Truckies impatience a disturbing trend?

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 13:33
ThreadID: 34697 Views:2997 Replies:19 FollowUps:39
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Hi All

I was towing a trailer of Class 3 flammable to a minesite yesterday in my Defender doing about 90kph, with a semi right up my klacker, waiting for the opportunity to pass. After cresting a rise, he started overtaking on the downhill run. A little ute appeared around the bend heading towards us about 150 metres away. The truck trailer was beside me, and I had to brake to let him get past. Without a doubt, if I hadn't there would have been a collision...only a cutting for the ute to run into. The truckie would have had 2 choices...the ute or me.

Unfortunately, this isn't a one off experience (although my closest yet). I seem to see it regularly...sometimes they might time it badly, othertimes they rely on the smaller vehicle slowing or getting off the road. I deal with lots of truckies in business, so I know the sort of constraints they have put on them.

Does anyone else think this is becoming a trend, or have I just experienced a flukey run of this?

Regards
Brid
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Reply By: Member - Sam (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 13:49

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 13:49
Its not a flukey run. I see it all too often.

But there is also the other side of the argument. You also get the responsible truckies who do the right thing having idiots in small vehicles cut in front of them.

But unrealistic travel times placed on these truckies is not helping. It is manifesting this dangerous culture.
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Follow Up By: Member - Blue (VIC) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:00

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:00
I don't buy the unrealistic travel times argument... The industry is screaming for drivers at the moment... If ya boss is pushing too hard, go next door... I do casual work for Jets Transport Express, currently also looking for drivers, 11hrs for Sydney express is ample. In my "day" job I deal with drivers from several of the big transport companies and none of them are being asked to make unrealistic times...
Unfortunately there are many cowboys in the industry who make it hard for the rest of us. The guy's I do come across who are bitching about travel times are the heroes who sit in a diner for a couple of hours talking sh1t and then load themselves up with chemicals and falsify their log books to get the job done... IMO, no-one to blame but themselves.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:41

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:41
Blue,

Thanks for your forthright and honest perception of the sort of "cause" that can influence inappropriate behaviour.

A very good analogy mate.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:24

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:24
every one has the right to overtake someone who is doing under the speed limit the law say's you have to give way &let in anyone who is overtaking! There is a lot of companys pushing tight scedualls But I admit there are a few cowboys still around especialy based out of Ql Ld
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 18:04

Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 18:04
Dave[nsw] would love to know where in any road rule book from any state in Australia it states that you have the right to overtake ,and /or that the vehicle being overtaken has to give way ,, the law is YOU can only overtake when safe to do so.,,,people seem to forget that the "speed limit " is a maximum speed allowed by law ,not a requirement to travel at said speed.
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Sunday, Jun 11, 2006 at 19:14

Sunday, Jun 11, 2006 at 19:14
NSW Rule book says"If someone is overtaking you on a single lane road, keep left & leave them room to pass & Move back in.Don't increase your speed" .Know one sayed anything about speeding."travelling at 90 kl anyone has the right to overtake at 100kl in a 100kl zone!!
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Reply By: Member - Ed. C.- Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 13:58

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 13:58
Well, I guess it depends on one's perceptions (and attitude) about such things....

You have to remember that these blokes are _at work_, and their first priority is getting the job done...

If a truck approaches me from behind, then it's obvious that he's going faster than I am at that time, and as soon as he's close enough I take the first opportunity to let him pass & go about his business... As a former truck driver myself, I think I have a pretty good understanding of their mind-set, and I have never had an issue with them.. (just get outa their way & let 'em go;-)))....

Anyone who has not done so should seek an opportunity to spend a day (or a week) as a passenger with a truckie, and you will come away with a whole new perspective on what they have to put up with on a daily basis...
Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

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Follow Up By: Brid from Cost Effective Maintenance - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:09

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:09
Naturally!
I take the opportunity to let them pass ASAP. They're better in front than behind.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:19

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:19
Ed,

Sorry mate, but that is B u l l s h i t. It is that attitude by Truck drivers that give the industry a bad name.

"these blokes are _at work_, and their first priority is getting the job done"

These blokes also have an obligation to ensure that there actions are carried out in a safe matter, to ensure the safety of themselves and other road users.
They DO NOT have any more rights that anyone else.

The problem is, many of them are dosed to the eyeballs with uppers, or downers, to keep themselves on the road and on some (unrealistic) schedule.

