should L platers drive 4bys.

Submitted: Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 19:59
ThreadID: 31301 Views:2418 Replies:24 FollowUps:25
This Thread has been Archived
this is not so much a question of weather or not we let our daughter drive our jackaroo while on her L plates because she will be any way but more a tale of an anti 4wdriver.
story goes like this.
our daughter got her L plates yesterday(will have them for 2 yrs) and we decided she can drive the jackaroo for the first 18 months or so because its an auto and theres probly nothing more scarier than getting out on the road and trying to deal with idiots and learning gear ghanges ect.this might not be the case for most but you dont know our daughter lol.
then the plan is in the last 6 months to tewach her in the manual car.
the wife goes to work today and was yacking with the guy there about what we are doing as far as drivng is concerned and then it starte.
something like this.
are you and jim mad letting your 16 yo daughter drive a 4wd while on her learners.
dont you see the news about how unsafe 4wds are how they roll over all the time ect ect.
4 wd drives shouldnt even be allowed on local roads.
there to big there unsafe you cant see out of them there to heavy they roll
you cant control them if something happens STATISTS prove than you more likely to be killed or injured in a 4wd than a car.
the wife says where the hell do you get all this crap from i bet you havnt even been in a 4wd so how can you say that.
he says your right ive never been in one and never will(this is the bit i love)dont you watch tv today tonight ect there always doing a story on some one being killed in a 4wd or a 4wd killing someone.
goes to show that the bad publicity really is working against us isnt it.
ps this is a true story.
cheers
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Rojac - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:06

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:06
No, let her learn to drive in a inexpensive car first and after a period of time when there is some compentancey then progress.
AnswerID: 157906

Follow Up By: nowimnumberone - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:28

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:28
thats our problem
theres no such thing as an inexpensive car.
we could go buy a $200 heap but i wouldnt like my daughter to be in an accident in some old heap of junk
or buy a half decent old car $2000 plus rego plus insurance.
that we will do when our lotto numbers come up.
0
FollowupID: 412244

Follow Up By: Rojac - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:41

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:41
The odds are high on that she'll probably have an accident through inexperience, may not be directly her fault but there may be contributing factors, hopefully you're fully insured and won't mind any potential damage to your vehicle.

Safe driving comes with experience ( hopefully as there are always exceptions)
0
FollowupID: 412249

Follow Up By: Exploder - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:22

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:22
Safe driving comes with experience> there is only one-way to get it too.

Better to have a minor Accident with you in the car, the driver will learn a valuable lesion about how quickly chit can go wrong and hopefully keep that in the memory bank when out and about on P’s , yes your car may have a dent or 2, but better than a written off one or injured son or daughter latter on in my book’s.

My son or daughter when the time comes will learn at first in whatever car I have for the first bit, be that a V8 sports car, 4WD or probably a Hygiene fuelled car by then LOL.
0
FollowupID: 412287

Follow Up By: Exploder - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:28

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:28
See this is why we need to be able to edit after posting

I mean what the F**k is a Hygiene fuelled car, will it powered by Dettol

Hydrogen Fuelled car thankyou very much, Just call me Mr. Butter fingers.
0
FollowupID: 412292

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:39

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:39
Perhaps "hygiene fuelled" is run from some sort of cabin methane collection device ??? 10 beers and 6 meat pies will get you home from the pub?

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 412446

Follow Up By: Member - Duncs - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:38

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:38
At least you would not have to worry about injuries from the accident geting infected.
0
FollowupID: 412584

Reply By: Member - Reiner G (QLD) 4124 - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:17

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:17
I would say that depends very much on the kids atitude. I have two doughters one was a wild one she was driving the laser and the other one was a bit smarter she could drive whatever she wanted to. No she is riding a fireblade for 4 years and never had a problem the other one has wrecked two cars.
There is no general rule to that just use comon sense.
My two cents worth anyway.
cheers
Reiner
AnswerID: 157910

Reply By: michael42 - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:25

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:25
Our daughter is learning on a Pathfinder (because it's an auto), prior to obtaining her licence she will progress to the manual Hilux. It is her preference to learn in a 4wd, she will be able to handle a larger car eg parking etc, rather than a Hyundai provided by the driving school. She has commented that she prefers the height of a 4by. She is becoming quite a good driver actually (even with Dad following and making suggestions over the cb from behind). I have seen some real gooses in small cars doing things that would endanger those around them. Why is it that the little doof-doof cars are the ones doing burnouts, not the 4bys?

