How do you cook your steak?

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:27
ThreadID: 67537 Views:3610 Replies:18 FollowUps:45
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I have always loved a T- Bone steak!, cooked on a plate over a

Fire, But on some ocassions have seen them destroyed by the cook of the day consistentley turning them over & over.

Prefer to near cook one side first then turn it over,

Whats the right and wrong thing to do here...lol.


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: blue one - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:36

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:36
Mate,
Chuck it into a bucket of metho and then onto the hot plate.

Once the aromatic hydro carbons have burnt off slap it on to the plate and all is good.

Cheers

Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:47

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:47
What about petrol??
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Follow Up By: a convict - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 01:27

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 01:27
..amazing !!

This, I've got to try, even if it is just with a bit of very old hogget.

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Reply By: Top End Explorer Tours - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:37

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:37
60 one side 40 the other medium to well turn once.

DON'T PLAY WITH IT PLEASE.

Cheers Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:45

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:45
That sounds about it , Steve!.. LOl.



Chears Axle.
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Follow Up By: Top End Explorer Tours - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:51

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:51
A little sprinkle of beer every now and then doesn't hurt either.LOL

Cheers Steve.
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Reply By: Member - William H (WA) - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:46

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 22:46
Axel.....When you are at the B.B.Q.... and the "Cook" of the day is destroying the steak's, just move over and rescue the one you want, and cook it the way you like it, and cook it slow, i was at the medical centre the other day and found this story about B.B.Q's, wont stop me from having one.,Image Could Not Be Found

If you cant read it just copy it to your pictures and open it up and zoom in on it.

Cheers for now...William H...Bunbury...WA.
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Reply By: get outmore - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:13

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:13
mmmmm ive got a t bone tonight Im guilty of turning too often but I will refrain for you tonight


surest way to stuff em up is overcook them
- just till theres a hint of blood left
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Reply By: Kim and Damn Dog - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:25

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:25
Axle

I have a well proven method. First you take a juicy piece of meat, burn the crap out of it, and continue to do so until it resembles a piece of volcanic rock.

Under no circumstances attempt to eat it yourself. Give it to a mate, and then wait for a well cooked steak from the other fella who knows what he’s doing!

LOL

Regards

Kim
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Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:31

Saturday, Apr 04, 2009 at 23:31
Kim!..Hahahahahahaha, one way to sort it out!, Thats for sure.


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: stumbly - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 00:11

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 00:11
line from a movie a few years ago - waitress asks texan about how he would like his steak cooked. reply - "knock its horns off, wipe its a_s and chuck it on a plate!"
sorry, not helpful I know, but still makes me laugh!
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Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 00:15

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 00:15
LOL LOL.LOL.!


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 05:55

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 05:55
I owned a Steakhouse Restaurant for 7 years. Had many Chefs during that time and did quite a bit myself. Our's was often favourably compared with The Breakfast Creek Hotel.

The best way to cook a steak is to get the cooking surface (be it a pan or a grill) as hot as hell. Add a bit of oil if it is a pan. Throw the Steak in, cook for a minute or two and turn it over. This seals in the juice. After that continue cooking with another two turns (to keep the colour on both sides the same) until it is done to your liking.

If you like well done meat you will need to turn the heat down to avoid burning. Also need to turn it down for medium if it is a very thick steak.

The "only turn it once" theory results in a dry steak as a lot of the juice boils/steams out of the uncooked top prior to it being turned and sealed.

Also very important is the quality of the steak. If you're buying from a supermarket, avoid the lovely pink, fresh looking stuff. The darker the colour of the meat the better. You will often find this marked down as most punters go for the pink stuff, so you can get very good meat, cheap.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:28

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:28
Pleased to read someone knows how to cook a steak!!
Jim has some good advice.
I have been cooking steak the same way for years.
Hot cooking surface for start, I like to flick it over twice as well, seal in the juice and also the flavour.
I like my steak rare so by then it is ready to eat.
Enjoy
Russ
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:42

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:42
Russ,

I'm a Blue/Rare man myself. I tend to buy whole Rump or Scotch Fillet and cut it extra thick. This way I can get a good charred crust whilst still having 80% of the middle raw.