Like most others, I will show courtesy to any other road user approaching me from behind, if I am not able to keep up with the speed limit. But if any aggression is demonstrated by them, I will broadcast their actions on channel 40, to alert others to a d i c k h e a d being on the road.

Bill


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Follow Up By: Member Rough it - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:53

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:53
Hi Sand Man

Where do you get these figures that backs up what you say is true, that many of them drivers are on uppers and downers.

Is it from 60 Minutes on chanel "9" .....Or did you just hear this or read this from someone
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:07

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:07
Sand Man,

I won't get into the uppers/downers argument as I would'nt have a clue as to what they're on or not on. However, I agree fully with your statement that they have no more rights on the road than anyone else. It's a pity they don't/won't understand that.

The small minority of d i c k h e a d truck drivers is growing at an alarming rate every day. If they can't handle the 'heat' in their chosen profession then get the hell out of it and stop killing themselves and others.

Yes I've had my fair share of 'opportunities' with wankers in large vehicles who think they own the road. I'm just glad that they're still in the minority, for how long though ??????
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:40

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:40
According to the crach investigator who was running our driver training this week who has investigated many accidents, drug use is very common. They use speed to stay awake and as it wears off, the drivers fall asleep and crash. While on speed they actually don't have an accident very often. When they are still high they smoke dope to bring themselfs down so they can sleep. He quoted something like 1 in 40 random drug tests detects some sort of drug.

Leroy
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Follow Up By: robak (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 09:25

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 09:25
Most people / cars that are on the road between 9-5 are "at work" and need to get the job done.

R.
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:34

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:34
Leroy.
Those drug test showed about 3 in 400 the same tests where done one car drivers in Vic and came up at 8 in 400 so check facts before doing a chanel 9 type bull$$t storey!!!
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 20:35

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 20:35
Dave,

You're a tosser. You didn't read who I said quoted the figures. Not chanel 9....or did you mean channel 9?

Leroy
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Reply By: Notso - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:05

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:05
Yep, I agree they are at work and deserve special consideration.

They also have a responsibility to act reasonably whilst on the road and even I find it a bit daunting with a 40 tonne or so truck "Up my Clacker" when I'm looking for a spot where I can pull over and let him past, if they would just hang back a bit so it gives us a bit more room to slow down and pull over into a layby.

Then of course you have the idiot like I saw today driving with with his hand on the Air Horn (Dunno what else he had his hand on) 2 or three metres behind a poor old bloke in a little hyundai. Now how can the poor old beggar concentrate on driving and finding a spot to pull over with that in his rear vision mirror
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:59

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:59
Deserve special consideration? You've got to be kidding. They have to obey the road rules like everyone else on the road and should be treated the same as any other road user.

Leroy
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Follow Up By: Old Scalyback & denny - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:04

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:04
the special consieration most deserve is from vicroads or the police as i find a greater number of them running red arrows and lights and when you havea close look they are not even in total control of there trucks because they are talking on the phone and trying to turn corners at the same time
i see this all the time as i do between 100 & 300 ks per day around melbourne and suburbs and sometimes it does become scary
so maybe istead of spending a day with a truckie park on an intersection with a camera
i do find most interstaters are reasonably tolerant when travelling and i would normally give them a call on ch 40 and ask them to let me know when they are coming around and i will hold steady

steve
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Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:19

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:19
With apologies to kath and Kim writers............

I have only TWO words to say Brid........"Use the radio"........hahaha

I must admit that it is not very often I have a semi come up behind me.....usually the other way round. However, on those rare occasions, I am quick to jump on the UHF, just to let him know I'm aware of his presence and that I will give him a fair go (ie: by slowing down a little and/or pulling over a bit). 9 times out of 10 he'll say "thanks mate, no worries, I'll just hang back til a chance comes up".........or words to that effect.

Like the others have said, these blokes have a job to do (and it sounds like you were on the job too Brid; what with that dangerous cargo you were hauling).

Yes, there some cowboys still around, by in my experience, 99% of truckies are decent blokes (with a wife and kids waiting for them at home; praying silently that "dad" will get home in one piece).........and most of 'em would give you the shirt off their back.

I'd have to say I reckon you've had a rough trot....not the norm by any means.

Just my observations.