Cheers,

Michael
AnswerID: 157912

Follow Up By: nowimnumberone - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:29

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:29
exactly
0
FollowupID: 412246

Reply By: Exploder - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:33

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:33
Personally I couldn’t care less, as long as they are being taught and getting road time in all conditions.

At least learning in a 4WD you will gain more confidents from driving a large car and have more ability from learning how to Park it, maynover it in traffic and in tight car parks and control on the open road.

Then when you jump into a small car everything will be a breeze, She will go from reverse parallel parking a 2-ton 4WD to reverse parallel parking a lancer or something, my thought are you Kid will walk throe her driving assessment no worries if she can confidently handle a 4WD on L plates.

I remember when I was doing my Truck license 2 years ago, would jump out of the Truck and into the Explorer and it felt like driving a Sports car LOL.
AnswerID: 157913

Reply By: Member - Andrew (Bris) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:48

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:48
I lent the Patrol to my 18 year old daughter and her boyfriend a couple of weeks ago. That same afternoon I got the phone call - 'Dad, we've had an accident'.
They were stationary at a set of traffic lights. Another 18 year old driving a small car decided not to stop. Result - Minor damage to the plastic bits on the back of the patrol, other car close to a write-off, other driver badly shaken, my daughter now wanting to trade her commodore for something a little stronger like a Patrol.
AnswerID: 157916

Follow Up By: Rojac - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:53

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:53
As long as the invincibility factor doesn't give a false sense of security.

Patrol stronger than commodore, mack truck stronger than patrol. etc
0
FollowupID: 412254

Reply By: Lone Wolf - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:57

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:57
I learnt in a 4 x 4, did my test in it, everything.

I would much rather her in a 4 x 4, than a V8 Commy or Falcon.

My daughter living in Sydney has just bought a Triton, whew, sigh of relief!

They'll push the limits of any vehicle, you & I did...

Wolfie
AnswerID: 157921

Follow Up By: Rojac - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:06

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:06
Push the limits we may have done but in my case you can only push a EH, HD, Morris Minor etc so far and no where near the cars of today.

They only way some of these would go fast was if you pushed them off a cliff.
0
FollowupID: 412257

Reply By: Peter 2 - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:59

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 20:59
I taught the eldest to drive on a troopy, got his licence on an auto car, the middle one learnt on an turbo auto car and the Humvee, the youngest on a 2 litre auto.
Depends on the person and their attitude and confidence when learning and will vary from person to person.
Also what you as the supervsing driver feels they can handle.
Remember as the supervsing driver you are responsible the L plater is under instruction.
They are all careful drivers but the girls are more careful than the young bloke.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 157922

Reply By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:08

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:08
Hi there nowimnumberone,mate let her go for it, she will be a better driver I think,just check your insurance and green slip insurance to make sure the vehicle and your daughter are both covered in the event of any accident (lets hope that wont be an issue) but thats why there called accidents. I wish my wife learnt on a big car/4wd as she gets in the hilux and reckons that's big,LOL thats why I have no chance of getting an 80 series cruiser. Go for it and I wish her luck in future learning and when she gets her p plates. Might pay to get a couple of lessons from a driving instructor as they do have more of a chance of passing than some one that is tought by mum and dad. true facts, my old man was an instructor and so was I. The examiner will look at it different if she goes to do her licence in a lancer than dads 4by even if she can drive without any faults they will find one. Some of them are very hard especially these days and will get tougher. They are actually talking of making all people getting a licence to be tought by a profesional instructor. Good luck and take care,Want to know what they will pin her for send another post when the time comes and I will tell you. There's more than what's written in the book as per usual. Regards Steve M
AnswerID: 157928

Reply By: Brian Bentley - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:20

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:20
I am 18 and bought my 1994 landcruiser ute when i was 16.
I paid $18 500 cash for it after i had my learners for 4months and got my licence first attempt 2 months after that.
I never drove a vehicle until i got my learners and have not had a dent or caused and accident yet or lost any points.
After driving my ute for 1 1/2 years i hate driving around in a car because i feel more unsafe in a car than a 4WD.
In a 4WD you have greater visibility and can prepare for the unexpected that you see ahead on the road than you would in a car.
Learn the basics in a car then it dosent hurt driving different vehicle to understand different driving techniques.
AnswerID: 157934

