what happen to the friendly wave

Submitted: Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 20:54
ThreadID: 33546 Views:2211 Replies:29 FollowUps:22
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hi, just wondering what's happened to that friendly wave that people towing vans etc use to give each other in passing. it seems to be disappearing it once was nearly every one gave that wave and now your lucky to get a wave from 1 van out of 6, we always wave and it gets disheartening after a while. it also helps give the kids something to do (yell at dad quick wave here comes another van, as if we can't see it). is it a sign of the times or are we just in the wrong place at the wrong time? how many of you fellow campers do wave?
see you down the road (we will be the ones waving!!)
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 20:59

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 20:59
Same thing with the new breed of truckies , and if your in trouble on the side of the road they ask on the cb AFTER they passed ...are ya right mate,
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Follow Up By: Exploder - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:37

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:37
...Reply “No mate I thought I would just pop the bonnet and grab the tool bag because everything was running sweetly, Over”
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Reply By: fnq triton - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:02

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:02
i'm a waver and agree with you completely, on our last trip the missus and i were having competions on who could get more waves and picking the cars that would wave. we didn't get as many as we thought we would. I think people are too busy concentrating on the one thing rather than noticing whats going on around them
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Reply By: hoyks - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:11

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:11
Waving died off a few years back, around the same time as the start of road rage.

When I was growing up near Taree, everyone would wave as they passed on the roads, now it is a rarity. You still get the occasional wave out west, so maybe there is still hope.

I wave to oncoming traffic still when on back roads and to other fourbie owners wether I’m in town or on the open road. Get the occasional wave back and a lot of ‘who the hell was that’ type glances. The only occasionally get completely ignored by those with the must get there tunnel vision that, in my opinion, defeats half the purpose of a road trip.
I also wave at the people that let me in in traffic, or change lanes so I can get out of a side road. Un-common courtesy really.

Mine is a one man crusade to get waving at passing travellers back into the Australian psyche. And it’s not a full-on 'look at me over here wave', just a casual two fingers lifted off the wheel type of wave.
AnswerID: 170751

Reply By: George_M - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:13

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:13
I think you're right, in that "the wave" seems to be dying out. On the other hand, my experience is that the subtle raising of a couple of fingers off the steering wheel is alive and well.
Come any closer and I'll rip your throat out!

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Reply By: Muddies Doe(Trippn) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:15

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:15
Hi Gonebush

To me you generally know when you have hit the country form the waves you get as you drive along.
But yes, I have noticed they are less common now.
Maybe people are more looking ahead keeping focussed on the road than to see who is waving to them as they drive past and some do at quite fast speeds too?
Just my thoughts.

Cya
:)
AnswerID: 170757

Follow Up By: Laura B - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:38

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:38
The only road I know of locally that you are going to get a wave guareenteed is Hockeys Lane linking Cambewarra and North Nowra - that only because youve gotta give way to the "non-locals" who push their way through the shicanes!!

Laura B
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Reply By: Muddy doe (SA) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:18

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:18
All too busy looking out for government cars parked on the roadside with cameras mounted on them!
AnswerID: 170758

Follow Up By: Trevor R (QLD) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:36

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:36
That's my excuse.....haha.
In all honesty still a big partaker in the wave to other vanners and even heaps of all vehicles out west regardless of van or no van.

See you out there, Trevor.
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Reply By: Exploder - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:33

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:33
I wave when I go north, if going south I might wave depending on where I am going.

AnswerID: 170760

Follow Up By: Laura B - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:36

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:36
please wave to a white 80 in Nowra when ever you pass through....there are a few of us - I cannt even single us out by saying we are on gas cos there is a few of them....we have an arb roofrack and blue spotties cdma aerial and small uhf aerial on bonnet....dark tinted windows.....

i know that us southerners arent the happiest - is that because we dont live in Hervery Bay like the new research shows???LOL!!!

we are an up tight bunch down this neck of the woods - please bring some happiness on your next visit!LOL!!