Cheers

Roachie
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 18:51

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 18:51
Spot on Roachie mate,
Thats the best way to go about it. I do the same thing myself. Let them know that I know they are there. They do apreciate it and have less stress knowing that when they overtake me, I know its going to happen. I have been in the industry most of my working life, I know what its like sitting behind a vehicle doing 90 on a 100 road, especially if a hill is approaching. It can be the difference of dropping down a few gears to make it up or cruising up without all the extra work.

Ange.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:03

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:03
Ange,

Here is another scenario.

You are sitting on 90 kph towing a trailer, so you are doing 10 kph under the speed limit. Along comes a "B" Double and passes you because he can do 100 kph. Two minutes later his speed bleeds off to 60 kph (or less) as he climbs a steep hill, thus forcing you to drop to a far slower speed than what you could otherwise have done.
Now in this scenario, the truck diver new he was approaching that hill, but did he give other road users consideration? NO!

In SA and I assume in most other States, passing lanes are gradually being introduced on hillclimbs to limit this kind of frustrating driving situation and it is definitely improving the situation. Slow vehicles use the left lane, faster vehicles the right lane. This must have saved a considerable number of accidents and "road rage" situations, albeit at considerable cost.

The fact is, all drivers in all sorts of vehicles need to use some smarts when travelling our highways. This is another reason, I enjoy getting off the bitumen and on the dirt.

I WILL do everything to assist a driver of a Road Train in maintaining his speed. This is not because his Rig is bigger than mine (although it certainly is) but because I recognise the difficulty in that driver having to work his way up through the gears and ranges, each time he is forced to slow. So you give them the courtesy of as clear a run as you can. The end result is they are happy and so are you and you usually get an "air horn acknowledgement" of their appreciation, if not via UHF.
Bill


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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 13:30

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 13:30
Point taken Sand Man.

I'm back in my corner now :-)
waiting for the bell to ring once more.
Ange
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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:24

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 14:24
A bit of respect cuts both ways. Last year on our big trip we had plenty of occasions to get out of the way and happily did so BUT we had one occasion where we were stuck behind a couple of road trains (empty cattle wagons) - they were doing around 70/80 KPH so we asked politely if we could go past (the road was wide enough for the vehicles to stay on the bitumen). All was well with the first guy he held it steady while the 4 vehicles passed but he second guy was asleep at the wheel. We radiod him and he said OK - long straight road - we started to moove and got halfway up the last wagon when he started to slowly move to the right - WTF - ran over the shoulder while braking hard. Bluddy spooky when he came over the radio with something like were you there already.

Have plenty of respect for big rigs as my BIL drives one, but that was a seriously dangerous event, real white nuckle stuff.

Kind regards
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Reply By: TerraFirma - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:06

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:06
It would seem Truckies are working to a tight schedule and these schedules seem to be getting tighter and the traffic seems to be getting worse. Thats a recipe for disaster and we can all say "No Excuse" but the harsh reality is thats theirs and some of them are becoming very dangerous. There's not a day gone past that I don't have one sitting right up my arse, and surely if I braked all of a sudden I would be hammered up the bum. They are fast becoming missiles of destruction, just look at all the recent incidents of trucks colliding through an exisiting accident scene. One took out a brand new Police Car near Benalla recently, the cop car had only done 29 km's and it was absolutely destroyed. There was another in Brisbane last week also.
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Follow Up By: Brid from Cost Effective Maintenance - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:26

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 15:26
Yes, we need to take a lot of care on the road these days, but I believe that most truckies are safer drivers than the average motorist, it's just that the risks are much higher when a large vehicle in involved in an accident.

Last Thursday, I was returning from Central Qld, and came across a road train on its side 20km north of Dingo. It was hauling ammonium nitrate to the mines. The last container broke free of the trailer and rolled. It was more the shape of a pillow! But still with its contents intact. The cops and firies were already there. I realized it was ammoniumn nitrate only when I was adjacent to the truck. The firies had their hose out prepared for any diesel leaks.

I gotta tell you, I had a cold shiver through me at that stage. I would have made an enormous hole in the ground if it went up!
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Follow Up By: terrano tripper - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 16:10

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 16:10
Another one at Bargo NSW last week. Truck wrote of two police cars, killed the truck driver of the original accident, the two coppers managed to get out of the way.
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Follow Up By: Member Rough it - Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 18:23

Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 18:23
Hi did you see what truck it was and the age of the driver, and did you know that in all truck accidents 87% are caused by ( should i say it ) CAR DRIVERSSSSSSS.............................................

we would all be stuffed with out Truckies....
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Follow Up By: Brid from Cost Effective Maintenance - Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 08:51

Tuesday, Jun 13, 2006 at 08:51
No Rough it
Don't know the age of the truck driver. It was a bright orange prime mover though...didn't have time to note the company details..not a company colour I see a lot of up there. Prime mover was still intact and upright...not so the last trailer.