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:05

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:05
You paid $18,500 cash when you were 16?
0
FollowupID: 412305

Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 07:25

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 07:25
Well paying paper round??
VKS737 - Mobile 6352 (Selcall 6352)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: Water Tank 55 Litre

0
FollowupID: 412342

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:44

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:44
Ah the young people today. When I was 16 I spent all my money on the more important things in life ... just can't remember what they were just now!
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 412448

Follow Up By: Brian Bentley - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:50

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:50
As a matter of fact i did do 2 paper rounds before i was old enough to work. Quit that after a year then worked at Bunnings for 20 hours a week after school and weekends. Then got an apprenticeship as an first apprentice carpenter while still working at Bunnings once a week till second year.

Now i am only a 3 1/2 year appentice carpenter

( i dont waste money on drugs, just on my 4WD and grog)
0
FollowupID: 412593

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:57

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:57
Bunnings @ about ~$10 an hour
18500 / 10 = 1850 hours...
working 40 hour weeks, thats still ~47 weeks.

Paper rounds must pay well these days! I remember helping a mate do one about 30 years ago we got small change :(
0
FollowupID: 412597

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 07:17

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 07:17
Well done Brian,

We are all just jealous that you got started on 4BY's a lot earlier than most of us!

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 412653

Reply By: cackles - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:33

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 21:33
I learnt to drive in a diesel four wheel drive I think it is just what you get used to.
however due to legalities i did my driving test in zippy little driving school cars, and kept going over the speed limit. It took me long time to get comfortable in other cars and i still prefer to drive turbo diesels
AnswerID: 157938

Reply By: simple - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:05

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:05
my sister learnt to drive in every car in the family.
a manual pulsar, an auto jackaroo, a manual hilux and a manual barina
that makes for a versatile driver and one who understands the differences betwwen the vehicles
AnswerID: 157947

Reply By: Barnesy - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:13

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:13
What i say may be unpopular but its what i think. I hate driving my 4.2 diesel 5 speed GQ around the city and suburbs. It's a big lump in stop-start traffic, pain in the arse to drive. I would rather drive a commodore. Majority of severe and fatal crashes occur on country roads so in the city there is really no point in having a fourby unless you go bush or tow. Once i get on the open road i love my fourby though.

Lucky i live in the country.

Barnesy
AnswerID: 157951

Follow Up By: Exploder - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:47

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:47
I wouldn’t say unpopular, but it’s not cheep keeping 2 fully insured good car’s on the road, I would much rather keep a 4WD in the garage for trip’s and off-road use and drive around in a XR8 the rest of the time.

Currently funds and space don’t permit for that so it’s a trade off between driving around the city in a 4WD and having the ability to go placers that a lot of others can’t, or having a nice tidy Street machine.

I think the XR8 will win out next time thou, I would like to by one and slightly tweak it wile I can still afford to run the bloody thing LOL, like the look of the new Ford line up. My dream would be to keep the 4WD and have a 71 XYGT-HO in the garage for use on the weekend; best Australian car ever built IMO.

0
FollowupID: 412298

Follow Up By: Rojac - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 19:08

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 19:08
Will agree with you there, rather drive my crummydore in the city rather than my 75 series. Drive defensively, you don't need a "large" vehicle to feel secure in.
0
FollowupID: 412529

Reply By: timglobal - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:34

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:34
I'd rate learning in a 4x4. To learn a manual it is arguably the best as the clutch is v strong, the gates easier, etc.

I learnt and passed my test in a Landy. Understanding the size, control and power of such a vehicle wasn't lost on me. Especially when I pulled "careless" friends cars from local ditches.

Being able to learn on an airfield or large area of paddock helps. Get boxes or barrels and practice parallel parking. Learn to judge gaps at speed. Try cadence braking, brake-lock in safety, etc.

Just don't instil they're invincible - a few trips to the ex-army wreckers for spares taught me that even Land-Rovers are very vincible in the hands of anyone, esp. squaddies.