Laura B
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Follow Up By: Exploder - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 15:34

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 15:34
I am In WA, Perth to be exact< But will give a wave in the off chance that I am over in that direction.
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Reply By: Muzzgit (WA) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:35

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:35
I too give the cockie's wave when in the country, but rarely get one back. The people we regularly travel with think I'm wierd, but I grew up in country WA so it's kinda natural.

Some of the country towns in the wheatbelt have signs with some kooky little saying about "give us a wave" or something like that, I can't remember exactly.

I find most country folk are armed and ready for the cockies wave.
Most city people just don't give a ......
AnswerID: 170762

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:30

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:30
Yes. Lake Grace promotes themselves as a "wave" shire. On our recent holiday we waved at all other campers, caravanners, etc. Most waved too. When interstate we waved at anyone with WA plates - a few waved back. We wave at anyone smiling or waving or just looking like they should get a friendly wave (that's most of you).

What about stopping to help? We stop and offer help any time we a car vehicle stopped with bonnet up, flat tyre, or similar. Most times they thank us but have things under control. As a young driver, i never had to change a tyre on the roadside - some prince charming always pulled up and changed it for me before i could think about what to do (different on the farm when i had to do it one my own). In later years i found it was only the country cars that stopped and offered help. Recently when we were stranded on the side of the Stuart Highway with a broken tow hitch, not one vehicle stopped. I hasten to add the the people i went to for help were absolutely wonderful.
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Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:24

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:24
Hi Motherhen,

I agree with the stopping to help philosophy but unfortunately there are some undesirables that take advantage of this. When we travel in a group all of us are happy to pull over and help and we have done this on several occassions but feel less inclined when tavelling alone. A quick assesment of the situation is what I do and if it looks safe I'll pull over. Some nutters have now made this a risky proposition.

Last year we were nearing the end of the Tanami and there was a lady with kids parked on the side of the road (she was indigenous - but that doen't matter) we pulled over. She had run out of fuel and whilst we had none to spare we were able to call a relative to come out and assist. The strange thing was that she wasn't expecting any help from us and the relative was very appreciative that we made the call - so you just can never tell.

Kind regards
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 12:13

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 12:13
Hi Beatit

Last year we stopped for a car with a bonnet up, whitest person out on the road hailing us down, dark little kids colour disguised in the shadows under the trees with Mum. Ran out of petrol just a few kms from home he said. Jim kindly offered them some of our generator jerry can - they took the lot. We had to refill at the next servo at Nullabor prices. He still will stop. This year went passed a group with a flat tyre - need a hand mate? no thanks mate. He had help on the way. I felt more secure camping just off the road near there having made the friendly offer. I still would rather risk stopping to help than leave someone stranded. Sad that some people might take advantage of the old Aussie look after each another attitude.
Motherhen

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Follow Up By: gonebush SA - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:18

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:18
we alway stop to see if help is needed when a car is droken down and it's amazing how long some of the people we come across have been waiting for some one to stop. just before christmas on a stinking hot day we were heading home along south road near Mc larren vale (quite a busy road) we saw a car with an old couple in it so we hung a u turn to see if they needed help. the poor old couple had been sitting there for 2 hours hoping some one would stop as they had no mobile phone to use, the man was going to walk into the town (about 4klms) to phone the RAA but didn't want to leave his wife who was in quite poor health and very hot, we got the mobile and rang for help and waited until it arrived as it was something that couldn't be fixed on the road side. just the thanks we got and knowing we could help was great.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:29

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:29
So glad you stopped, gonebush; those poor people. Perhaps with all the good stories outweighing the bad, we should all continue to take that minimal risk and stop and offer to help anyone. In most cases it costs us only a few seconds of time, as people generally say they are able to do the repair, or have already sent for help. Even if it made us late, helping a fellow traveller would be well worth it. With the aging population of caravanners and campers out there, do stop again - it may be people like the couple gonebush helped. Even of the scale of it, the 20 litres of ULP we 'gave away' is infinitesimal on the whole fuel bill for the trip.
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Follow Up By: gonebush SA - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 17:36

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 17:36
oh we definitely will stop again and another thing to remember that one day it might be one of us or our family member stuck on the roadside.
keep on waving/ helping
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Reply By: Member - Omaroo (NSW) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:38

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:38
I get waves all the time from other Land Rover (Series & Defender) drivers nearly every time I pass one going in the other direction. I really like this aspect of driving Land Rovers.

