What annexe combination do you use on camper trailer?

Submitted: Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 22:51
ThreadID: 54133 Views:5674 Replies:13 FollowUps:23
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Hi,

We are (still!) looking at Camper's.

I am keen on getting a full annexe but my husband doesn't agree we need one. He thinks a fly annexe would be fine. I think it would be good since we have 3 kids. That way if it rains, you have an extra room to be in. Also, in the cold ( and we often camp in the cold), anything stored in it would not be covered in condensation in the mornings.

What do you think? Is it worth paying the extra up front for one? I know you could get it later, but as if we would!

Who has one, but never uses it?

I am interested in what combinations work best?

Thanks!
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Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:03

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:03
Hi Karicher,

I have a full annexe for my Camprite but have never used it in 12 months and ~10 trips. The most I have used is one wall for a windbreak, but I haven't camped more than 4 nights straight at the same place or had really bad weather so it still may come into its own.

On my previous van, I also had a full annexe and I did use it 2 or 3 times in 4 years, but only when staying put for a week or so. There was one occasion it was used during wet weather and only staying 3 nights.

Basically an annexe is a lot of work to put up compared to my camper setup so it rarely gets used, especially as we don't need the room it creates. But I guess it is good insurance if the weather turns bad and its the reason I carry it.

Cheers

Captain
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Follow Up By: karicher - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:19

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:19
Thanks Captain,

How much longer does it actually take to set up a full annexe?

We rarely camp for more then 4 nights. Hubby is a sub contractor, so we don't get paid holidays!
Perhaps we would be better with just the kitchen wall. At least that way the kitchen shouldn't get too wet with condensation or rain.

Perhaps you can help me with another question?

We never really camp off road. On the odd occasion we have gone on a dirt road but mostly we go where the roads are normal. We don't have a 4wd drive. We don't really like caravan parks, prefer to stay in National Parks etc.
When I look at the Campers, I like the look of the Off Road ones. Perhaps they just look tougher! But really, we should just look at a basic On Road option shouldn't we? If we get an On Road one, do you know anything that I should look at up grading? Whats the most important thing to look for?
Theres no point buying what I don't need I guess!
Sorry, I just have so many brochures and prices and cant decide what to do!
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Follow Up By: Member - Captain (WA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:45

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:45
Setup times vary so much but are camper type dependant. For example, my Camprite has no pegs or guy ropes and can be setup in less than 5 minutes. It also has the beds (1 double and 2 singles) already made so you can literally go to bed without further setup. I reckon its the best family camper trailer on the market IMHO.

The pic below shows the awning setup and one side of the annexe which needs pegs and guy ropes, I reckon this takes 10-15 minutes to setup and probably longer to take down - very big differnce compared to the ease of the camper setup.
!MPG:16!
Whereas a 'softfloor" camper will need the floor pegged out (some ground is like concrete and each peg can take minutes) and often need guy ropes as well. A typical softfloor camper would take ~20 minutes to setup and then you need to make the kids beds up on the floor area.

But your budget will be a big determining factor. Softfloors start at around $6,000 (new) and the sky is the limit whereas a Camprite starts at around $25,000 and quickly gets to over $30,000 with options.

While you don't currently have a 4WD, I am sure you will progress to one in time to access some of the better campsites (also generally less crowded as the 2WD's cannot get there!). Check out some of the camp` sites on my rig pics below, you need a 4WD for most of these!

The main difference in an offroad camper is the suspension. On-road versions generally have light duty suspension and chassis not made for the pounding of corrugated roads - check out the Camper trailers article on this site.

One thing I would recommend before buying one is to hire one - you will very quickly learn what you do/don't need before you spend your hard earned $$$ and the expense of hiring may save you plenty.