I wasn't aware of the 87%, but it doesn't surprise me. There's good and bad, patient and impatient, curteous, and discurteous car and truck drivers on the road. The whole point is that we've got to be aware of these things and manage them while we're on the road.

Regards

Brid
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Reply By: Leroy - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:12

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:12
Truck drivers......I don't have much time for them at all. I supose it's a case of a few bad apples but that's been enough for me to give them very little respect and that's only because of their size.

I had a Concord Park B-Double driver get upset with me recently. I was on the Hume passing him on a bend going up hill and he started swerving back and forth while I was beside him because he came up to a slow vehicle and wanted to pass. What he expected me to do I don't really know. Maybe he wanted me to hit the brakes so he could overtake?? Anyway I continued and he obviously had to slow down. Later down the road he flew past me and pulled in in front of me getting so close I swerved away from him going onto the shoulder. Without this evasive action he may of hi me. He sprayed me with stones etc. I have more sense than to take on a @ickhead in a b double and especially with my family on board. Now he shouldn't of been able to catch me. I was doing 110km/h and he should be no more than 100kph and he was miles behind when I left him. I caught up to him again and he swerved into the right lane and wouldn't let me pass. He drove like this until Benalla. Professional drivers....yeh right.

Leroy
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Follow Up By: Moser - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 18:51

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 18:51
Like the truck who was doing 60 k's in the 110k zone I was a bout the 20th car behind him and I couldnt see the end of teh line behind me, I ask him politly on the uhf if he could let some cars go past him, I got the Get F*%#&Ked response. So from now on any truck behind me can just wait ,

Moser
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Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:21

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:21
That makes a lot of sense.

I suppose if I pi$$ off a truckie on the highway or a trailbike rider on my next fourbie trip, on that basis you are happy for him to treat you & everyone else here with disrespect because I made a bad name for fourbie drivers.

Dave
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Reply By: Member Rough it - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:38

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 16:38
Hi Leroy

Did you report him..???
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:29

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:29
I called ahead to Benealla police and they were doing calcs to work out if they could catch him or how long they had to wait for him etc while I was on the phone. They were asking where I was etc. to work this out. I don't know if they pulled him up somewhere as I never heard back.
But I did send an email to Concord Park as soon as I got home. They replied a couple of days later saying it was a contract driver and they won't be using him anymore. I'll never know.

Leroy
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Reply By: Crackles - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:04

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:04
As a part time truck driver I see this very situation happen all the time particularly with the new 500+ horsepower trucks speed limited to 100KPH. It’s so easy to catch slow cars now even on hills but with only 5 to 10 KPH additional speed left to pass with allot of time is spent on the wrong side of the road to get around, particularly when the cars get caught up in the slip stream & go faster.
The answer is easy though. It doesn’t matter what you are driving, whether it be a truck, 4x4 or car towing a van, if someone catches you from behind they are obviously travelling quicker so keep to the left to give them a good view of the road ahead & back off a little when a gap in the traffic allows them to pass. A bit of courtesy goes a long way.
Cheers Craig……..
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Follow Up By: Member Rough it - Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:04

Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:04
Hi Crackels....
I agree with you 500 % take you................................
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Follow Up By: Member Rough it - Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:06

Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:06
Thank you even................................................
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Reply By: Footloose - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:16

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 19:16
I know that some of you drive trucks, and are going to be upset at this post but I can't pretend to be happy with the behaviour of many drivers.

Truck driver cowboys aren't a new thing. After a few incidents similar to the one Leroy recounts, for the last 20 years I have refused to travel the Hume or "Seseme Street" as it's known.
I decided long ago that the 1% of drivers who are a danger to everyone on the road give the other 99% gentlemen of the road a very bad name indeed.

More recently I travelled from Sydney to the Gold Coast on a Wednesday night. I was tired, and happy to pull over for anyone faster than me. (get in left overtaking lane and try and get back in when a convoy of trucks is determined to fly by...I actually stopped several times as the slow lane ran out !...this truck is speed limited to 100k/h...yeah right !) I think I saw around 2 cars and literally thousands of trucks on that road that night. All of the ones going north passed me in convoys; around blind corners and over the lines. They flew ! This would have happened hundreds of times.
I didn't know that there were that many trucks in all of Australia !
And I didn't see 1 police vehicle.
And the scary bit is that there were even more trucks parked on the side of the road than were on the road.

