I need help with exhaust jacks.

Submitted: Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 15:00
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I am attempting a Simpson crossing in my 80 series diesel at the end of July. I would like to copmliment my recovery gear with an exhaust jack. Could members please advise the pros and cons good and bad and any relevent info. Thanks in advance.
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Reply By: Footloose - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 15:09

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 15:09
My experience only, others will know different. You really need two people to use them. They are dirty after use. They will lift the vehicle, but are easy to puncture if not careful, and correct placement is essential as the vehicle can slip off etc. DON'T get under the vehicle supported only by such a device.
I'd rather use a proper jack with a plate. That way I dont have to lift it so high as the suspension doesnt hang.
If you're thinking bogged...and are on your own...use the shovel. Sand and shovels go together like travellers and Maccas breakfasts.
Having said that I do carry an air jack but I use my normal jack for tyres.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:07

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:07
I have a spare tube to connect up an exhaust jack F'loosie. Mine went k-a-a-b-o-o-m in a big way the second time it was used in anger. Neither time it was used would I say it assisted anything like a highlift and another vehicle.

I think friend Lucy would say it aged him when he was next to it going off and him nearly underneath digging sand.

Maccas breakfasts???? Not something I would like to comment on as I didn't like the overcooked egg. I steer clear of them now as I do exhaust jacks.
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:14

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:14
John, oh great ! Now I have to worry about it exploding. Now THAT should be good for the heart ! Lucy has my sympathy.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 20:14

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 20:14
We nearly had to pass our sympathy to Deidre, Mrs. Lucy. She would have been less than 40 metres away too, quite a shock!

You better take your heart pills before you use it, just to keep stable.
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:42

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:42
I obviously get people mixed up easily:) Now you've bleep tered another illusion, Lucy is a BLOKE ! Sorry Lucy...I used to go out with a Lucy years ago, Juicy Lucy...but that's another story........and she definately wasn't a bloke....or so her mum told me :))
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:05

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:05
Actually Lucy is a truck, but Robbo adopted her name. I don't know your friend Lucy.
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:11

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:11
I knew you'd be up, waiting for the big game no doubt.
Lucy is a truck ? Hmm...now that's serious stuff.
As for my friend, I would hope that you don't know her. In fact I'm rather glad that I don't still know her.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:22

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:22
I thought you would have been challenging for the 1200th place today mate.

Guess your wife pleased you don't know her now too. Tennis is on here in the family room, but I guess I should go shower and be ready for the big game
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:29

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:29
I seriously thought about it, but as I'm off on Sat morning , I really have too much to do to be mucking around. Oh hang on, thats exactly what I'm doing. Tennis ? Oh yes, someone is retiring (note my extensive knowledge of that game).
As for Lucy, well it was a short relationship. She was short and we werent related.
No my wife doesnt get jealous. Kinda reminds me of what I saw on the Tv the other day. Someone asked a lady what she'd do if he had an affair. "At his age ? I'd give him a gold star for having the energy ! "
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 07:48

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 07:48
Tennis, LOL 35 minutes played because the courts were wet. We gave ourdselves a long service award and didn't go to the Olympics in Sydney, so we went to Barcelona where the bullfight crowds reside for a Davis Cup. See the award below

Seems Lucy relationhip may have been better if you had been related, even though short?

Ah, the energy of staying power awards. 35 year award to both of us mid this month.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 11:24

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 11:24
"You really need two people to use them"

I've used mine dozens of times, always by myself without a drama. It is handy if you have an idle up control or similar to help keep the rev's up while doing it yourself, can take a while to inflate at a low idle.

Dunno how you guys managed to pop it, I'm rough as guts with mine!

I always take the big thick rubber floor mats out of the car and use those as protectors rather than the bleep ant ones that come with it though, maybe that's the trick?
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 12:19

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 12:19
Jeff, perhaps you have a superior brand of bag ?
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Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 12:58

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 12:58
I've just got the bushranger one, bout 7 years old now.
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Reply By: Robin - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 15:31

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 15:31
Just returned from a week in North Simpson and our group took an exhaust jack as a last minute addition because of room as a passenger dropped out.

Can be difficult trying to decide what to take sometimes , and it was last on our list below chains.

A diesel Gu with aftermarket 3in exhaust had it break in half just at back of muffler on rough tracks in Hay river.

