UHF Radio Use

This is designed as an observation (not a rant I hope).

Now many of us "explorers" enjoy the use of UHF whilst out and about. It makes travelling in convoy much easier (and fun). It can aid some serious and sticky situations when no mobile phone coverage.

BUT ....

Please consider that you're not the only person or group in the country on that particular channel! Most Saturday's and Sunday's I have to ask UHF users to mind their language and 9 times out of 10 I get told where to stick it!

Each to their own you might say but when we're a busy working farm with 15+ people working in 20+ vehicles and 10+ houses it's not practical for us to change channel and neither is it possible for us to turn the radio off so that my children don't get an education on what Jonny Boy's arse looks like out the back of the troopy!

During the week we get a fair bit of truckie chat too but as they're generally doing 110 kph on the bitumen they are not around long enough to be too much of a nuisance.

Rant over!
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 09:55

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 09:55
Its a pain allright , but we just use CTCSS and over years have only brought radios with it and it really helps enormously.
Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: D200Dug- Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:13

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:13
I fully agree it is sad that so many people have so little regard for others.

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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:18

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:18
It is Citizens Band Radio and is available to everyone to use and is not supposed to be used for commercial purposes ie: running a business which is what you are doing. It is in fact illegal to do so.
While many do use it for commercial purposes (and get away with it) anyone using the service cannot expect a channel to be available for their exclusive use.
Yes you may be using a particular channel for many years but they also may have been using a particular channel for many years as well and only travelling through your area.
A case in point, our local 4wd club uses channel 27, has done for years.
One of our closest available areas to enjoy is also close to a regional centre and as the area involved is mountainous and above the regional centre our transmissions do carry a fair way.
In this regional centre there is a company using channel 27 to run a business and we constantly get threats from him telling us to get off HIS channel as he is using it for his business. As he has done this for a few years someone eventually reported him to the authorities.
we use this channel quite often when on extended trips and often get asked when passing through if we could mind changing channel as often cockies etc are using it to coordinate staff on properties. We usually change or if on 100k on the highway just shut up until out of range.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Follow Up By: jothefw - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:33

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:33
"as often cockies etc are using it to coordinate staff"

Well thanks for putting us in our place.



I don't think my point was exclusive use of a channel more consider the fact that you're not the only users.

I don't expect anyone to use foul language or tell explicit jokes whilst using UHF. End of point. Have understanding for all users.
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Follow Up By: fugwurgin - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:51

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:51
ozhumvee
you are quite correct in defining CB as Citizens Band, it is available to everyone!
I don't think the OP was expecting "exclusive use" of his channel, merely pointing out the use of foul language and how that affects other users particularly those with kids who prefer to not expose them to such inappropriate comments often heard over the "citizens band" radio.
I guess as you have pointed out it is a public use medium, those who do use it should consider the other users. i can not go down the main street or to the local shopping centre and swear out my car window for everone to hear, not only is that illegal but just downright stupid.
The property could not be made to refrain from using the cb nor could they be fined for doing so despite you claimg it to be "illegal" if it was a lot of local councils would be in strife. in many cases it is the most effective way to communicate, and yes they will need to expect other users to transmit on the same channel from time to time, this is where ctss??? comes in and would be effective (for everyone concerned).
personally i hate when i hear idiots on the cb talk rubbish especially when my 2 year old can hear, i know i have the option to turn it off, but it is citizens band after all and i shouldnt have to!
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Reply By: Rob! - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:30

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:30
It would be like telling the blokes at the pub to watch their language.
As was mentioned above, the language is unfortunate but what you are doing is also not right so the best you can do is to put up with it.

R.
AnswerID: 419361

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 18:33

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 18:33
Would the 'blokes in a pub' go home & talk that way to their young children?

I think it is not legal to use foul language in any 2 way transmissions, before anybody jumps down my throat, I said "I think".
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Follow Up By: D200Dug- Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 23:00

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 23:00
I think :-) it is actually illegal to use foul language over any telecommunications in Australia.

I know it is actually illegal to swear or use threatening language over a phone of any kind so I would imagine radios would come under the same act .

The problem lies in identifying and charging the offender, like people who make false mayday calls they are very difficult to trace and legally confirm.
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Follow Up By: Rob! - Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 09:46

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 09:46
Let me explain my position on this.

I think foul language is very unfortunate and says a lot about the people who use it. A lot of them seem to use it like a comma and to compensate for their lack vocabular. That's why I rarely turn on the UHF.