Cheers

Captain
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Follow Up By: Member - lyndon K (SA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:56

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:56
Best camper captain as a Tvan! But the lady would have to trade in the kids though! Thank god i had a vasectomy at 19 :) LOL
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Reply By: Member - nigel P (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:27

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:27
my thoughts: annexes great in the rain, but also in buggy conditions: eg march flies in the alps, sandflies and mozzies elsewhere. You'll never bother putting it up for one or 2 nights, but be glad you have whenever you do. i'm with your hubby on a fly annex though, lighter to carry and put up, they keep out rain pretty well (and certainly condensation, which is worse when you seal the heat in), and you aren't really going to stay long anywhere in miserable weather. Unless maybe snow camping!!
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Follow Up By: Member - nigel P (NSW) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:31

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:31
ps : A light off road from a good manufacturer will cover you for all options except hard core stuff, and will give you peace of mind. A couple of K's extra is nothing compared to the risk of gettingstuck on some lonely tracj, and it means you can do something adventurous too.
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Follow Up By: karicher - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:37

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:37
Thanks for that.

So you think I would get more condensation in a full annexe then a half annexe with fly? Interesting. Perhaps hubby is right - this time :)

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Follow Up By: Member - nigel P (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 13:17

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 13:17
Actually, condensation is genreally only a problem with warm bodies and moist breath in the tent area, when the outside air gets cold. So it wouldn't be a problem in an annex anyway. My thoughts are more driven by the fact that we never use our annex without having the windows rolled up, and imagine that would only change if stuck somewhere in really foul weather (and you tend to leave then, anyway).

Some good advice above about the types of trailers: if you go for a light off road you'll be covered for future options, and it will retain value. With kids, only soft floors genreally give ample sleeping space for four, and I like the door at the trailer end, to maximise the usable space. As to time to erect, most good soft tops are up in 5 to 10 minutes, without the annex.

Check the forums for advice, there are a few brands tat are consistently positivley rated: Trackabout, jumbuck, heaslip, are a few that come to mind.
np
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Reply By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:38

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:38
I have a KISS camper or should I say a self modified heavy duty one anyway.

It takes 5 minutes to set up, and another 5 minutes to put the annex up, the annex is enclosed either end and has a full front zip on fly screen.

The camper folds out to 16 square meters.

After my resent trip and watching people put up many different campers, I found mine looked like the easiest.

All I do is unzip the cover, then pull the excess floor of the top and then unfold, I the get inside and push the end out tighten the 2 twist knobs so as to hold the end out, 4 pegs and thats it.the annex sits on the bed and if its going to be set up for a couple of days, it takes 2 minutes to zip on and 5 ropes, the fly screen if you need it takes 1 to 2 minutes tops to zip on.

In fact it takes longer to type this than to set up the camper. LOL

Cheers Steve
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Reply By: Member - Mick O (VIC) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:45

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:45
Trust me...when the wind is howling and the rain is travelling horizontally (as it does between March and May anywhere in the south of any state), you will thank your lucky stars you bought a FULL annex for you camper trailer!!!

Buy it! Mick.
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Reply By: Member - lyndon K (SA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:51

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:51
Hi
I wouldn't bother with the full annexe to start of with. Buy it if you find you need it.
This might seem like a silly idea but what about a dome tent?
We have 2 they are about 3.3mts x 3.3 meters. Oz trails i think they are. Not to expensive,easy to set up. You can just set it up just a fly/mossie etc tent or put the fly over the top if going to rain. Plenty big enough for all 5 of you to sit in around a table. They are quite high so head room is not an issue,unless you are over 6ft6 :).
Could also be used for the kids to sleep in when they get a bit older.
If you would like a picture of the tent just message me.
Good luck
Lyndon
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Follow Up By: Member - lyndon K (SA) - Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:51

Friday, Feb 01, 2008 at 23:51
opps,my email if you need it is
lkbm@internode.on.net
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Reply By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 00:31

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 00:31
Hi Karicher .....

I agree with lyndon above ..... for your needs you could possibly get by with a Dome Tent.

Have a look at picture No. 6 on My Rig page. Add that to your Camper Trailer outfit and you will have heaps of room.

It is a 6EV Model, which simply means it is a 6 person tent with an EXTENDED VESTIBULE. That EV concept is great, two kids could sleep there [big enough for a double swag !], two adults plus in the main dome and with the 'passageway' flaps down .... heaps more room for storage/dogs/wet gear/stuff ......