The over 1 meter long section of pipe required huge lift combined with wheel removal and lot of twisting and even then a small hole had to be dug to extract it.

Exhaust Jack did the trick and saved a lot of work - and I agree they can be scary without backup, however it was a lot more stable than a hi-lift in our situation

Robin Miller

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Reply By: richopesto - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 16:40

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 16:40
Hi Chris,

exhaust jack takes up stuff all room, if you can slip it behind a seat or whatever, take one. but they do require care to use, slow and easy does it. Having said that, a shovel is usually the go. 'specially in sand.
Suffice to say, if you havent got one now, don't go out of your way to get one. Its just another method in the 301 ways to get your car unstuck. ;-)

cheers
richopesto
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Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:07

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:07
Just be aware that some "experts" say they shouldn't be used with a turbo-equipped vehicle due to back pressure issues causing possible buggar-up of turbo.

Other than that, the times I've seen them demo'd in driver-training situations, they've worked well........eventually. Often the vehicle will start to 'fall off' the jack and it needs to be repositioned and re-aligned. Other times, it hasn't been possible to place it where you'd like to due to protrusions under the truck (which would have likely caused a puncture).
Preferrable to have a couple of bits of old carpet to safe-guard the bag etc.
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:10

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:10
I guess Bill, they are easy on a clutch. Hope you get yours fixed quickly and you go to Warraweena for the National. I would steer clear of contradicting your "experts" as I would not possibly know....
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Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 18:02

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 18:02
Didn't I see an "exhaust jack" the other week that could be pumped from either the exhaust or an air compressor?
Might be an alternative if the turbo theory proves to be true.

Geoff.
Geoff,
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Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 11:31

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 11:31
I used to use mine on the Intercooled Turbo Diesel rocky and feroza all the time and never had a problem... I mean I used to use it on gravel, bitchumen, sand etc etc. The Rocky was Tare 2.1 Tonne, so not a light vehicle Havn't had to use it in years though, never used it on the surf as the clearance of the surf is pretty awsome and she's only ever been bogged 5 or 6 times in 3 years, all of which were snatched out easily. So yeah I don't know about all this back pressure hype, I reckon it's might be BS. The rocky never missed a beat.
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Reply By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:29

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:29
The trick is to use them woth 3' square carpet pieces top and bottom. Not only does this protect them against puncture and heat problems, but the rough texture of the carpet tends to grip the bags and the surface they are resting on more securely.

Obviously keep them away from your catalytic converter and also try to use them under flat expanses of metal (floorpan). They can safely lift the entire side of a vehicle when used under the floor, so there is no need to use them under a corner of a vehicle where they are more likely to be holed or caught on sharp objects (bolts/brackets/etc).
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Follow Up By: GaryInOz (Vic) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:31

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 17:31
PS. do not under any circumstances use them with a poly tarp as protection as it is too slippery.
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Reply By: Member - Fourplayfull - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 18:02

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 18:02
I bought one a few years ago for a "first solo" SD crossing - bellied out on top of a steep dune on the Rig rd - no forward or backward movement so shovelled clear with long handled shovel - easy .
Then on a later mission bogged rh wheels to the side step in gooey black mud in the Tothills . I tried doing the breast stroke with carpet & bag under my 80 but no matter where it was placed it would slip over sideways - as the man said the axles remain too low .
Ever noticed that the demos are performed on an unbogged vehicle ???? . They certainly lift OK but control is a worry . When bogged in the SD on level soft sand let your tyres down to 8-10psi, clear all wheels , place car mats or whatever directly in the path of the rear axle and move off as gently as possible . As soon as you gain speed accelerate .
Good luck
John
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 20:18

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 20:18
Agree with you John, the vehicle would prefer to be pushed sideways. Low pressures in the tyres the best corrective action.
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Reply By: Keith_A (Qld) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 21:15

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 21:15
Chris - they are the anti-christ incarnate. If you have ultimate patience and tolerance; are after a sainthood - and are ready for beatification, then go ahead and buy one. Thay will destroy any chance you have.
Why not drive pins through your tongue or pierce parts of your body that really shouldn't be pearced. That would be more productive than trying to use one of these.
You think I am overstating the case?
They WILL drive the vehicle in any of the 360deg other than the one you need. And why not - you barely have a 1 in 360 chance of the things going where you want them to. In fact much less, because the target is at an angle to begin with, and the ground is NEVER level at the site.