Most precut meat is too thin to get decent colour on it without overcooking it.

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 08:27

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 08:27
Yeah, spot on Jim.

Cook as you have suggested.
I also prefer a Rump, Porterhouse, or Scotch Fillet cut thick and cooked medium rare.

The problem I had with a T-bone is that after eating the small "fillet" quality bit on on side of the bone, the rest of the meat was fairly ordinary by comparison.

Bill

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 08:36

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 08:36
Bill,

T Bones are a bastard of a thing to cook. Near impossible on a plate or pan as the bone keeps the meat above the contact with plate. You end up with it well done on the outside and rare near the bone.

Better over a grill but still cook unevenly. Not my favourite steak, I find the Portehouse side to be a bit "cardboardy" and the Eye Fillet side to be tender, but tasteless.

Good Rump is hard to beat. Full of flavour and quite tender if good quality.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: slammin - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:49

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:49
As a chef I tested the pink vs darker red meat. We got the same cuts same cooking style and times etc only difference was the colour. We cooked about a doz of each and tested with @ punters and staff. Pink was the choice for more than 2/3 of the crowd.

The thing I point out though it's the same arguments with wine. If you like a $10 cask go for it. At the end of the day you can only ever really please yourself.


Bon appetit.
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Follow Up By: slammin - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:55

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 11:55
Sorry that was @50 staff and punters.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:08

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:08
Yes I agree, people who are accustomed to poor meat or wine may have developed a taste for it and find it quite satisfactory. There's nothing wrong with that.

Similarly some of life's real pleasures such as a good feed of Lamb's Fry have become unfashionable as people brought up on bland food simply don't like it. It's easy to understand why.

Let's face it, McDonald's Hamburgers are popular, but I find them to lack any real flavour. They're not offensive, neither are they distinctive.

Cheers,

Jim.



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Follow Up By: slammin - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:25

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:25
[QUOTE]Yes I agree, people who are accustomed to poor meat or wine may have developed a taste for it and find it quite satisfactory. There's nothing wrong with that. [/QUOTE]

Yeah but ......... my point is a bit different let me put it this way, one of my favourite places on the WWW is Choice. they regularly get the experts in and test wines, champers, beer and no surprises that a $10 bottle of champers, sorry sparkly LOL comes out ahead of the +$20 jobbies.

The issue is that these items are popular because they appeal to a majority not because of the price but the taste, the price is determined by and large by market forces and supply and where the seller sees the greatest profit. If cask wine was terrible nobody would drink it.

The trick is when you do find a good cheap item don't tell anybody. LOL
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:30

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:30
I like your thinking Slam.

We took a bottle of humble Minchinbury to a BYO restaurant one night. We were laughed out of town for our poor choice.

I tried to explain that it had been "Blind" tested against all other sub $15 fizzies and got the vote. This was also in a Choice test.

Make no mistake, I do enjoy a drop of Chateau Cardboard. Always enjoyed Banrock Station or De Bortoli, but now have found Lachlan Ridge (exclusive to Coles) to be quite acceptable.

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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:52

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:52
Do much the same myself Jim
Travelling, I buy a slab, Sirloin/ Fillet/ Rump. from a real butcher.Get it cut in about 4' 100 mm and sychrovaced, 4 steaks, but can be roasted whole for a change, always bit of cold left over for lunch anyway.
Last slab I got in Alice was a chunk of eye fillet, nice as steak but a bit mushy when roasted, only charged the same as rump.
Beef Lamb Venison even Goat always cooks better and on well seasoned cast.
Do not let any detergent near ithe plate / pan to clean. Add a bit off water, bring it to the boil, rinse, boil again, wipe and then oil lightly with veg oil, keep the flavour in the cast.
Hey
Enjoy
Russ
If you poke it with the fork and it does not kick.
Get Eating.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 11:15

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 11:15
regarding dark meat.