I also find that we always get waves on dirt roads in and around where my folks-in-law are - Lightning Ridge. People up that way always seem to at least raise a finger in passing to say g'day.
AnswerID: 170764

Follow Up By: tim the enchanter - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 10:59

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 10:59
i used to get around in a kombi for a while and always, without exception, you would get a headlight flash or a wave when seeing another kombi.. the best part of owning a kombi i thought, the unsaid comeraderie.

also when ive been out on the eyre highway probably 8 times out of ten you would get a wave.. its still alive and well out there i reckon.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mary W (VIC) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 21:24

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 21:24
I agree that most defender drivers give one a hearty wave.Series people too,Rangy's sometimes but Discos seldom
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Follow Up By: Member - Omaroo (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 22:12

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 22:12
Nice rig there Mary! :)

If I see you going north to the Snowies one day I'll be sure to wave!

Chris
LROC Sydney
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Reply By: Member - Andrew W (SA) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:41

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:41
I'm a fingers off the wheel waver - particularly on dirt tracks or in the country.

I find the further north or west you get the more waving you get.

Like the B-double at the front of five that I had to pass on the Western Highway on Tuesday night who told me to "wind up your cruiser now mate" when he saw some clear road ahead. Quite entertaining really given my low power low tech donk, but reinforces my opinion that truckies on the road are generally helpful souls.

Once you get off the beaten track, I find most will wave back. In the High Country last week. Certainly in Central Australia - on the Boggy Hole track week before last the local government nurse on his rounds stopped and chatted for a good 20 minutes.

Keeping on waving on.
Andrew.
AnswerID: 170768

Reply By: ZUKSCOOTERX90(QLD-MEMBER) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:45

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:45
We drive in a Winnebago & often get waved at my wife waves anything i think,but is a bit hard to do the Aussie Wave or the Mexican Wave whilst you are driving anywhere.
AnswerID: 170771

Reply By: Laura B - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:47

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:47
I wave to bikes,4wders,caravaners - you name it - if they have aerials ill try and call them up - usually no go -

i think so many people get too caught up in there own world . I lived ina small village near where i live now and it was great - everyone knew everyone else and even if you didnt you'd walk passed and say G'day.....but where i live now its the total opposite - your a derro if you say G'day...the in-thing" to do is put your head down and keep walking!

Laura B
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Follow Up By: Des Lexic - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:02

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:02
G'day Laura, Bugger, now I'm a derro. LOL
I wave to other 4bys but not many wave back like they used too.
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Reply By: Old Scalyback & denny - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:53

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 21:53
goodday gonebush
missus and i always wave once out of the city normally to other vanners as most wave back there are times when i dont wave mainly when concentrating on something else missus has formulted the middle finger wave if she doesnt get a wave back when driving
we get a few waves from other drivers normally well out of town

steve
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Reply By: Footloose - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:32

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:32
We used to know how remote we were by the number of fingers waved at us. One was just outta town etc. When people actually waved a hand we were really remote.
I often whinged that not enough people waved , until my wife told me that people were waving and I hadn't waved back. Oopsies !
To me, waving is a sign of friendliness. Assuming that it isnt the middle finger raised :)
Its a bit like pulling into a camping spot. Everyone is sus of you until the next morning. "See, I told ya they weren't axe murderers dahl ." Then they become friendly.
One thing I've noticed is that more people used to say gooday when I used have the wife and kids along. "He can't be a bad guy, he's got kids."
Now it's "Oh he's on his own. Vewwwy sus." Of course if I were a female I wouldnt have that problem ! But I'm not about to dress up as one just to get people to say gooday !! (as a young friend said after a drink, "maaan you'd make one mega fuglee chick !" :))
One of the great thing about remote travel is that most people still seem to pull over and have a yarn. "how's the track ahead?". Of course if the track is wide and fast and well travelled they simply zoom past in the middle of the road, throwing stones as they go. Ba$%ards !!
Waving is one way of showing that you're friendly.
Please encourage it among yourselves and others.