I doubt it is illigal to use foul language in communications (threatening landuage is a different thing). It is in most cases not iilegal to swear at a police officer, and how many movies are there without any swearing these days. But I am happy to be pointed to the legislation that proves me wrong.

And as I said, You would have better chances of stopping blokes swearing in a pub than you would over the UHF.

R
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:39

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:39
This is an extract from an Australian Government manual:

4.13 TRANSMISSION PRINCIPLES
Radio communications are multi-user facilities and require adherence to a
number of basic principles when transmitting as follows:
a. Listen before transmitting.
b. Keep messages short and concise.
c. Urgent or priority messages must be transmitted expediently, without
dramatisation.
d. Unusual person or place names may be spelt by using the phonetic
alphabet.
e. Long messages should be broken into natural sentences.
f. If messages are required to be written by the receiving operator, the
message should be transmitted at writing speed.
g. Avoid the use of jargon terms.
h. Do not use profane language on radio networks, they are not permitted
by law.

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Follow Up By: Rob! - Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:44

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:44
Excellent. Now we're getting somewhere. Do you know which law?
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Follow Up By: D200Dug- Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:54

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 10:54
It is also illegal to swear at a police officer.

I know a few people who have ended up in the blue taxi for doing just that.
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Follow Up By: Rob! - Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 11:00

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 11:00
Ok. I've done the research and you are correct.
...because according to a magistrate, calling somebody a "pr1ck" is not swearing
brisbane tabloid
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Follow Up By: SDG - Saturday, Jun 05, 2010 at 19:55

Saturday, Jun 05, 2010 at 19:55
The Loaded Dog Hotel in Tarago is a family friendly hotel. Caught swearing there you get warned. Caught swearing again you get evicted.
Seen that happen a couple of times.
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Reply By: jothefw - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:42

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 10:42
Info from various websites - all of which state the same .....

Citizen band radio service
The Citizen Band Radio Service (CBRS) is a two-way, short distance, communications service that can be used by any person in Australia, whether it is for recreational or domestic purposes, or in connection with work or business.

The service may be used for:

any form of voice communications activity, including those activities related to voice communications (ie selective calling); and
telemetry and telecommand applications.
CBRS repeater stations, however, need specific frequency assignments and are licensed individually under apparatus licensing arrangements and are subject to licence fees.


So we are not using illegally.

And I don't take my kids into the pub when there's bad language - they're sat at the kitchen table doing their homework whilst I work from home.
AnswerID: 419363

Follow Up By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:16

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:16
Well in 2016 there will be 76 channels to chose and in some cases abuse from.

ACMA changes to UHF CB

The ACMA have recognised that ther is congestion on the current 38 channels and from January 2011 the changes start, taking 5 years to complete.
The major changes will be repeater stations. The current 40 ch CB will be operational until the 2016 end date.
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Follow Up By: fugwurgin - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:21

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:21
i have dibbs on ch 60 & 62. so no one use them ok, they're mine! lol
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:50

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:50
Just to clear it up Jo - it is not illegal.
Words from the class license are below which specifically refer to "Company"

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The service operates in two distinct frequency bands-the high frequency (HF) band (26.965 – 27.405 MHz) and the ultra high frequency (UHF) band (476.425 – 477.400 MHz). The service is for public access and is available to everyone. If a company chooses to use the service for business, they have no rights of exclusivity and must accept other users on the same channel.
Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:51

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:51
when it was first set up with the 27Mhz radios it was not allowed to be used for business use and I apologise for the incorrect info re UHF.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Follow Up By: Member - Longtooth (SA) - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 20:34

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 20:34
A couple of years ago our group was told in no uncertain terms whilst in the vicinity of Laverton, WA, to "Get off this channel - it is a mining channel". A short explanation of the facts received no reply but we changed anyway. A simple request would have been a little more civilised than the "demands" to vacate the channel.
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Follow Up By: Flynnie - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 21:24

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 21:24
Longtooth

I can see that you would be a bit upset at that if it just came out of the blue without warning. But if on the other hand you had noticed a mining company using the channel it would have been reasonably expected that your group would change to another channel. There is no great shortage of channels that can normally be used. A group can have a main channel and a fall-back channel for use in such situations.

Correct me if I am wrong but I would expect one or two of 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 & 39 could be used by a group without causing dramas to anyone.

It is sometimes better to duck and weave than to try and fight it out.