I've taken my medication now and settled down a bit.
The experts say the material has a memory (the bastard stuff).
They say if you take it out before you want to use it, blow it up (and I have some suggestions on how to do that), then deflate it vertically before carefully repacking, it will remember your kindness and not kill you next time you try to use it.
Perhaps if you take cources in how to use them, they may only be evil incarnate.
I refuse to waste perfectly good stanely knife blades on the thing - so it remains hidden in my rear draw.
...............................Keith
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Follow Up By: Chaz - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:20

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:20
Excellent Keith!!

I tell you what Chris...................Kym and I will stay in front of you so that we can pull you out of any holes with our Patrols.

Chaz
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Reply By: Member - Geordie C (WA) - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:49

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 22:49
Wow this one has opened up a can of worms or is that a bag of gas.

Roachie,
I am interested to know more about the reason for possible turbo damage?
"Just be aware that some "experts" say they shouldn't be used with a turbo-equipped vehicle due to back pressure issues causing possible buggar-up of turbo. "

I have a 2.7 turbo diesel Terrano which has an ERG (exhaust gas recirculation) valve like most newer turbo diesels. When the vehicle is at idle, under deceleration or the auto gearbox is in 'Park', the ERG valve is fully or partly open.

The problem with the exhaust jack connected to the pipe for recovery is that the vehicle has to be in Park (for safety) this opens the valve, the increased back pressure forces too much exhaust gas into the inlet manifold and stalls the motor.
I tried for ages to work out what was causing this until I disconnected the vacuum pipe to the ERG and the jack works fine.

I assume this could also be the case for any new TD motor.

Keith,
I tend to agree with the 360 degree rule (not quite sure about the anti-Christ bit, I think that is a Mud-Mauler hand winch). My exhaust jack worked fine the few times I have been stuck on flat sand, the other times I have been stuck on a slope and the long handle shovel is my best friend (blisters are not so good though).

G

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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:26

Monday, Jun 26, 2006 at 23:26
Having a chuckle here Geordie about that EGR valve. I would have thought your motors computer would notice it. Good to have a non'puter motor at times ;-)
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: Member - Geordie C (WA) - Thursday, Jun 29, 2006 at 22:44

Thursday, Jun 29, 2006 at 22:44
Yes John,
my Terrano is old enough to not have an engine management computer although the gearbox is electrically controlled, the motor and fuel pump are mostly manual.
I “fixed” the gasket of the EGR valve with a flat bit of aluminium and the motor has never run so well. No smoke at idle or under acceleration and the exhaust jack actually works without stalling the motor.

However, it makes me wonder about the reliability and usability of the even more computer reliant hi-tech diesels that are around today. I want my old totally manual, vinyl floor, diesel clunker MQ Patrol back.

Regards
Geordie
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Friday, Jun 30, 2006 at 07:56

Friday, Jun 30, 2006 at 07:56
Ahh, Geordie, you could of course continue with the old-style modern diesel in a 4.2TDI GU and I guess even get it vinyl floored if you tried. A screw in the control tube of the EGR valve could do the same as your bit of aluminium possibly. Not that I would know.........

Have a good one mate
Cheers,
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John

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Reply By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 10:55

Tuesday, Jun 27, 2006 at 10:55
I have used mine about 5 times and I can only say good things about it. I have never had to use it by myself so my mate can make sure it's going up at the correct angle and not move sideways. They are very dangerous and unstable but they do the job if you are a level service or maybe even the beach where a bottle jack will just sink in the sand. But it's very important to think twice before you start pumping that guy up because it can lift the car very quickly and you need to be ready for it
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Reply By: Member - Vincent A M (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:29

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2006 at 17:29
Most exhaust jacks are poorly made & will not give you your moneys worth i 've made plenty over the years using high quality Inflatable boat fabric (hypalon 1680 denier or the best is achiles 2 ply hypalon fabric) when made correctly & most are not they work well for want they are designed for but most people try to use them well beyond there design & have problems. A hypalon fabric one will cost a hell of lot more but 10 year warranty on fabric, can clean it with nearly any chemical, Ive put 2 small holes in mine in twenty years & i always carry it if im doing any sand work but i normally travel alone (1 4WD) if there was 2 i would proberly use the snatch strap
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