Mobile phone emergency use.

Submitted: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 17:40
ThreadID: 69204 Views:3770 Replies:9 FollowUps:7
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Apologies if this has been done before. I was told at a security training course that dialling 112 anywhere in the world would connect to emergency services. This was a satellite connection, hence would work, for example, in the Simpson - or anywhere else in Oz for that matter.
Can any informed gurus confirm or deny?

Thanks, John.
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Reply By: saltwatertrekker - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 17:49

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 17:49
ve tried it doesnt work , i called telstra about it and 3 people said it works and 6 said it didnt , epirb or sat phone the go but dont use globalstar as they dont even have reception anywhere
AnswerID: 366832

Follow Up By: reddust - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 19:48

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 19:48
Hello swt, I think you need to get your facts straight regarding Globalstar, I & my friends have phones on this service & can't complain about it's coverage! If you think it's like city coverage - think again, as you have to wait (with any sat coverage) until a satellite is in range, you can print out from Globalstar (pivotel) the ideal times to make your calls, (if you can't wait for a signal) I would like to see you put your statement in writing & send it to the telephone ombudsman stating your claim & ask them to close Globalstar down! as they "don't even have reception anywhere!" interesting! I understand Globalstar own Vodaphone as well, regards, dusty
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Follow Up By: saltwatertrekker - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 20:06

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 20:06
hi dusty , im an explorer and we used to use them for about a month and they never worked, we would get about 5 seconds out of them then they would drop out and when your in the middle of no where 5 days from the nearest farm station we were not impressed, aparently globalstar lost one of its satelites so they said so we switch to uridium and had no dramas, as for the city coverage i was told this by another user, we ended sending all 5 globalstar phones back and got a full refund and a letter stating they were having problems, maybe they fixed it up, lucky for me im a bushman and know how to survive out in the desert, i didnt mean to offend mate , was just relaying my experience, can i ask with uridium you dont need to wait for reception ever so what time of the day or nite can you use globalstar and what if its an emergency , the 112 number , isnt that a telstra thing on mobile phones ?
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 20:12

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 20:12
No use notifying the ombudsman as he or she is more then likely sick and tiered of the other thousands of people who have been stung by Globalstar and have already lodged a complaint.

What a joke waiting for coverage before you can make a call "Hang on guys I'll have coverage in 7 minutes and we can only talk for 9 minutes until the satellite drops out".

I get better coverage with my sat phone then I do on NextG so yes I would expect better coverage then I get in the city.

Emergencies don't wait!

If I was on Globalstar I would be more then happy to lodge a complaint.
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Follow Up By: The Top End Explorer - Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 18:29

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 18:29
I posted this last year.

Pivotel

As I am to understand from my last first aid course, the 112 # will be fazed out in the near future, this is second hand info.

Cheers Steve.
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Reply By: Time - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:01

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:01
Another Urban legend, have a look here.
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Reply By: howesy - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:02

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:02
It works as a universal number that will supposedly pick up any available carrier for the call but it relies on a signal of some provider being present.
AnswerID: 366836

Reply By: Bushwhacker - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:10

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:10
Hi John F,
I have been told the same thing, but only if there is reception around. Not sure about a sat phone, but normal mobile with any reception (even if its not your own network) is SUPPOSED to connect via 112 to emergency number in any country. The way it was explained to me is, if I have no reception with my Optus mobile phone, but Telstra reception is in the area, Telstra will take the call....112 is an international code rather than having the 000, 911, 999 etc. Last place I heard this said was during a St. John Ambulance first aid course. Never tried it, so just going on what I was told, but from a reliable source.'Whacker
AnswerID: 366838

Reply By: George_M - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:38

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:38
I understand that 112 works globally if you're in range of any carriers' GSM service, and your handset can communicate on the available frequencies. For example, if you had a Telstra or Optus GSM service, you could not get a 112 connection in the Simpson as neither carrier has a GSM network operating in that area. An Iridium service would operate in the Simpson, but your Telstra/Optus GSM handset does not operate on the Iridium frequency.
Come any closer and I'll rip your throat out!

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AnswerID: 366845

Reply By: equinox - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:43

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 18:43
More info:

http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_100575

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Follow Up By: Member - John F (NSW) - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:02

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:02
Thanks everyone. Thanks for that link, Equinox. Our course providers need to get their facts straight.

Regards, John.
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Reply By: StormyKnight - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:13

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:13
Often in the High Country (Victoria) my Telstra mobile will say "Emegency Service Only" or words to that effect. Basically means that at that location I was not in range of a Telstra tower, but in range of another provider. The only number I could call would be 000 or perhaps 112.

Cheers

AnswerID: 366870

Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 07:54

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 07:54
"dialling 112 anywhere in the world would connect to emergency services. This was a satellite connection, hence would work, for example, in the Simpson - or anywhere else in Oz for that matter. "

Hopefully you will get back to them immediately and make it clear that this type of misinformation could lead to a fatality. This misinformation would make someone believe that they don't need to take a Satphone or an EPIRB, because an "expert" told them that any Mobile Phone would work anywhere in Australia to make an emergency call to 000.
AnswerID: 366914

Reply By: RobAck - Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 17:39

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 17:39
Some interesting commentary and it points to the need to consider not only the informaton on international websites but what happens in Australia.

Firstly the information from your course is incorrect. The Australian Communications Authority is the source of factual information in this country and the link is this http://www.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_100575

Non satellite phones
The 112 code is used where your service provider has no service but another one does and you are actually in range. This code allows you direct access the 000 service regardless so is in fact a bypass code.So that means categorically that if you are in the Simpson desert you will have no mobile phone coverage so that option will not work.

Global roaming. If you take your mobile overseas your carrier needs to have a global roaming agreement with a carrier in the country(s) you are travelling in to even give you coverage. As well some Australian mobile phones need a different SIM to work OS, depends on the country, carrier etc. Best bet is to buy a pay as you go in country we find but this again depends on need

Satphone. Also understand that satphones don't work globally either as we have found on several occassions. You need to discuss global roaming with your satphone service provider which generally surprises a lot of people.

So take a satphone when travelling out of mobile phone range and trust me you will be very surprised how often you are out of range, particularly if you are travelling in South Australia, NT, WA and Qld

Regards

RobA
AnswerID: 367014

Follow Up By: Member - Dick (Int) - Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 18:51

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 18:51
Our Iridium Satphones, both aircraft mounted and handhelds have worked anywhere we have ever been in the world, we have never had roaming issue's. We use SatCom direct as our Iridium Service Provider.

We have never experienced an out of range situation with an Iridiam phone provided it has a clear view of the sky.



Cheers
Dick







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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 19:10

Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 19:10
Iridium satphones using an International SIM work anywhere in the world (except near the poles) because the voice is relayed globally via other satellites. An Iridium call from a Satphone in Australia to a fixed phone in Australia is relayed from a satellite over Australia, via other Iridium satellites to Arizona USA, then via the cable network back to Australia !

Iridium satphones using a Telstra Mobile phone SIM (04xx xxx xxx) only work in Australia. They're still routed via America, but the service is defined to only be available from Australia.

Other satphones will only work in specific service areas in the world.
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