It is so easy to set up and get down ..... even blokes can do it !!
Packs into a fairly small duffle bag and is nice and light !!
Really handy tent.......... iffen I remeber correctly it cost around $

You will also see my 'new CamperTent top' in the rig photo's .... I also have an annex for that ..... the annex roof gets zipped on to the main tent and acts as an awning [poles only -no ropes!] and the annex walls might take an extra ten minutes [max] to velcro into place ............

My trip requirements would decide which rig or combination I would take .... it has become soooooo versatile !!!!
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 00:50

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 00:50
Oooooops ??

Really handy tent.......... iffen I remeber correctly it cost around $
Should read :

Really handy tent.......... iffen I remember correctly it cost around $120 BUT keep your eyes open for Easter Specials and get last years models probably around $100 ....

PS .... mine is an Oztent 6EV PLUS , which includes that extra two-person sleeping area, the EV being just the vestibule area. And dont fall for the 6-person crip ..... 2 adults and three kids OK. Six adults would need to be really special friends ????
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 01:52

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 01:52
Another plus for the Dome .... you can stand up in it, even iffen you're 6 ft tall!
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Follow Up By: jjt98 - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 08:33

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 08:33
Hi Pedro,
Looking at your new trailer tent, did it come from Armadillo campers? If not it is the same as they supply. I am looking at buying one myself. Can you please tell me what they are like. I would prefer a 9 foot tent but may have to settle for the 12 foot. Is it too big (for caravan park sites etc), is it well designed, would you change anything (or not buy one), is the anclosed awning practical & easy to set up etc.
Sorry for all the questions. your feed back would be invaluable to me.
Cheers
Jason
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 02:27

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 02:27
Hi Jason....

Yep, it is an ArmaDillo unit.

I ordered it last year and it was delivered just before Christmas. So far haven't yet used it in battle .... only the backyard to get the hang of it. This is a MUST DO step, as all CamperTents aren't born equal !!

Mine is the 12 ft model. I specifically chose this size on account of ' it's size!' I just love roughing it in comfort and here size does matter. Generally there is just me and the Beagle inhabiting it .... but always with provision for the missus. I'm not that silly.

SET-UP ; This is pretty much easy and is basically the same for all/most/some other tops .... ie park somewhere/ pull off the vinyl top [ plonk it over the front of your trailer or underneath] / loosen/undo the straps and pull up the first section.

[Facing the REAR of the trailer the tent opens to the RIGHT hand side !!] Important to remember this.

The rest is fairly easy ....... the set-up sheet that comes with the tent is best used immediately as toilet paper !! Waste of space !!

Annex roof can be left off if required orZIPPED on simply as a full length awning ....... no ropes required unless very windy or you are a fussy coot who likes things s\ship-shape .... as I are !!

Iffen you put up the sidewalls, these are Velcro'd on.

Awning screen windows are large and very airy ....... great for flow-thru ventilation and light. Bed windows are nice and large, too. All screens have ZIPPED awnings, Velcro's at the bottom.

Poles are good, the awning roof ones are a little tricky to work out, considering you have used the instruction sheet for loo paper ..... there is no mention at all on the fitting of poles !

Stitching appears to be OK, but untested by me yet. Most all seams leaked, but this is normal. There are other threads here which you probably will have seen already.

Canvas is light but appropriate for the job. Flooring appears reasonably suitable for it's purpose.

FAULTS/FLAWS :

First, bear in mind that this is a relatively inexpensive unit, as opposed to a 'cheap' unit .... there is a difference. I imagine that most of these would not be apparent in a $4000-5000 unit !!

LACK of decent Instruction Sheet is not good ... I managed mainly 'cause I'd previously owned another unit.

FLOOR of the tent would be better served with higher side upturns [ or bucket concept] instead of floor and walls meeting at ground level .

LADDER to the bed is round pipe construction, thusly very hard on the feet. I intend ditching it and putting in a set of KMart folding kitchen Steps [ladder] which would also be useful for other things around the camp. Climbing into the high bed would be painful and 'unsightly' to say the least , without this style of step.

MATTRESS is huge and really great in size, but too thin and needs to be augmented with egg-carton foam underlay .... then it would be perfect! But it is adequate , unless you are in the Sumo wrestler category!