AnswerID: 170789

Reply By: V8Diesel - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:41

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:41
I know I'm somehere I want to be when more waves get returned than not. I view this as a form of litmus test. I feel a bit disappointed when I drive at night for this reason.

When poeple stop giving a nod or a lifting a couple of fingers off the wheel in the sticks, and city motorists no longer flash their lights to warn others of a speed trap or wave to someone who lets them in...........well that's when Australia is knackered. Does seem to be heading that way.

I think we are living in a state of fear these days. You watch, somebody will post a reply soon about the dangers of waving.
AnswerID: 170793

Reply By: Shaker - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:41

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 22:41
Funny you should post this, as going by your name you are from SA.
We are from Victoria & find that when we are in SA almost every other 4x4 waves to us, which we in turn acknowledge.
When we cross the border back into Victoria, it stops completely.
AnswerID: 170795

Reply By: Member - Royce- Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:17

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:17
The raised finger works a treat. I tend to drive with my finger raised almost all the time.... not the big one!

It sort of looks like I'm waving .... but then again maybe not.

That way anyone who feels like waving does and those who don't...... well I wasn't waving anyway!

Years ago with the kids we went a bit silly after a while and the whole family would give full body crazy flailing of arms waves to every car that approached. Didn't care a #$%^& whether anyone waved back.

My experience after travelling around 65,000 ks last year all over? Lots of waves. My rig looks like I could be a bit of a slightly grey nomad... maybe it depends on what you drive?

AnswerID: 170814

Reply By: Turbo - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:44

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:44
hi all,im from the bottom end of the yorke peninsula sa. everybody waves here,also when the trucks are carting grain the local kids at scool stand out front & wave, so the guys give a couple of tugs on the air horns & every ones happy. its the way it should be.
AnswerID: 170821

Follow Up By: Turbo - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:47

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 00:47
sorry,spelling
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Follow Up By: gonebush SA - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 09:46

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 09:46
we just returned from a holiday at the bottom end of yorke peninsular and yes a lot of the locals waved but when we were coming home there seemed to be a great number of the 'grey nomads' heading down the peninsular and we were lucky to get 2 waves, these are the people that we thought would give the wave.
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Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:33

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 08:33
G'day Turbo,

We're from Kadina and I have to travel down your way (Edithburgh, Yorketown and Coobowie) for work (NAB) every couple of months or so. I also call on a bloke between Yorketown and Stansbury to buy my oil and filter suppliers (AMSOIL). If that is the area where you live, keep an eye out for the Patrol with EO stickers front, back and both sides, twin spare wheel carriers and a friendly wave to just about everybody I see.

Cheers mate

Roachie
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Follow Up By: gonebush SA - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 17:40

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 17:40
no Roachie, we don't live on Yorkes we just spent some time at Point Turton over the holidays, but i will keep an eye out for you when we are down that way.
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Follow Up By: Turbo - Sunday, May 07, 2006 at 01:04

Sunday, May 07, 2006 at 01:04
Hi Roachie, we live just out of Corny Point. white nissan twin cab has sticker on back window ( gravelle) can't miss it .we also wave to everyone im sure we will run into each other one day & havachat. cheers Dave..
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Reply By: Sparkiepete - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 07:00

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 07:00
I disagree. Whenever I drive out west of Bundaberg it isn't hard to get the one finger wave(not one finger salute either ;-).
It is mostly on the back roads where you get your friendly wave. On the main highway it is all...............Gotta get there and I don't have time. Which is why I don't worry about it on the main roads so much.
Just my two cents worth.
Regards
Sparkiepete
AnswerID: 170836

Reply By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 08:01

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 08:01
We wave to everybody when we are out of Adelaide but we get some strange looks though.

That was what I liked about the Territory when we were up there a few years ago - Everyone waved.

