Electronic Maps - What's the most useful ?

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:10
ThreadID: 69868 Views:2704 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
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I currently use Nat Raster 2005 - am thinking of upgrading to Nat Raster 2008 ? - This is for a Laptop and OziExplorer use ...

Is there anything better for the money ?

Checked out the shop (here ) and nothing jumps out at me for Australia coverage generally ...

So what do you guys an gals use ? or do you get a map for the area
that you are heading into ?

Cheers

Steve

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Reply By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:18

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:18
Think you'll find that the 2008 version still has the same maps as the 2005 version. Not much money spent on mapping these days :-(
AnswerID: 370304

Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:47

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:47
Was pondering the same question this morning as my Raster series is out-dated and there have been new additions of other digital maps I have.

Found this.

Hema 4wd DVD Map

Cheers
AnswerID: 370310

Follow Up By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:51

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:51
Yip I have this one and have been happy with the detail of these maps
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:54

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 13:54
Thanks, that will help seal my choice as it has everything I need.

Cheers...
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Follow Up By: Richard W (NSW) - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 07:54

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 07:54
Another vote for the Hema DVD. It also has the Geoscience 1:250,000K set for Autralia on it as well.
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Reply By: Member - AJB (VIC) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 17:34

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 17:34
I reckon Raster is rubbish! Topo is better and even my street navigation is better than Raster as I am surprised at the amount of bush tracks and minor outback roads it has on it.
I always have a paper map of the area, well actually it is all of Australia, so use the electronic mapping as a gadget and something to pass the time. Occasionally I need it to find something (like a Pizza shop in Wagga for instance) or to see exactly where I am in an unfamiliar area if I care.
The trick is to have several mapping options, (Topo, Raster, Street, etc) on the one SD card so switching between is easy and quick if neccessary.
AnswerID: 370351

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 18:46

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 18:46
Topo! Which Topo are you referring to?

Personaly, I have found Natmap Raster to contain everything I need.
When comparing it to the hard copy Hema Maps I have in spiral book form, they are both very similar.

Street Navigation has nowhere near the detail that Natmap Raster, or Hema has when you are in more remote areas, or even many closer country areas.

I agree with your last comment that more than one mapping option is a good idea.
Perhaps different areas of Oz are covered in more detail on some maps than others.

I also have Hema Great Desert Tracks which give a little more detail sometimes, but generally, I'm happy with the Natmap series.

Bill.
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Follow Up By: Member - AJB (VIC) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 20:54

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 20:54
i'd have to go out to the car and have a look at the SD but I think it is V2.27 I also have Hema in spiral bound and individual sheets and Raster is similar but I reckon the Topo is not as "Gumby". But that is a personal opinion. I flick between what software I want to run and after about 5 minutes of watching it I start thinking about other things and therefore only glance at it occasionally. See I also reckon that we are only living on an island and eventually we'll get to the beach! I kind of know where I am going, well in the travelling sense maybe not in life direction, so the GPS and mapping software is an accessory not a manditory item.
In any case, the ability to read paper maps is far more important than what mapping software we use. The ability to have simple co-ordinates and place these on the paper map in front of you is what we need to be able to do along with the knowledge of NSEW!
All the gadgets I have are great fun but if I didn't have them I could still get by. I did in the 80's and 90's!
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Follow Up By: bgreeni - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:26

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:26
I am not sure what you mean.

Basically there are 2 types of mapping data - Raster and vector.

Systems such as OziExplorer use raster, many gps receivers with built in mapping use vector as do most GIS systems (Though they can also uses raster data).

Neither system is intrinsically more accurate, that depends on the mapping data used to create the maps.

The 1:250k geoscience maps are just one source of raster maps (If you look at the web site you can also download vector versions - I regularly use this data to produce my own maps with a GIS. This data is still however 1:250k accurate.

I also have lots of 1:100k and 1:50k raster maps - better for more detailed work but not so good for driving as they have too much detail.

Finally you can use photo type data - either air photos or satellite. Again at different scales and accuracy, but really just another form of raster data.
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Reply By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 22:44

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 22:44
I use an old 2002 version of the 1:250k Natmap series and its usually fine for remote area work. The main problem is that a lot of tracks that are marked now don't exist, if they ever did. They are highly accurate for topo detail however.

Geoscience Aust is also looking to shortly release (source; personal communications) the entire stock of 1:100k topo series.

The product will be released as georeferenced 4 mosaics covering Australia. The central area where there are only map compilations at scale of 1:100K will be replaced with the 250K raster map information for greater accuracy.

Cheers.

AnswerID: 370431

Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 22:57

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 22:57
Hi John,

I'm not sure what you mean about the central area 100K maps.

Are the central areas being released on CD?

I am aware the 100k:1 maps exist, but have not yet been published though available at special request as line drawings.

If they are being released, that would be great!!

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:07

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:07
Hi Alan, sadly no.

What I meant was that the central areas weren't ever formed into proper maps from the data.

The 1:100k sheets cover about all of Oz except the centre. In these areas the mosaic will default to the current 1:250k series sheets.

Even so, I'll be getting a set. Most of my 4wd'ing is in areas other than the centre. Will only cost about $100 for all of Oz I believe,

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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:11

Tuesday, Jun 16, 2009 at 23:11
No worries John,

The 100's have an extra contour here, sandridge there...I can make do with the 250's for a while longer :))

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 07:30

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 07:30
Hi John

Alan you beat me to asking the same question.

John when the new 1:100K' series comes out would you mind posting the info. I would be keen to get a copy. I'm always on the lookout to add to my electronic mapping arsenal.

cheers
Phil

PS I really enjoyed your article in the latest Western 4WD - great bit of country that!
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:18

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:18
Hi Phil, thx for the feedback.

Yes, I'll be letting everyone know when the product comes out. Mind you it's been coming for a long time - when I first made inquiries in May last year the prospective release was for July 2008.

Keeps drifting for various techie improvement reasons.

Cheers.
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Reply By: paulnsw - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 09:32

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 09:32
some significant improvements in 2008 1:250k. You can download updated tiles since then free. I would pay the money for the improvements and in layout.
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Reply By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 09:20

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 09:20
I'm still confused. I have yet to decide between DVD Hema or Natmaps. Hema obviously more expensive. Is it worth it? I'll be using them on a Moov 360, which has a 4.3 screen.
Questions. Whch set of maps are likely to be the easiest to read? Can I download just a section of the maps I need? I will be storing them on 2G Sd cards and I doubt that the maps can be all stored on one card, so, how much space do they take up on a card or can I spread them across several cards. Or should I abandon the Mio Moov and just get a netbook?
The Hema GPS is a Mio Moov in disguise so I would think it might be possible to load the Hema maps into the unit, or preferably, SD cards.
Thank you GPS gurus
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