I never knew why some meat was dark but i often took home the dark cuts for free. consumers avoid it like the plague and often we just chucked it straight in the mince

some of the nicest steak i had was dark

however there is another reason for dark steak which basically is caused by an animal having low blood suger. This is very bad as it stops the forming of lactic acid so basically the meat cant hang.

the high PH means it is not firm and feels like fresh muscle rather than firm meat - it is tough and gos off very quickly.

meat like this is pretty easy to pick as besides being dark it just doesnt seem like normal meat
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Follow Up By: slammin - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 12:46

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 12:46
I was taught the colour of the meat is mainly an indication of how long it has been aged. I guess there is more to it than just that, diet and exercise and maybe sugar levels could all affect the colour.

Aged meat costs more and is theoretically of higher quality, more tender and more flavour but as I showed above what we are suppoesed to like as determined by connoiseurs is different to what most people actually like.

Also beware meat that is too pink as it could of been covered with, I think it's a type of sulphar or something that helps meat retain it's colour it is illegal as it is potentially an allergenic and I'm sure it's just not good for you and yes it is still out there.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 13:48

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 13:48
not really - dark meat wont age it just gos off as it lacks the low PH to inhibit bacteria

this probabally explains it best

dark cutting meat
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Follow Up By: slammin - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 14:12

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 14:12
Cheers, interesting read.

Shows why chefs aren't butchers ; )

Case in point, I had to slaughter a goat ages ago then and we couldn't get the buggar to settle, we knew we had to just couldn't was the problem anyway, the meat was terrible. Didn't take much notice of the colour. Hmmm

Cheers again.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 18:52

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 18:52
Interesting read indeed.

It also mentioned that dark meat indicates an older beast. I had been told by an old beef farmer friend years ago that older steers give better meat. Hence my tendency to always buy dark meat.

But is clearly not the only reason for dark meat.

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 23:08

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 23:08
i have nothing to back this up as i experienced dark beef before i learnt about the reasons behing it so i had to apply my learnings to past memorys
and while i cant find anything backing it up
i wondered if there was other reasons behind dark beef

the meat thats talked about in that link was easy to spot
as i said it was frequently on the turn it was "gammy" and not set

but some dark meat appeared normal in every way except it was dark

while older meat can be darker from my experience it is also tougher (with variations ) i worked at a shop that got steer beef in "because it had more taste" and i just found the meat tough

the dark meat i speak of would have the same size and appearance (except dark) as the rest of the meat which is why i dont think just extra age is the X factor

no real explanations here but i will leave you with this

we got an exceptionally nice and tender batch of cheap yearling sirloin in and i got some dark steak from it FOC
i had my apprentice mate around who wouldnt have eaten dark steak and he agreed it was top notch and had changed his mind
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Reply By: Ozboc - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:29

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:29
Its all in the preparation ----


T-BOnes on a LARGE plate - a good splash of worshister sauce ( Spelling?) 1/2 tea spoon of fresh crush garlic on one side -- 20 min later flip over on the plate another small splash worshister, and sprinkle on some (Mc cormack) season all - peppered

sit for another 10 - 15 min - room temperature

Hot plate super hot - throw on t bones -- and for the love of god ....... DO NOT TURN OVER MORE THAN ONCE!!cook times vary - but if you like your steak mooing -- then 2 min on each side --- if you like pink in the middle -- look at the side of your steak and you can see where the cooking has penetrated through - flip only once - once i have fliped i actually turn my gas of to the BBQ as the hot plate has enough heat to continue cooking for the next 5 min with good heat ..... when the steak starts to bleed a little ( after being fliped -- ie through the cooked side -- TAKE IT OFF -- this will me medium - medium well done ...

Let sit for a few min ---- enjoy with a good beer

most common mistake is throwing everyting on at the same time ....

sausages / onions first

well done meat next

medium 5 -8min later

mooing and trying to jump off the hot plate 5 min later

Boc

Boc
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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 17:00

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 17:00
The English have always stuffed rhings up
Why add some of there sauce as well
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Reply By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:50

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 06:50
One other secret I learnt from a French Chef was the best ever mushroom sauce, it is not however Heart Foundation approved.

Chop mushrooms.
Stick a good knob of butter in a hot pan. Chuck in mushies.
Fry away until juice reduces to near nothing.
Add a good slurp of red wine.
Fry away until juice reduces to near nothing.
Tip in a good slurp of cream.
Cook until cream reduces to a good thick, syruppy consistency. If you take it too far and it gets too thick, just add a bit more cream.

