Spare wheel removal frame for 4WD

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 11:49
ThreadID: 30596 Views:2343 Replies:10 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
Hi,
Talking to a friend last night and he mentioned that his dad was having trouble getting the spare wheel off the back of the 4WD due to its weight and him being in his 70's. Has anybody developed a "tool or gizmo" that could be used to assist the older or less physically able drivers to remove the spare easily off the back of a vehicle. Obviously the frame needs to be easily portable for stowage!
Thanks,
John
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Omaroo (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 12:41

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 12:41
I'd like one myself! I'm nowhere near 70, but have a chronically-bad back. Lifting a 33 off the rear door is something that can potentially put me out of commission for days if not weeks.
AnswerID: 154059

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:51

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:51
Thanks for commenting. Replies 9 and 10 look pretty good!
John
0
FollowupID: 408224

Reply By: Vince NSW - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 13:23

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 13:23
There was a post about 2 weeks ago about a loader for the spare onto the roof rack. Would you be able to use a like type of doo hickie to lift it to the rear door ?
AnswerID: 154068

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:52

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:52
Thanks for commenting Vince. Replies 9 and 10 look good.
John
0
FollowupID: 408225

Reply By: Johnnotoo - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:02

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:02
Have seen something in my travels (maybe on Telstra outback vehicles) which used a small boat trailer winch mounted on a bracket above the spare wheel. it should not be difficult to fabricate a plate that sits behind the wheeel (maybe using the same stud pattern) and has an arm that rises up and aft with the winch mounted so that the cable runs through a small pulley wheel so as to lift the wheel clear of bumper and rear doors. Should not be too unsightly. It is a wonder that one of the aftermarket 4WD mobs have not come up with something. Maybe they have?

Good Luck

johnotoo
AnswerID: 154076

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:54

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:54
Johnotoo, Sounds reasonable, however the extra weight on the door skin may eventually be a problem. Reply 9 and 10 sound good.
John
0
FollowupID: 408227

Reply By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:06

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:06
Perhaps someone could come up with a modification of a walking frame - dual purpose! :o)

Cheers

Pete

Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 154077

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:55

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:55
Pajman Pete - thanks!
0
FollowupID: 408228

Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:09

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:09
I guess it would help to know what sort of vehicle he has, but I have seen a couple of Patrols with a bracket and small hand winch above the spare on the back door.

I would imagine this would be fairly easy to organise, simply by fabricating a steel plate with 4 holes to match those on the back door that hold the bracket. Onto this plate would be welded a steel bar with a short bracket out at right angles which would hold the hand winch diectly above the spare tyre.

I might even try it myself . Those bloody tyres ARE very heavy to get up off the ground. Once I have one up, I seem to be able to handle them okay.

Good luck

Roachie
AnswerID: 154079

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:57

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:57
Roachie, was going to try your idea, but reply 10 looks like a winner to fabricate and reply 9 a simple process that would be similar.
Thanks for the input,
John
0
FollowupID: 408230

Reply By: Moose - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:29

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 14:29
G'day John
On a Malcolm Douglas special recently he demonstrated a "tool" for easily removing a wheel from the vehicle, but this was for one of the wheels on the ground. It was like a small table with a simple mechanism that wound up the top until it sat under the wheel (after it was jacked up obviously). With the nuts removed the wheel was pulled towards the individual on some sort of sliding mechanism. Looked bloody easy and was specifically designed for those who have back problems, insuifficient strength etc. I know my explanation is not very good but the point is that if the manufacturer made one which could lift up a few inches he may be able to make a higher lift version (or someone else could adapt it to the rear mounted spare). Unfortunately I cannot recall who made it - MD did give it a decent plug. Perhaps someone with a better memory can recall the name. You could even try emailing MD.
Sorry I couldn't be of more use. Cheers from the Moose.
AnswerID: 154085

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:58

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:58
Moose - thanks for taking the time to think about it.
John
0
FollowupID: 408231

Reply By: Blackie - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 15:13

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 15:13
Have a look at Post 30426.
AnswerID: 154089

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:59

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 11:59
Blackie - a great invention but a little big for stowage.
John
0
FollowupID: 408234

Reply By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 19:52

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 19:52
John ,
What about a swing out wheel carrier , that not only hinged around , but hinged out and down .
Then if it had a telelescopic frame it would go right down to the ground .
The tyre could then be taken off and put back on at ground level . You could attach a fairly light weight pully system to the rear of the roof rack to lower it down and pull it back into position .
All you would need to store in the car would be the detacheable pulley and the wheel carrier would be a bit mor bulky .
Is that said in a way that you can picture it ?
Cheers ,
Willie .
AnswerID: 154135

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:01

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:01
Willie - thanks for your concept. I believe we may try reply 10
John
0
FollowupID: 408235

Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 21:37

Thursday, Feb 09, 2006 at 21:37
Just use your long handled shovel and some improvisation. How often do you have to change a wheel afterall. Put the shovel on the rear bumper with handle on ground. Roll tyre up handle and tuen so it is facing the right way. Grab handle and lever up. If the cap is to much then find something in the car to get up to a better height. Also works for getting off the back door and for lifting it on to the axle to replace a flat tyre. You don't have to break your back.

At least I don't have the problem with the underslung Toyota spare on the 80 :-))
AnswerID: 154165

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 00:45

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 00:45
Geez David, What a bloody great idea.

I don't have a back problem, but I'm going to try that tomorrow anyway.
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 408132

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 07:45

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 07:45
That's brilliant.

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 408154

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:03

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:03
David - a good process. I reckon that reply 10 could be fabricated to do a similar job, however this would work well.
John
0
FollowupID: 408239

Reply By: Member - Melissa - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 01:35

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 01:35
John

There was a "gizmo" being demo'd at 4Wd shows a few years back but now that you mention it I don't recall seeing them the last couple of years. However, from what I remember the crux of the "gizmo" was a long handle steel bar about 1.5-2m in length. It had a little hook on the end that fitted into a slot in the spare wheel mounting bracket where the hub would normally be whlst the other end was rested on ground. The spare wheel nuts could then be remove and the wheel pulled forward onto the steel bar which essentially guided it to the ground. To load the wheel, the wheel is placed upright at the back of the 4WD, the bar then passed through the centre hub and hooked onto the mounting bracket at the rear of the 4WD. Then it was simply a matter of using the bar as a lever with the wheel being gently pushed along the bar towards the mount with the aid of gravity as the handlers end of the bar is raised just passed level. As the wheel got closer to the vehicle, the operator simply moves their hands along the bar behind it so that they are in position to ease the wheel onto the studs. Does that make any sense??? I actually had a go myself during one of the demonstrations and it was pretty easy. As I said, I haven't seen these gizmos around lately but I'm sure you could make your own pretty easily. Get an appropriate length of bar, wield a hook on one end and drill a suitable hole in the spare wheel mount and voila!

:o) Melissa
AnswerID: 154223

Follow Up By: Member - John C (WA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:18

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:18
Melissa, This is a good idea. Wil pass it on and no doubt fabricate one.
Thanks, John
0
FollowupID: 408245

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:36

Friday, Feb 10, 2006 at 12:36
Hi John and Melissa,

As a further thought, maybe if you already have a hand winch you might be able to use the handle in a similar fashion. That way there is another multi use item for storage.

Kind regards
0
FollowupID: 408248

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)