When they get a faster car though, be sure to teach speed skills. Vigilance, anticipation, control. When I got my first "fast" car, I went on an advanced and then (arguably unnecessary) close protection course and hell they show you some tricks in any car.

The advanced course teaches you to a higher level what you should be doing safely normally. The close protection course teaches you how to do everything you "properly" shouldn't, to get out of abnormal situations, safely. But they teach you the onus and responsibility of such knowledge - it isn't a hoon academy and I was with "real" professionals learning their trade. Hadn't J-turned an armoured Rangie (or BMW 7) before, or indeed any 4x4 before. Only needed those skills once in real world, but that was enough. That's a side anecdote as it moreover taught the responsibility of such techniques and the empirical nature of defensive driving that must be drilled.

So to sum up - learn in a 4x4, but don't take it's weight or size as a cover for your skills. And finally, practice emergency techniques off with space, not on public roads - gravel ones included.

Amen.

T
AnswerID: 157956

Reply By: Laura B - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:47

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 22:47
i learnt to drive in dads work ute but also learnt in mums paj. Almost everyone has some sort of accident by the time they are 20 weather its their fault or not.....i did my p's test in the Paj and did fine....im now 24 and have only driven 4wd and will not change ...

Go for it but i remember that the first time i drove a car in the driveway a ute felt huge and it was a manual....start manual...its so essential imho that they learn in one at some stage....

that guy is a richard cranium!! obviousley if Today Tonight said that its raining outside on a 50 degree day he would believe them without checking to see if its true..

BAN STUPID PEDESTRIANS NOT BULLBARS!!!!

good luck......

Laura B
AnswerID: 157963

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:12

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:12
All that proves is that the bloke your wife works with is a moron.
AnswerID: 157972

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 04:15

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 04:15
Her work colleague is probably Harold Scruby!!!
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 412332

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:54

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:54
Hi there truckster, any more news on the nunes up at Lithgow on the 11th of this month in regards to the greenies trying to close any accsess. Have a few blokes lined up ready to go, not sure if it was you or chump_boy that posted it ??? Regards Steve M
0
FollowupID: 412434

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:52

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:52
Steve
Check www.outerlimits4x4.com and the trips section.

0
FollowupID: 412594

Reply By: peterK - Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:16

Wednesday, Mar 01, 2006 at 23:16
After doing one the best I thing I can recoimmend is a Defensive driving Course - My girls will be doing one when they start
I did the basic with Murcotts - its not about race car driving but car control and scanning. also what ever car she ends up driving make sure thats the one she uses in the course.
My regret was I did it in my car with ABS and not the GQ

Pete
AnswerID: 157973

Reply By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 02:14

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 02:14
I started in a Landcruiser and that's what got me hooked on the 4x4 thing, from day one I got used to driving big cars so I think that it can only be a good thing

AnswerID: 157982

Reply By: Member - Sam (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 07:53

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 07:53
I learnt in a manual tarago and an auto falcon station wagon. Did some lessons with an instructor in his manual pulsar. Drove a manual Suzuki Swift for about 1 year before I bought my first vehicle - a 2.8 Manual Hilux. I now own a GU Patrol. Would never go back to a car. As many have already said, learning in a bigger vehicle has its benefits, but also learning on a range of different sizes helps. It allows the driver to learn to adapt to different vehicle conditions. So tell your wife to tell that bloke to pull his head out of his clacker and wake up to reality.
AnswerID: 158005

Reply By: flappa - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 08:51

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 08:51
My daughter has just got her P's. She started learning in the Patrol because it was an auto. Didn't last long. She found it far too hard because it was such a large vehicle.

We ended up purchasing a small vehicle for her to learn in and then drive . . best money spent.

She went from being barely able to drive , to driving pretty well within a few days. The different vehicle was amazing.
AnswerID: 158017

Follow Up By: Barnesy - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 11:23

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 11:23
This is similar to the experiences i have had with girl drivers in the city.

You have to learn how to walk before you can run.

Learn how to drive in a normal car and if she's going well then move up to a big fourby if she wants to.
0
FollowupID: 412407

Reply By: Member - MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 09:26

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 09:26
When mine goes for hers in a few years time she will LEARN to drive at a driving school. Then she will PRACTICE in whatever vehicles we have at the time.