Last year the trucks between Mt Isa and Cloncurry were a bit of a worry. They overtook anywhere and everywhere. Sure they know the road, but they dont know whats over the brow of a hill etc.

I've met some courteous , considerate and safe truck drivers. Unfortunately they are well and truly the minority.
I am now very sus of large trucks. The attitude of many of the drivers is bloody dangerous to other road users. In some cases it borders on the criminal.
I will have no hesitation whatsoever in reporting any future incident.
The sooner we get a national rail freight system, the better !
AnswerID: 177273

Follow Up By: Member - Bware (Tweed Valley) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:26

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:26
I've got to agree with you Footloose; if it is a case of 'a few bad apples' why does EVERYBODY have numerous accounts of close calls with trucks?
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Reply By: SteveL - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:45

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 20:45
If we had a thread for truck drivers on close calls with cars,I think we would 20 for every day we ever drove.-SteveL
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Follow Up By: Member - Bware (Tweed Valley) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:02

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:02
I appreciate your point but it doesn't take into account all the variables; truck drivers and all professional drivers spend more time on the road therefore see more incidents of dangerous driving. Someone who spends one hour a day driving to work and back will theoretically see 10 times less dangerous driving than someone who spends 10 hours a day driving.
For the average driver going on holidays or visiting family etc who travels along a major highway for a few hours, we need to look at the ratio between trucks and passenger vehicles on the road. ie between point A and point B you encounter 50 trucks and 500 cars. Now as an example, lets say we see 2 incidents of trucks driving dangerously, that means we need to see 20 incidents of other cars driving dangerously for the ratio to mean that there isn't a higher number of dangerous truck drivers. My original figures are probably generous; for every truck on the highway there is alot more than 10 cars.
And all things aren't equal; a truck doing 100 is potentially alot more damaging than anything else on the road yet they speed, tail-gate (how on earth do they think they will pull up in time if the car in front has to hit the brakes?), overtake in risky situations......
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Follow Up By: Member Rough it - Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:18

Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 21:18
Hi Bware...
AS a truck driver I travelled from Brisbane to home today and seven times I was following cars and one 4wd towing a camper trailer, I stayed about 30 to 40 metres behind them, as the over taking lanes where coming up i moved closer to them and put the blinker on then moved to the right lane to overtake them and what did they do ????? yes put there foot down so i could not overtake them. So please tell me WHAT ARE WE TO DO ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????>>.,.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bware (Tweed Valley) - Sunday, Jun 11, 2006 at 01:01

Sunday, Jun 11, 2006 at 01:01
Hi Rough It,
I may have come across a little anti truckies but that is not the case. I was pointing out what the few do (even though I said it may be more than a few!). Also psychologically people are more likely to remember a close call with a truck than anything else because it's a tad more frightening. I can understand the frustration you must experience in your job, but part of that frustration is directly related to it being your job, as it is for all professional drivers regardless of size of vehicle. Working in hospitality I also get a gut-ful of people that don't understand my point of view. I used to drive a worn out 2H Troopie and can understand little things that frustrate like coming to a hill and the car in front sits on 60 then puts their foot down and accelerate up the hill leaving you with no run-up and having to keep dropping gears;-).
Your example of the overtaking lane though, doesn't only happen to truckies; there's plenty of posts here about inconsiderate driving, and that affects all of us. Although I concede that all those crappy examples like people that pull out from a side street in front of you, and your example of the overtaking lane, are more frustrating for truck drivers. But the post is about dangerous driving; the sort of stuff which if results in an accident there are charges like 'culpable driving', 'reckless endangerment', 'manslaughter'......and people die.
I don't know what you are to do; but frustration should not lead to dangerous driving. This is in no way a personal assault on you, just my 2 bob's worth. Hope we can discuss other topics over a campfire some time :-)
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Reply By: Steve - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:54

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 21:54
Some of us don't have radios in cars other than our 4bies either. I'm not always driving my 4by - and I'm working too. You don't have to be a truckie to be on the road and working to deadlines/appointments.

