.

Dave
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FollowupID: 404460

Follow Up By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2006 at 06:57

Thursday, Jan 26, 2006 at 06:57
I have to disagree,

my St Johns kit is excellent for what it is - a first aid kit, I don't make a living patching people up, but I do spend a great deal of my time patching my son up as he tends to get into all sorts of scrapes, the first aid kit has served me well.

As Laura is a mother with young children she is wanting something that is handy with bits and pieces that she needs to deal with [most likely similar situations] enough gear to cater for the type of situation we're likely [and hopefully won't] encounter out bush, we can't carry everything, but what I have will serve me well in all the situations I can think of.

and..I understand where you're coming from in a professional manner, but, Laura is new here and I think her question is fair enough, she wanted ideas of things that are not standard in First Aid kits, a fair quesition I think.

YMMV

cheers

Lyn
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FollowupID: 404545

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2006 at 09:58

Thursday, Jan 26, 2006 at 09:58
Hi Lyn,

I'm not proposing the ability to do surgery on the side of the track, or for everyone to carry stuff that I carry, as that would be silly.

But the St Johns Outdoor Kit doesn't have enough bandages to properly pressure immobilise a leg with a snake bite, something that I'd be disappointed to learn if I encountered the situation in the Wonnangatta, 4 hours from help with a first aid kit that had professed to cover such eventuallities.

Dave
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FollowupID: 404581

Reply By: Member - Reiner G (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 22:54

Wednesday, Jan 25, 2006 at 22:54
We bought a big kit about 20 Years ago and I think it was over $200 back then.
Put it all in a big fluro colour tool-box . We might spend $50 per year( if that) to keep it full and in date. That is very cheap compare to what we spend on Petrol and maps and gimicks.
We used it twice and were glad we had it each time.

Reiner
AnswerID: 150927

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