As others have said a lot depends on the individual's temprament. Some will be fine in anything while others you wouldn't trust in a tank....

Anyone who watches ACA has my condolences... (they're already brain dead!)
AnswerID: 158030

Follow Up By: roblin - Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 18:31

Wednesday, Mar 08, 2006 at 18:31
john,
you have hit the nail on the head. Let the professionals teach our kids to drive and we can assist them by letting them practice in our vehicles. My son has just reached the magic age.
He isn't allowed to drive any of our cars until he has done at least 5 lessons (which we will pay for)

I am not a driving instructor, nor is my wife or his mother. The kids need proper eductaion not our interpretations of the law and our years of bad habits.

Cheers, Rob
0
FollowupID: 413933

Reply By: chump_boy - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:21

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:21
Howdy all.

I learnt in an LJ Torana, and the day I got my P plates I picked up an ex-army series 2 landrover.

I rekon I leant more after about 2 weeks in the landie than I did in 12 months in the Torana. There was no radio, no air con, and solid steel all the way round. I could see above all the traffic, and the speed was governed to 80km/h - sweet for an 18 year old.

I only ever had one incident in the landie - some idiot was parked behind me, and swung out into traffic. She went straight under the back of the car, stuffed her bonnet, side panel, lights, the works. She offered to pay any damages, and was really nice, so I showed her the small scratch on the quarter inch steel jerry can holder.......

When my kids are learning, I will definitely try to get something similar for them. No radio, no air con, nothing to distract them from their driving is pretty important. The 80km/h limit is also excellent, as it ties in nicely with the max speed for P Platers. The soft top and no noise protection also lets them hear whats going on round them, so they can hear that motor bike scooting up the inside, or hear that car in the blind spot.

Off the road, I was a bloody idiot. I used to drive down hills so steep that I had to lean the bull bar against trees to stop rolling down, only to watch the bull bar bend back under the weight of the car. Or slide down muddy hills sideways, or drive through real deep water (old land rovers do'nt float....but sierras do).

All this taught me a lot about driving as well, and let me get a feel for the vehicle in different circumstances away from other traffic. I leant quickly how to break properly on steep muddy hills, a skill which transfered nicely to extreme braking on the road. The manual transmission skills were learnt quickly as well.

All up, I think learning in a 4WD is great, especially if it is old and slow, and you actually take it off road and put yourself in extreme situations. You learn a lot about yourself, your vehicle, and what to do in different circumstances.

Enough of my ramblings now. Time for a prozac....

Cheers,

Chump
AnswerID: 158064

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen M (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:53

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:53
Hi there chump_boy, any more news on the nunes up at Lithgow on the 11th of this month in regards to the greenies trying to close any accsess. Have a few blokes lined up ready to go, not sure if it was you or truckter that posted it. Regards Steve M
0
FollowupID: 412433

Follow Up By: chump_boy - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:55

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 12:55
I think it was Truckster - I said I would go though.

I've got at least 2 4bies lined up at the moment. We'll probably be meeting at Sunny Corner fairly early, and come along that track to be at Capertee by 11.

I'm kinda waiting for information though.

Cheers,

Chump
0
FollowupID: 412435

Reply By: Glenn (VIC) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:58

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 13:58
Just wait until I bring the work commodore up next time, she can drive that to her hearts content.

Cheers

Glenn
AnswerID: 158088

Reply By: roofscooter2 - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 14:20

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 14:20
we as a family drove from qld. to Kangaroo Valley ,thats where i got out of the drivers seat & told my L plate 17yr old to drive down the winding road & she did ,teh second hair pin bend school bus coming other way ( narrow road as well) wife was s#@$&*ing herself but not the daughter she handled it like she had been driving for years.that was in short wheel base troopy frp.bob.
AnswerID: 158091

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:52

Thursday, Mar 02, 2006 at 22:52
Did you go thru Berry?? You would have to have stopped at the Berry Donut Van - that is the only reason for heading down that way!
0
FollowupID: 412595

Reply By: roofscooter2 - Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:17

Friday, Mar 03, 2006 at 14:17
truckster, we ended up at Berry to get to Shoalhaven Headsbut we did not stop to get any of those berry nice dognuts lol. Bob.
AnswerID: 158351

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)