A few months back I took my little fella on a bus ride, just for the novelty of it. The driver was constantly yacking to a passenger sitting right at his side. He arrives at a "T" junction and blatantly pulls out in front of a car who was already on the road and had the right of way. He just sniggered to his "mate" and said "I've got a timetable to keep to". I couldn't believe the arrogance. How the f%*^ did he know the car he pulled out on didn't have far more urgent business than him?
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Reply By: Doggy Tease - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:10

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:10
k then,i'll bite at this apple. lol.
i will say up front that i am a professional truck operator. i operate a heavy vehicle for a living, day in, day out, throughout the Perth metro area. Contrary to the inuendo, and misconceptions that are rife in this thread, there is a helluva lot more to my job than just driving around all day, scaring the begeezus outa everyone in there little buzz box's, and their little 4x4's as well, whilst doped up to the eyeballs.
Every day i am amazed at the stupid, moronic, suicidal, idiots that are on our roads, blatantly disregarding the fact that we even exist.
A few facts for all of you.
1) A loaded semi can weigh up to 42.5 TON, your 4x4/car weigh's between 1-3 TON...(except Roachie :) )
2) A truck does not handle like a car, it is big, heavy and cumbersome on the road.
3)A truck has more brakes than a car, but the weight of a truck simply means that it will take alot longer to stop.
4)It takes alot longer to get a loaded truck up to the speed limit that a car.
5)Every time a truck uses the brakes, it takes time and fuel to get back to the speed limit.
6)The training, book work, logbooks, weighbridges, even urine tests, time away from family, work over holiday periods, would make alot of you think twice before entering this profession.
If i took the attitude that i read in this thread, of bacically stuff the trucks, and applied it to me. It would be stuff the cars, and guess who would be the one still breathing.
Think for a second before you pull out in front of a truck. Think for a second that he passed you on the flat for a reason, he knows the road. He knows there is a hill comming up, and momentum will get him to the top at a reasonable pace, and once on the other side, he will be gone, whilst you still plod along at 90. Think for a second when you go to the shop to buy bread and milk.
Over the last few years, the road has gotten to be a dangerous place to be, no matter what you drive, and the complete disregard a large portion of the population have for trucks astounds me.
We are big,heavy and slow to get moving, but we have a job to do. You may want to get home to the missus and kid's, but so do we. So let us do our job, and give us, what you expect for yourself. RESPECT on the road.
At the end of the day, we are the most regulated industry in the country, with some of the highest stress levels of any profession, yet we still have to be at the depot on time-every time.
Stop and think before you bad mouth a truckie, and maybe instead, you will thank him for doing his job.

rick.
time to get of my soapbox, before i really get fired up.
AnswerID: 177316

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:50

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:50
Onya Rick....keep the shiny side up mate............ ;-)))

Cheers

Roachie
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Follow Up By: ImEasy - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 10:02

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 10:02
And Vice Versa!
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Follow Up By: Member - Matt- Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 10:15

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 10:15
Well said Rick
cheers matt
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Follow Up By: SteveL - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 13:21

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 13:21
Yeah,well said Rick.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 00:31

Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 00:31
Doggy Tease

Your got too be kidding?

"with some of the highest stress levels of any profession"

are you an owner driver?

"logbooks" in WA?

Every time a truck uses the brakes, it takes time and fuel to get back to the speed limit.

What and a car doesn't?

Get real we all use the roads of Australia and you don't have to be a Truck Driver to be a professional

Richard
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Follow Up By: Doggy Tease - Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 21:43

Friday, Jun 09, 2006 at 21:43
Richard.

Yep....i am an owner driver.

Stress?
Yep.....try it for yourself sometime,,,for more than a few hours,,,,do it every day of the week, and saturdays, for a few years.

Logbooks?
Yep....Accreditation mate, a wonderfull thing the state government brought in a few years ago.

Fuel consumption?
I get 2kpl at best, what do you get in your buzz box?

Brakes?
Damn right....it costs roughly $3000 to do a brake reline on a prime-mover with one trailer. What does it cost to do your buzz box? Idiots that pull out in front of me and dawdle up the road cost ME money.

Professional?
Yep.... damn right i am. i can guarantee that i would rather put my rig off the road,than go over the top of some idiot that has pulled out in front of me, or taken my braking space at a set of lights. WOULD YOU?

And just to even things up a bit. Do you know what i drive to and from work every day? lol...a iddy biddy Dihatsu Charade. AND WANT TO KNOW SOMETHING ELSE?

It is invariably the 4x4 that tries to push me faster up the road, or fills my rearview mirror with roo-bar.