SIZE : remember it is the width of your trailer PLUS 12 feet without the awning/annex. Not a problem for me as 98.25% of my camping is pure bush camping [I go prospecting!] thus footprint area is not a consideration. I can't really see the footprint being a drawback in most caravan parks .... but my experience there is limited.

WEIGHT : the bloody thing weighs in at around 150 kgs PLUS whatever else you will load on top of the bed.

NO GAS STRUTS are supplied with the unit so iffen you want access to the inside of the trailer whilst travelling your missus needs really massive arm developement to hold all that up whilst you rummage around looking for your sunnies/fags/whatever.
If she lets go .... boom boom !!

But OVERALL :
I think is is a great tent for it's price and should be perfect as a first CamperTop, to learn the ways neccessary to make a good camp. For overnight stops forget the awning .... only use it for longer stays. Poles come in their own bag, as does the ladder. There is a tentpeg bag with tons of pegs and adequate ropes/cordage to rope it down.


I would almost always rig up a LARGE silver Tarp as a fly, so useful for preventing condensation inside, keeping the sun at bay and preventing the bird deposits on the top of the tent. Some of the birds up here seem to subsist on a diet of araldite, black molasses and hydrochloric acid !!!

If yopu get top do the 'bush' thing this is the ideal and inexpensive solution. More than adequate for a family .... just barely OK for me and the Beagle !!!

Feel free to MM if you need more ............






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Follow Up By: Member - jjt98 (QLD) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 10:16

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 10:16
Thanks Pedro. Great info. Appreciate it.
Cheers
Jason
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Follow Up By: karicher - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 15:16

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 15:16
Hi Pedro,

How much is one of these worth?

I have come across a brand new one, never used for $5,500. Should I buy???? I'm sure it's a 12ft.
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:57

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:57
Hi Karicher ....

Google is your friend, as soimebody keeps saying on here !!!
Try Armadillo Campers and you'll get all you need.

FYI their home page has a good picture of a brand new unit at $9000 !!

If the unit you have 'on tap' looks anything like this then go for it ..... the money you save you can spend on other goodies to make your camping 'really' comfortable.

Jason [above] is calling in to Armadillo on Weds. so he may have further info .....

If you like you can eMail me at pedro the one at bigpond dot com dot hey you and I can give you my views on it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:58

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:58
Hi Karicher ....

Google is your friend, as soimebody keeps saying on here !!!
Try Armadillo Campers and you'll get all you need.

FYI their home page has a good picture of a brand new unit at $9000 !!

If the unit you have 'on tap' looks anything like this then go for it ..... the money you save you can spend on other goodies to make your camping 'really' comfortable.

Jason [above] is calling in to Armadillo on Weds. so he may have further info .....

If you like you can eMail me at pedro the one at bigpond dot com dot hey you and I can give you my views on it.
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Reply By: Mainey (wa) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 01:21

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 01:21
Definately get the full annex

You won't regret it, you don't have to use it fully set up all the time, just when you NEED it.

As the first pic on my 'Rig picture' shows mine has fold up front an side walls so I get a good choice of combinations available to me.

One day you will NEED it an if you don't have it your 'upset'

Mainey . . .
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 07:58

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 07:58
Yep, If you camp more than a couple of times a year, in different weather conditions, an annex is an indispensable addition.

Not only does it keep the rain off when wet, but keeps the sun off as well. Shade is very important in hot, sunny conditions.

My camper is a soft floor and opens sideways to the "starboard" side. The annex then runs across the full width of the back, thus placing a roof over the cooking and living area.

Although the annex zips on, I leave it attached full time. It only takes four extra poles & ropes to support it and being a soft floor, storage space for the annex when flipped back over the collapsed cabin area is not an issue.
Each side (end) has a canvas panel attachment, also zipped on, but I generally only use the left side which gives a windbreak over the cooking area.
The whole front and optionally the right hand side can be enclosed with insect mesh panels and this does take a while to erect. I have only found the need to use this option once.