Magnificent.

Cheers,

Jim.



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Follow Up By: Geoff M (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 10:37

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 10:37
Hey Jim,
For a slightly different flavour, substitute Dry Sherry instead of the red wine.

Geoff
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:20

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:20
Thanks Geoff, I'll give that a crack.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Louie the fly (SA) - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 15:15

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 15:15
I use that recipe for a sauce to have with chicken, except substitute the red wine for white and add some cracked pepper to the cream stage. Sometimes I simmer the chicken in the sauce as it reduces.

Louie
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Reply By: Member - Geoff the chef (NSW)M - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:25

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:25
with the price of meat these days, especially good quality meat,the best and quickest way to turn it into just an ordinary piece of meat is to turn it more than once.
If you have to turn it more than once........ stick to cooking snags...lol.
cheers Geoff
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Reply By: landed eagle - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:35

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:35
Watched a chef in one of Hobart's best steak restaurants cooking one evening. He was putting an old plate on the top side of the steak as it cooked. Turned the meat only once and placing the plate on the second side as before.

It must have kept the moisture in the meat instead of evaopating into the exhaust hood. Sensational steak!!

Tried it at home on the BBQ and was brilliant result.

Have since purchased a Weber Baby-Q and all other forms of BBQ-ing meat are redundant! :)..................unles I'm out of gas.
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Reply By: Member - Lionel A (WA) - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:58

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 07:58
Thankyou Gentlemen,

Some very useful advice.

My usual attemps at cooking steaks have had the Cooper Tyre Co hounding me for my 'secret process'.......lol.

Cant wait to fire up the barbie and give it another go.


Cheers......Lionel.

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Reply By: Member - Rob - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 09:51

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 09:51
Axle
I have Always preferred slow on one side and then I go the flip and slow on that side. Steak I mean!!!

I knew a butcher once that watched a work colleague cook a steak on a B.B.Q. and he saw him pour beer over the steak and didn't he go off. It was the biggest dummy spit I have ever seen. He said that it compromises the integrity of the steaks juices and natural flavours. Anyway who cares, it is what works for you.
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Follow Up By: StormyKnight - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:12

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 13:12
40-60 rule
For Well done streak i.e. not red in the middle at all..

Pan must be of descent density. i.e. thick aluminium or cast iron
Start with a hot pan, on my electric stove its position 7 out of 12

Wait at least 5 minutes for the pan to be evenly heated

Place meat in pan & wait till there is the first sign of blood coming thru the top side....the first sign! OR even better just before...if you watch you can see the changes & learn the timing.

Flip & wait till you are happy with the color of the second side.

Generally about 40% front & 60% back in terms of time because there is a lot of stored heat in the pan when you start.

On the BBQ, I have the settings on minumum, but again the plate has to be well heated before starting.

Cheers



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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:37

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:37
Fellas,

With all due respect, that is the way to ruin good meat. It is the way my Grandmother used to cook it.

Just try what I have suggested, cook it very hot to seal it, then back off the heat if you like it well cooked. You can still have a piece of Well Done Steak with some juice left in it.

Please try it.

Slow cooking only stews steak, pale tasteless surface, tough as an old boot.

Please give it a try.

Regards,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:55

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 14:55
G/Day Jim, Well this Topic got your motor started..LOL.


Sound advice there, wonder how many steaks got experimented with to-Day?..lol.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 17:30

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 17:30
Axle,

Just trying to help. Not a topic I want to argue about. I do like good food and have had a lot of involvement in the food game. I've worked with a lot of good Chefs and a lot of shockers.

I've learnt a lot over the years. Some Chefs have the happy knack of being able to add a little something to get a magnificent flavour and others are heavy handed. It is truly an art.

I can hold my own with most good Chefs, but some of the geniuses I have worked with simply amazed me. Still, my style is somewhat old hat. I'll cook you a sensational Beef Wellington, but a Fillet of Atlantic Salmon on a bed of Rocket with a dressing of Lime, Lemon Grass and the Juice of Roasted Cane Toad Gonads is just not my thing LOL.