So back of Richard, we carry this country....literally.
And we do a pretty bloody good job at it.

rick.

A.K.A. Richard. my real name.

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FollowupID: 433875

Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 14:29

Saturday, Jun 10, 2006 at 14:29
Yep....i am an owner driver.

Stress?
Yep.....try it for yourself sometime,,,for more than a few hours,,,,do it every day of the week, and saturdays, for a few years.

Logbooks?
Yep....Accreditation mate, a wonderfull thing the state government brought in a few years ago.

Fuel consumption?
I get 2kpl at best, what do you get in your buzz box?

Brakes?
Damn right....it costs roughly $3000 to do a brake reline on a prime-mover with one trailer. What does it cost to do your buzz box? Idiots that pull out in front of me and dawdle up the road cost ME money.

Professional?
Yep.... damn right i am. i can guarantee that i would rather put my rig off the road,than go over the top of some idiot that has pulled out in front of me, or taken my braking space at a set of lights. WOULD YOU?

And just to even things up a bit. Do you know what i drive to and from work every day? lol...a iddy biddy Dihatsu Charade. AND WANT TO KNOW SOMETHING ELSE?

It is invariably the 4x4 that tries to push me faster up the road, or fills my rearview mirror with roo-bar.

So back of Richard, we carry this country....literally.
And we do a pretty bloody good job at it.

rick.

A.K.A. Richard. my real name.

_________________________________

Yer makes sence now

I see where your coming from

Your a truck driver!!!!

Richard (That's my name)
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FollowupID: 433950

Reply By: Joe King - Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:25

Wednesday, Jun 07, 2006 at 22:25
this is not a go at you Brid
I believe that what ever vehicle you are driving, towing what ever you need to tow can not do 100kph you should not get a more powerful vehicle, give way to the vehicles that can at the first opportunity or stay off the road........
The vehicles going along the Lynd, flinders & bruce highways at the moment is rediculous, most are sitting on 80, thats 20kph slower than the speed limit, from charters towers to cairns takes roughly 5 hours sitting on 100, travelling at 20kms less than 100k's limit for 500k's adds about an hour to your trip...
in a perfect world no matter what the limit is, people would drive at the same speed & everything would flow...
AnswerID: 177325

Reply By: Member - Bradley- Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 02:18

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 02:18
Dunno Brid, i have grown up in the country right near the hume highway in vic, now the fwy ( right near where that rig just cleaned up the cop car). I have always had a healthy respect for any heavy vehicle and mostly never have any dramas. Yeah i've been put onto the grass passing a semi when he pulled across to pass another car, wether he saw me or i was in his blind spot i'll never know. just the other week i was coming out of melb on the calder and came up behind a b doub, got the "feeling" something wasnt right and held back, sure enough he starts swerving back and forth across both lanes, so i get on the horn and flash the highs to wake him up, got the big thanks mate out the window as i went past, scared him more than me i reckon.

But i'm more than happy to work in with them on the road, eg if in the right hand lane getting ready to pass, and they are coming up on a slower car or truck, i'll simply hang back and give em a flash to tell them its cool to come out without them having to drop any momentum, sure helps them and geez costs me a few seconds in reality, same as when they are passing you , as soon as the trailer gets past your front give em a quick flash to let them know they are clear to pull in, you will get the old left/right/left on the indicators to thank you once they are in.

If you know their limits and can "speak the language" everyone can have a good trip. One thing i do know is that for their hours and conditions, i'm glad its not me behing the wheel.

I know plenty of professional drivers and i would say that when it comes to knowing the limits and dynamics of their vehicle, they beat 99% of car drivers hands down, i certainly know who i feel safer around.

Finally yes there are cowboys, always have been, always will be, but just think for a second how many imbescilles you see every day driving cars.

Just for a laugh, saw a 18-19y/o girl today trying to intimidate an elderly gent in his hyundai excell by tailgating him flat out, what was she driving - a holden barina !! Battle of the titans that one LOL...
AnswerID: 177360

Reply By: markeaust - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 15:54

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 15:54
Like just about everything, it has to do with attitude. It doesn't matter whether you drive a Hyundai Exel, 4X4, B-Double or an ambulance....the driver must simply have the right attitude for the task.

Some do and drive well....some don't and drive poorly. Seems to me it will always be this way. Those who drive poorly will eventually reap what they sow...it's life.