Tell your husband if you don't get the annex, your not going:-))

Bill


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Reply By: Member - Duncs - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 08:54

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 08:54
We have had a Trak Shak for 11yrs now and we have 3 kids. When we bought it our kids were 8, 4 and 3.

What the Captain was saying about set of soft floor campers may be true of the others but not of the TrakShak.

It sets up in 6 min, this was timed by work mates when I set it up once in the yard at work to dry out and I did not know they had the watch running. Minimum set up, which is what we use 75% of the time is 2 pegs, 2 poles and 2 guy ropes. The kitchen is versatile allowing it to be used either inside the camper or placed in the position of choice outside. The only non enclosed area is the permanently attached awning (roof only). This is quite small and if we are staying put for a while and I can't get trees for shade, I set up a tarp to provide extra protection, this is rare when camping in the bush. We have a 'wall' that attaches to two sides of the awning for a windbreak, we have used this quite a bit.

The Trak Shak has massive storage area and 2 queen size beds, we carry an extra foam mattress for the 3rd child. Beds remain made when we pack up.

In the 11yrs we have been using it we have set up in the rain once. We raced the storm to the campsite and came a close second. It was only an overnight stop so we left the camper coupled to the car. I jumped out and commenced set up while the family sat in the car to keep dry. Less than 2 min later the kids were sitting on their beds playing cards and the missus had the stove fired up for dinner while I finsihed putting in the only two pegs we used that night. Internal access to the storage area means that there was no need to venture out into the rain again.

The Trak Shak has the biggest internal area of any camper I have seen and the two QS beds are up off the floor. This is where the kids sit to play if the weather is bad leaving the main floor area clear for other things.

This got longer than I intended sorry, I hope what I have said is relevant to the discussion. People often write off things because they don't like one example of the type. There are a lot of campers out there, particularly soft floor, that I would not give you 2 bob for but they are not all the same.

That Camprite of yours Captain looks good and if I ever see you in the bush I will be asking for a tour, please don't think I am bagging it, I am not I don't know anything about it so would be a fool to comment.

To answer the question about the full v fly annexe, I don't see many full annexes set up in the bush, and I am seeing less set up in CV Parks too.

Duncs

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Follow Up By: Member - Captain (WA) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 11:11

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 11:11
Hi Duncs,

No offence taking at all mate. As you say, there are heaps of different types of campers on the market and one can hardly describe all the differences in a quick reply. Even the one type, soft floors, have so many variations one could barley list them all.

The Trakshak seems to be a good camper, always gets good reviews on here. Its all about what suits the individual and what the preferences are. There are many good campers on the market and all have trade-offs in their design - gets down to what suits you best and your budget.

Cheers

Captain
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Follow Up By: karicher - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 12:03

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 12:03
I would LOVE a Track Shak, but they are out of our budget :(

I have 3 kids, 3, 5, 7yrs. I'm sure it would be the best camper for us, but I dont have $25K to spend :(

I have about $13,000ish to spend.
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Follow Up By: Pete and Lez - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 16:20

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 16:20
Karicher, I reckon you could find a second hand T/Shack for $13,000, or pretty close.
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncs - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 18:28

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 18:28
Karicher,

Al & Mrs Al have a Trak Shak for sale in the Trader section of this site for $18,000.

Al has made a few mods to the camper which seem to make it a little more useable.

Might be worth a look.

Duncs
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Reply By: Member - Alan H (Narangba QLD - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 09:00

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 09:00
Our Aussie camper is an offroad hard floor.

This means we can pull up, flip over the floor and the tent is there without any pegs. This means sites such as gravel beds, rock slabs, roadbase dumps, etc make good dustless campsites.

The offroad bit means it will not shake itself to bits. Ours has been dragged through Vic high country, up the cape and out west.

Due to limited time availability for trips, we tend to keep on the move and rarely camp in the same place more than one night. We have a small and a large annex but these need poles and pegs etc. We tend to only use them on odd occasion where we might end up in a caravan park. Gives privacy and claims space.

In short, we rarely use them (wet annexes are not fun) but it relates to lifestyle. At the moment we are always on the move. If your lifestyle is to camp in one place for several days then the effort of an annex would be worth it for shade etc.