It's been a good thread.

Cheers,

Jim.



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Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 15:58

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 15:58
I think one of the essential things that may have been missed so far is resting the steak between cooking and consumption. Apart from selection of quality steak, it is perhaps the most important thing.

I generally follow Jim's cooking technique. Start with plate / grill / pan very hot. If a pan, ensure it has a thick bottom. Sear both sides for a minute or so, then back off the heat and cook to your liking. I normally cook each side twice (once on high, once on medium heat) On very thick steaks (like 2 inch thick fillets) I cover with a metal basin on the plate AFTER backing off the heat.

When the steak is a little under cooked to your preference, remove from the pan and place on either a wooden board or a warm (not hot) metal surface and cover with alfoil to rest. Using a wooden board or warm metal prevents too much cooling - as does the alfoil. The steak will continue to cook, that is why you remove it a little early. Let rest for a few to several minutes, the thicker the steak, generally the longer the rest, but I regard 3 or 4 minutes as the minimum.

The key points are:
- Start with quality steak

- Cook for about 1 minute each side on a HOT surface

- Back of heat (a much as 50%) and cook both sides to 'taste' -generally a 20mm thick steak only needs another minute or so each side to be medium rare.

- Remove, cover and rest for a few minutes -longer for thick cuts.

Might take a couple of times to get the timing right. You are generally more likely to overcook than undercook due to underestimating the amount the meat continues to cook after removing it from the plate and esting it, so err on the side of undercooking - you can always put it back on the plate for a bit more cooking if necessary, but you cannot 'uncook' it if you overdo it.

Give it a go. I'll be surprised if you are not happy with it.

Norm C

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Reply By: WillyWish - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 19:56

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 19:56
Any ideas for a pepper sauce?
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 20:26

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 20:26
Get a small can of green peppercorns (from the supermarket), open and drain off the brine.

Put some (how many depends on your taste) in a pan with a slurp of white wine. Simmer until the wine reduces, then whack in a slurp of cream and simmer until it reduces to a saucy consistency. Then add a good screw of freshly ground black pepper, stir and pour over the steak.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Top End Explorer Tours - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 20:45

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 20:45
First caramelize a finely chopped onion in Butter, then add to taste some crushed pepper corns and mix through, add a little red/white wine then some thickened cream and simmer and reduce to a thick sauce.

By the way Jim, I have cooked thousands of steaks over the years, I have cooked them the same way as my post above, I have been complimented by many chefs from around the world, all this on a BBQ plate in the middle of the bush cooked on coals.

Cheers Steve.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 21:29

Sunday, Apr 05, 2009 at 21:29
Steve,

Cooking steaks over a red hot fire on a steel plate is just superb. I don't doubt that you have never satisfied your guests. The hot plate, smokey hue, all adds to the flavour that cannot be achieved on the stove at home.

Fine cooking is an art, it would seem you have mastered it.

I like your idea of the onion, it is in my opinion the Master ingredient.

Such a versatile veggie.

Cheers,

Jim.



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Reply By: Rod W - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 10:55

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 10:55
Wrapped in foil and then into the hot coals... getting the lenght of time in the coals is the trick. This method of cooking in the coals can be done with a miriad of foods.
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Reply By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 15:57

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 15:57
This topic opened up a can, worms?.
Well done Axle'
We have been breeding, growing, finishing slaughtering, aging ,and yes eating Beef for almost as long as 'Bovines" arrived.
The end product is still good anyway!.
High PH in meat is the result of Lactic Acid built up from Stress, the more stress the higher the PH.
The best meat you can get is from an animal quietly standing just picked up a mouthful of forage.
A 150 gr copper jacketed projectile passes through the brain at around 2,800 ft per sec, exits through the Atlas bone, whip in fast, cut the jugular, and then get blood up the arm as you open up the arteries, same as sticking a pig.
Skin Drop the gut, don't forget to try up the Anus etc, a bit of Flax is handy to have,
If you can let let it sit, the most important of all hang in a cool fly free place, winter in NZ might be 3 weeks or so.
Aging will affect the colour and improve the taste.
I must admit I have been pleasantly surprised by the beef I have bought in Aus, always from a butcher and then had it cut and syrovaced.
Up to the individual what they do with if from there?.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 17:39