Mark
AnswerID: 177482

Reply By: Barnesy - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 17:50

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 17:50
Surely a long nose interstater wouldn't be able to see the brake lights of the car in front if they're tailgating them ready to pass?

Even if they could see the brake lights they wouldn't stop quicker than the car, end result is obvious.

If i'm going 100 then how the bloody hell would a truck that's speed limited to 100 catch up to me?

Barnesy

AnswerID: 177495

Follow Up By: Member - Bware (Tweed Valley) - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:22

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 18:22
Barnsey, couldn't agree more but facts don't seem to be that important in these sort of discussions. You know, the ones about endangering human lives as opposed to say fridge brands.....
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Reply By: PradoBoy - Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 21:06

Thursday, Jun 08, 2006 at 21:06
Unfortunately in these days of diminishing margins, rising fuel costs and ever tighter deadlines I think we are all witnessing this type of behaviour more often on our roads.

I'm not siding with the truckies. But I do drive long miles and can understand what they go through.

The best solution I have found - UHF (if the truckies are willing to talk). Often it is possible to get them on the blower and talk them through getting past at a safe spot. They are often happier to wait a little bit if they know you are trying to do the right thing and share the road with them.

Course - that being said there are bad apples amongst the truckies too. Some of them (I emphasise some as in a small percentage) just don't give a toss. Most of the interstate and long distance truckies are darn good drivers though and just want to have a safe trip like most of us.
AnswerID: 177529

Reply By: Off-track - Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 at 01:04

Sunday, Jun 18, 2006 at 01:04
There are way too many people who drive cars and even 4wd's that have absolutely not one iota of an idea on how to drive with and around trucks on the road. Some in this thread have exhibited the same attitudes.

What amazes me most is that we as 4wdrivers often experience similar attitudes from car drivers - not allowing to overtake, overtaking just to get in front of a bigger vehicle, unaware of the limitations of a 4wd, etc etc - and then go on to post drivel about how truck drivers are the enemy of other road users.

There certainly are cowboy drivers, drug users, speeders, red light runners out there...in all types of vehicles. Of course the end effect of a truck accident is much worse because of its greater mass, but many city car drivers (largely mislead by Scruby) use this same argument in trying to ban or at least restrict the use of "killer" 4wd's on the road. I have mates that openly admit they speed up to pass 4wd's and trucks just so they can get in front and get a better view.

Truck drivers should not be treated any differently as any other road user in regards to road rules and general courtesy but they should be treated with a different respect. If not just for your wellbeing then certainly because of their size, mass and performance, and for the long hours they are on the road which can make anyone's tolerance for idiots quite short. Also it is a good idea to keep out of their way just in case you are next to the cowboy driver.

They spend most of their lives behind the wheel with stresses that most normal people would want to be payed a lot more for. Deadlines (versus switching off the speed limiter and taking pills), long hours, separation from family, isolation, logbooks, managing maintenance and budget (owner drivers), operating a bulky vehicle through city streets etc.

Many do exceed the speed limit but I bet everyone has. This does not of course make it right but those with a sense of righteousness should step down from their tower of ivory on this subject. Many take drugs - but these are stimulants, not drugs that diminish the minds' ability to perform. Again this certainly does not make it right or legal to take them and they are dangerous as they mask tiredness of the mind.

There are wankers that operate trucks, but so too there are wankers that drive every sort of vehicle on the road. Start pidgeon holing all truckies and you may as well do the same to all 4wdrivers - pretty soon you will isolate yourself from everyone because everyone is a wanker and out to kill you on the road. Just because you have had one or a few bad experiences with truckies doesnt mean they are any better or worse than anyone else. As someone else stated you tend to notice a truck driver doing the wrong thing because of his size - they stand out.

If a truck is about to pass let them know on the radio that you will let them by and back off the go-fast pedal to make the operation as safe as possible for the both of you. Give a flash of your lights when he is past so that he spends the least time in the suicide lane - particularly if the truck is a B-double or road train. If you intend to pass him let him know your intentions and he will throw you a right blinker when it is safe to do so - he can see a lot further than you can. If on a narrow strip of tar slow down, pull over and give him the road - you will save yourself some stonechip touchups and prevent him from rolling on a soft and sloping shoulder.

Give them room to move and you will quickly be rewarded with a blinker or a thankyou on the radio. You may even strike up a conversation and find that he/she too is not unlike you and just wants to get to point B with the minimum of hassle. You might even make a friend on an otherwise boring stretch of road.

AnswerID: 179024

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