Nissan wheels falling off

Submitted: Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 18:30
ThreadID: 7433 Views:1725 Replies:10 FollowUps:9
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Has anyone had the unnerving experiance of having the wheel studs shear compleatly off on their nissan patrol whist travelling along. I have gone through this on 1 occasion and now a friend of mine has just had it happen to him as well.
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Reply By: GLAYVA MAN(bendigo) - Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 18:56

Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 18:56
gday goona.
in 99.9% of cases the wheels havnt been done up tight to begin with.
had a guy in on sat 2 wheel studs sheared of other 4 3/4 worn throu.
just had his mechanic check the brakes landcruiserjamieson wild cat
AnswerID: 32015

Follow Up By: David N. - Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 19:40

Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 19:40
Yep,
Can happen to any vehicle..... or trailer.
Surprisingly common, in fact!
Happened to a friend's Falcon a few years ago.... and I can't tell a lie.... to MY trailer about twenty something years ago.
I'd say in more like about 99.99999999% of cases the wheel nuts have done too tight... or too loose! Sad fact of life!
Avoid tightening with "rattle guns" and do it with a good wheel brace (or even a torque wrench- but very few people would bother with that!)
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FollowupID: 22848

Follow Up By: Willie - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 08:24

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 08:24
G'day GLAYVA MAN,

I have seen a cat like yours out in the Gibson Desert a few years back. Maybe it has family out there. :-))

Yeah, I have busted a few wheel studs on my old Patrol when it came into my possession but it is no big deal. I found that the previous owner had fitted the wrong wheel nuts. Also happened on a caravan when the u-bolt gave way. That was fun changing studs on the side of the road halfway between the Isa and Cloncurry.

Cheers,
Willie
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22876

Reply By: kezza - Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 19:50

Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 19:50
Ive never been that drunk when changing my tyres

sorry cant help

kes
AnswerID: 32021

Follow Up By: Hellbelly - Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 22:28

Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 22:28
I had that problem with the first car I ever owned. It was an old HQ and I did those suckers up tight as I could. Then while driving along I would regulally hear them ping off. Now I do them up tight then check them after 50 K's or so. Dont do them up too tight.
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FollowupID: 22859

Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 20:29

Thursday, Sep 25, 2003 at 20:29
Goona,
Never had it happen to my Patrol but as metioned by others it all has to do with the torque of the bolts, plus I suspect a certain amount of shock loading from rattle guns.
Something to be aware of is the expansion and contraction of the hub where the wheel nuts / studs are as the hub itself absorbs the heat from the bearing and more so the heat generated by the braking everything expands and contracts, one of the reasons why alloy wheels have a different torque to steel wheels, plus thickness and a whole heap of other "stuff". Alloys typically around the 133 nm mark I think steels are a tad diffrent. A guy called Diamond maybe able to tell you the exact figures.
I went to a tyre house a while back, the guy turned up with a torque wrench to tighten the wheel nuts up something I didn't expect at all. Since then I've always used this tyre house, it's the samll things that count. Ardross Tyres for those in Perth, if you're interested. Keep the shiny side up
AnswerID: 32025

Follow Up By: Hilly - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 20:32

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 20:32
Seems to me I've watched you flog up some nuts with a dirty great big hammer Marty.... and with fuel everywhere at the time if memory serves correct..... ;-)
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Follow Up By: Hilly - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 20:36

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 20:36
Oh, that's right.... It was on a leaking heat exchanger... slightly different matter I suppose.
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Follow Up By: Martyn (WA) - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 22:28

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 22:28
Dearest Hilly,
You could say that, the exchanger doesn't have the same thermo cycling characteristics as a brake disc, cum'on give me a brake. And just to let you know I did ask about that, the torquing of the bolts that is, from there the "dirty big" hammer came into the fro, nuff said. Yes I did bite didn't I............ Keep the shiny side up
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FollowupID: 22943

Follow Up By: Hilly - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 23:05

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 23:05
I knew I could count on you, Marty. I tell ya, if you were a fish, you'd be extinct by now.