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 17:39
not quite right

lactic acid isnt a result from a stressed animal. what the stress does is lower the blood sugers. Now normally sugars is converted to energy with the prescense of oxygen. A dead animal has no O2 to convert sugers to energy so they are converted to lactic acid.

this happens post mortem and brings the PH of the beef down to just above 5.
this does 2 things - first of all the PH of the meat means it slows bacteria growth.
this allows you to hang the meat - if it remains the same PH as upon death it will go off quickly.
second is the higher PH will start attacking cell walls releasing the enzmes within. these enzymes start breaking the stucture of the meat - kind of digesting it

these actions all go together to bring about "hanging " of the meat

it gos wrong with stressed animal - low blood suger- no lactic acid formation - no low PH meat = tougher meat that gos off faster
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 19:53

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 19:53
Too much science here for my liking.

Good Beef comes from well fed Steers who don't have to walk to far for a good feed. Hence they have bugger all muscle tissue.

That is why grain fed Beef is so tender. They get stuck in pens, fed and fattened and can't build muscle.

Even better is King Island Beef. Lots of good salty grass, no need to wander around in search of a feed. Great flavour, better than grain fed, equally as tender.

The slaughtering process at King Island or feed lots is similar, they get killed on site. No bundling them into a truck to tense them up.

My only aim was ever to satisfy guests in my Restaurant. I succeeded by buying the best available meat. Then cooked it properly.

It worked.

Cheers,

Jim.

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FollowupID: 626529

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 20:46

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 20:46
I must agree on the effect of stress on the quality of the beef. We previously had a small cattle property in Victoria. We killed our own beef during that time. The very best beef we had was when we killed a young steer in the paddock. They wer pretty tame and I would call the herd up with a handful of lucerne. The lucky steer would be dropped while chewing on lucerne from my hand.

The cattle were Galloways, a smallish Scottish breed. Raised on excellent land, killed this way, then hung for about 14 days, resulted in the most divine beef I have ever tasted.

Norm C
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FollowupID: 626549

Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 21:05

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 21:05
Norm,

Can I come to tea?

You know how to breed it, kill it and cook it.

I'd like mine very rare, with a glass of Red. I'll trust your choice on the plonk. You're a discerning man.

Regards,

Jim.

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FollowupID: 626558

Follow Up By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 21:20

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 21:20
Yes Jim, you can come for Tea, but I must warn you, life has changed.

Being a Queenslander, even the wonders of such great beef was not enough to keep me in Victoria (it would be a great place if it was 2,000 KM further North). We sold that property about 6 years ago and returned to Queensland.

Even worse (from a quality beef point of view anyway), we are now 'on the road' full time, so can't even rely on the local butcher we came to know and trust.

On the plus side, living 'on the road' and touring this great country, has it's compensations. Fresh caught fish, crabs and prawns are not a bad replacement at time, but a man still needs good beef occasionally to survive.

Norm C

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FollowupID: 626561

Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Apr 07, 2009 at 00:33

Tuesday, Apr 07, 2009 at 00:33
sorry about the science but after training as a food technologist the "why" really interested me

"hanging" has alot of science behind it - of course you dont need to know it any more than a motorist needs to know how a car works
but it can explain when things go wrong.

everyone knows you dont chase the cow round the padock for 1/2 an hour before killing it but this is the "why"
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FollowupID: 626592

Reply By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 18:19

Monday, Apr 06, 2009 at 18:19
Not quite, but as you say almost.
Stress usually occurs before death, I have yet to see a stressed bit of dead meat when it is gutted.
Bit like Oh We don't eat animals , we buy all our meat / dog/cat food at the Supermarket.
Yeah Right.
Time to change the subject.
What is the correct/best way to make a good billy tea.
AnswerID: 358417

Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Apr 07, 2009 at 00:37

Tuesday, Apr 07, 2009 at 00:37
sorry i must be misundersttod the stress can ocur pre mortem which lowers blood sugar
the lactic acid formation from these blood sugars occurs post mortem during "hanging" and is essential for a quality end product
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FollowupID: 626593

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