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

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AnswerID: 170846

Reply By: Diesel Power - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 08:48

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 08:48
The one time we always give and get a return wave is when we are out in the boat. Im still a road waver but seem to find that road rage has killed the wave to a fairly large extent, except from all the exploroz forumites who will seem to wave or babble to anyone, which I reckon is great.

Cheers and beers (and a wave)
Scott
AnswerID: 170852

Reply By: Member - Dedalus (SA) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 09:36

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 09:36
Here in Kangaroo Island the "locals" waves at all the time .... but usually white small clean cars dont ..... (tourists) . When I'm driving back to Adelaide (on the Flerieu Peninsula nobody) wave back anymore! I also keep my CB radio on on the island but I will turn it off near the big smoker ... too many idiots using a very bad language for my 7,5 months old daughter ....

Luca
AnswerID: 170867

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:34

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:34
It was considered not politically correct, so was made illegal.... lol
AnswerID: 170896

Reply By: ian - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:04

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:04
Whats with all this waving stuff?
Give me a break.
On a track stop and have a chat; in remote areas or if somenone moves over for you yes, acknowledge their courtesy: but on the bloody highway....leave me alone!
My wife disagrees and waves to you all. I wish you a safe and happy trip, but just get on with it and leave me alone.
Ian
AnswerID: 170914

Reply By: Michael B - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:29

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:29
Interesting topic, having lived in country towns for a long time I believe it to be more of an acknowledgement than a full blooded 'wave' out of the city limits.

Even driving around town (not the big smoke) most locals will lift a finger or two, tourists not so often.

On a trip anywhere I tend to raise a finger, nicely of course, to just about everyone and most times it is recipricated. I use my lights for truckies when no UHF and it is not often that you are ignored.

In the city or in traffic only to acknowledge that someone has done the right thing and that, I believe is appreciated.

May be showing my age a bit, but does anyone remember the plastic hands attached to a small spring that was suction cupped to the windscreen? Was in a constant wave motion....could bring them back.

But this day and age they would have to be made of a biodegradable material that would not obscure vision and placed outside the car, somewhere that it would not harm the enviroment or pedestrians:)

Cheers
Michael B (SA)
AnswerID: 170920

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 15:47

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 15:47
Hey Michael,

Probably get booked for obstructing your vision! For that matter with all the fuss of concentrating on driving and not being distracted probably means that waving will also be outlawed soon.

Kind regards and waving through my computer (wish someone had an emoticon for this?)
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Follow Up By: gonebush SA - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:09

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:09
my hubby keeps joking about getting one of those big hands (like they use to use for indicators) except bigger and making it stick out the side of the car if people don't wave so that you know they at least seen it, don't woory he only jokes about it we wont ever do it.
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Reply By: Sam from Weipa Auto Electrics - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:43

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 13:43
In weipa everyone waves it can get annoying after a while but I still enjoy the friendly wave
AnswerID: 170923

Reply By: Members-Neil & Margie-Cairns - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:52

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 18:52
Evening all ,,
as a Cairns local truckie i wave to all truckies big and small , the opposition and all , it don't matter , when off in the Paj its the same , give a friendly g'day , it won't hurt you , might even make someones day ,, if we are on bush track , we'll stop and have a bit of a chat ( if they stop that is ) ,, guess it is a sign of the times and i don't really like it all that much , it costs nothing and those who don't might just need a hand down the road a bit ..

all the best ,, Neil ..

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Reply By: Steve - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:45

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 20:45
I like to wave with the best of em. Think it depends on where you are though. Going thru Coffs Harbour on the Pac Hwy it gets a bit tiresome waving to your 116th fellow vanner in the space of 10 ks. Once you feel you're away from it all though it's nice to connect.
AnswerID: 171026

Reply By: Troopy Travellers (NSW) - Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 07:36

Saturday, May 06, 2006 at 07:36
We wave and find similar to another post that people on dirt roads wave back.

Troopys seem to wave and acknowledge each other both in the city and the bush.

Its just a show of a friendly attitude I feel.

Carolyn
AnswerID: 171089

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