I promise to be nice from now on..... for a while......
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FollowupID: 22946

Follow Up By: Martyn (WA) - Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 21:15

Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 21:15
Maybe you can take the hook out next week........... Bait was good but.Keep the shiny side up
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FollowupID: 22983

Reply By: Algee - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 08:33

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 08:33
This may be of some assistance to you. I have a 80 series Cruiser that did the same thing twice. What was found in the end was that the nuts were the incorrect ones for the wheels. The vehicle has after market mags on it with the standard steel rim wheel nut. The nut was not going all the way in against the hub when tightened. This was putting starin on the thread left bare btwn the back of rim and hub. I had some long stemmed nuts machined down to the right size and the problem has not reocurred. I can feel very sorry for you. I lost to front ones at different times and it is very bloody scary especially on the Sydney to Newcastle freeway at 110kmh.
AnswerID: 32058

Reply By: GUPatrol - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:12

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:12
When tyre shops tighten them up (even by hand) they do them up too tight, that causes the studs to stretch, once they have been stretched they sheer as the hub temperature raises.
AnswerID: 32067

Reply By: Big Trev - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:25

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:25
I have had a Ford Patrol / Nissan Maverick for 11 years, and never had a problem. The idea that the wheel nuts not being done up tight enough is very feasible.
AnswerID: 32071

Reply By: Nicko - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:38

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:38
yeah we lost a caravan wheel near flinder rangers in SA. Slowed down and saw it overtake us into the bush!

Spent 1 hour trying to find it! Had to do the emu search.

Moral of the story: Tighten those nuts!
AnswerID: 32072

Reply By: Andrew - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:45

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 10:45
Wheel studs break because they have been overtightened. Overtightening causes the metal to go past its elastic limit (ie it stretches) Once it has stretched it no longer has the same strength which means that the next time they are done up they are likely to stretch even more. Then while you are driving down the road, the forces applied by cornering etc overload the weakened stud and it breaks.
Once one breaks, its load is carried by the next ones which overlaods them. That is why you will hear of people continually breaking studs.

Overtightening causes looseness

The cure

Once you have broken a stud, you need to replace the full set when you can.

Prevention.

Never let anyone tighten your wheelnuts with a rattle gun. The typical rattle gun is capable of applying twice as much torque as the stud is designed to handle.
Do the final tightening with a torque wrench.
If you don't have a torque wrench, work with a friend who has one until you know how hard to lean on your wheelbrace to achieve the same result.
The practice time is better spent than roadside repairs and possible accidents.

regards

AnswerID: 32073

Follow Up By: Alan H - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 12:01

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 12:01
A mate of mines Troopy has had that happen a couple of times so I'll pass this info on to him.
I had it happen once when a front wheel from a Bedford Dormobile overtook me going down a steel hill in the UK!
I didn't even fully realise it was one of mine until I stopped in panic and the vehicle dropped down with a bang on to the nearside front brake drum.
But that was caused by a slack mechanic not doing them up at all in the first place.
His career with that company ended abruptly!
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FollowupID: 22885

Reply By: Member -BJ (Sydney) - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 18:23

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 18:23
Think it's bad on your patrol had it happen on one of my trucks ( 8 Wheeler) very scary when loaded. Wheel nuts came loose & movement of wheel on hub sheares of studs so check regularly. Regards Bob
Where to next
AnswerID: 32134

Reply By: CAMEL - Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 22:07

Friday, Sep 26, 2003 at 22:07
Yes once, then a coule of months later doing a tyre rotation sheared one of the studs and could visibly see rust & on removing the other studs, found 3 more with visible fractures so it's only time the same would have occured to that wheel.
Concensus was metal fatige probably through use of rattle guns being a main factor.
AnswerID: 32147

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