As said before Screen walls work well and let breeze in, bugs out and not the same weight and problem if wet.

Alan
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Follow Up By: Mogul - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 09:14

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 09:14
Alan,

Very good point regarding the surface you are setting up on.

On our trip from Perth to Sydney last year every spot but one we camped on was either gravel or dirt, even at the caravan parks we stayed at. It wouldn't have been fun in a softfloor camper especially as it rained on and off all the way.

If people can afford a hard floor as opposed to a softfloor I would always recommend it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 10:04

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 10:04
I'm not sure of your logic re soft floored campers, mine does not
require pegging down & can be set up on any surface. I use shade cloth ground sheet & remove anything likely to cause damage. While I have nothing against hard floored models, I hardly
thinkweather conditions or the percieved need for pegs are
critical considerations if making a decision re one or the other.
cheers...oldbaz.
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Reply By: Axel [ the real one ] - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 16:05

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 16:05
Tell hubby that having a campertrailer without an annex / full walls is like having a stubby without a stubby holder ,, ,,, dont always need or want it but when you do whos to blame ?
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Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 21:29

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 21:29
Hell!,
What a thread. O.K Here goes.

My wife and I have a camper/tent trailer. We ordered a custom built job and at the time I certainly wanted the awning but was less keen on the annexe. Christine suggested we get the annexe at the time and not muck around cause we would need it if we set up for any length of time and it would keep out the nasty flying thingies.

Six years and countless trips and kilometres later we have used the full annexe twice! Yep bloody twice.

1) It takes twice to three times as long to fit the annexe as it does to put up the camper.

2) In hot weather the camper gets very damn hot and muggy.

3) It gets even hotter when you have the gas stove going inside the annexe.

4) It does not keep out the flying/buzzing thingies, it just traps them all inside.

5) After one lot of wet weather, the second time we used it, we had a wet, soggy, heavy, as in very heavy mass to try and fold up in the mud and pack away.

6) An annexe will not stop condensation unless fully open and then you have a problem with dew and its' no longer an annexe.

If anyone out there has a Halls Off-road Camper I have an annexe for sale - at a give away price.

What we found after experimentation was to purchase a silver poly tarp/fly sheet. It goes over the top of the camper and projects well out the front in place of the original zip on awning ( I also have an awning for sale).

The fly sheet provides an air space between it and the camper canvas, the result bing a much cooler tent in summer. The elimination of condensation inside the camper in winter, not to mention it being quicker to pit up, lighter to handle and smaller to pack away.

Now when it comes to the kids, as stated previously, give them their own dome tent. They will love you for it. Besides you will buy a tent for a fraction of the price the damned annexe will cost.

Ian
AnswerID: 285212

Follow Up By: karicher - Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 22:10

Saturday, Feb 02, 2008 at 22:10
Interesting. Thanks for your great post!

I'm not keen on a dome tent, YET, for the kids. They are still all pretty young (3,5,7) and the oldest is a girl who is a bit of a scaredy cat!

We have a good tent already. Black Wolf Turbo Lite Twin. I just like the fact the camper trailers can be packed ready to go all the time. I also like they have awnings for shade.

Who thought buying a camper would be so stressful!


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FollowupID: 550037

Reply By: Geoff & Karen - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 10:22

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 10:22
We had a full annex made for our camper for the exact same reasons you want one. We went away last Xmas and we had really bad weather and had to actually sit in the neighbours camper to get out of the rain and wind. He had a full annex and it was great to be able to sit in his out of the wind and rain. Get one made now and only use the walls if you need too! It's better to have it there to use, than get really bad wind or rain and sit there and say, "Geeze I wish we had an annex". You will only come home and get one made any way. We have our Kanga up for sale in the trader section at the moment, so you will be able to see the annex we had made n the pics in there. Hope this is enough to convince your hubby, If not, do what I do and just go out and order one any way!.. Good luck with it!
AnswerID: 285272

Follow Up By: karicher - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 22:21

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 22:21
Geez, sold already!

In a well travelled trailer, what does the canvas look like?
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FollowupID: 550330

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