Flynnie
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Reply By: Member - Ruth D (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:31

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 11:31
Jothefw, thank you for your Post - like you, I find it extremely annoying and distasteful at times to have to "put up" with what happens on UHF, particularly if I am trying to find out information on the flow of traffic (if I'm on the east coast and wanting to use the Gateway - notorious for accidents) - the replies are truly disgusting in most cases and I wait and ask again - eventually a 'normal' person will get a sensible reply back to me.
As for using the UHF for "business" we do also.
As for the tone of the replies on EO - I am somewhat taken aback today - there is absolutely nothing wrong in asking those using a certain channel to desist or limit - I do, and ask nicely.
I also don't think you had a 'rant' - if so, I must have them frequently. I have over the years on EO written exactly what you have asked above. Please do not be put off by "explorers" not minding their manners here.
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 15:25

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 15:25
I travel with my UHF always on and like others at times have found that there are those that use foul language which I do not like or want to hear and at these times will often either switch channels or turn the radio off.
When visiting cities like Mel and Syd one hears someone ranting on and on which is a bit pointless to me.
I have when out back heard land holders on the radio and will say Gidday then will get my group to drop down or up a channel. We find that it is a simple and courteous thing to do. Sometimes the other party wants to chat and we oblige.
As usual there are those that spoil it for others.

Hear you all on the Radio Sometime.

I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Reply By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 15:54

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 15:54
Jothefw,

Another thank you for your Post

We only have the radio on when "in convoy" which does not happen too often.

We just got sick and tired of the foul language. But that is the nature of the beast.

The radio is there if we need it.

Phil
AnswerID: 419396

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:10

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:10
Hi Jothefw,

No it wasn't a rant - you make a perfectly valid point and I am surprised by some of the responses here. It is quite unnecessary for people to use some of the language that is all too often heard on our radios.

Or maybe we should feel sorry for those who have such a limited vocabulary and who have such trouble getting their thoughts out without every second word (literally) beginning with "f"!

I really cant see why its so difficult when on a public channel to keep the language within reasonable limits - nobody expects saints.

Another annoyance is those users who tie up channels playing music or letting the kids chat endlessley about nothing in particular - its not a mobile phone.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

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Reply By: Maîneÿ . . .- Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:50

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 16:50
Just a thought that could be a tad off topic, but this thread has some very knowledgeable contributors to it


Is there a way I can use my VHF marine radio to contact a UHF CB ??

When used expressly in a convoy situation, I know they are different bands.

Yes, obviously I've never even turned mine on.

Maîneÿ . . .
AnswerID: 419403

Follow Up By: Andrew & Jen - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 17:21

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 17:21
Mainey
I think the short answer is no.
Marine band VHF is not a citizens band radio.
Many frequencies are allocated to and used commercially by shipping and these are shared around the world.
As you know, an operator on marine VHF must hold a licence (or this used to be the case) and nominate location of fixed radios (what boat they are on) and hand helds are only to be used in conjunction with that boat or ancillary craft (ie tender)
Anti-social behaviour is not tolerated and anyone mis-using, particularly the repeator frequencies, can expect a sharp reminder from the CG. The worst offenders are commercial fishers - if they cut out the profanities, it would reduce transmit time by around 60% :-)
Wrt foul language on UHF, it is interesting to hear truckies admonish those who are OTT - they soon get the message!
It would be good if there was a bit of radio discipline generally - identifier, short transmit (to the point) and response (with identifier). This would help greatly where there are multiple users on one channel. But I won't be holding my breath!
Andrew
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 18:36

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 18:36
Jothefw,

If you lived in the metropolitan area of any city in Australia, you would find foul language and other stupid antics abound to the point that CB radio use is pointless.

The lack of any intelligent mentality whatsoever, let alone courtesy, is the "norm" in suburbia.

We often have scanning on when driving in the country and pick up some interesting conversations from farm based people as we pass. We never join in but simply listen as a form of entertainment to the business of working the farm and organising lunch, or some such thing. All good stuff.


Bill.

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

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Reply By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 19:48

Thursday, Jun 03, 2010 at 19:48
I think we have two separate issues here.
Firstly having to put up with the antics of the intellectual midgets with the mental capacity of your common garden cockroach. These are easily identified by the liberal sprinkling of profanities that infest their version of the English language. As distasteful as listening to these cretins is we do have the option of reducing the volume or turning the set off completely. I personally leave mine on when well clear of the city limits and generally tuned to the truckies channel. When approaching a town and this is mostly where the colourful language starts, I turn it off or right down.
The other issue as I see it anyway is that CB radio is just that, there for the use of all citizens (unfortunately the abovementioned morons included) and just like our roads, parking areas, shopping centres and whatever we are just going to have to learn to share. This includes farmers, truckies and us average Joes and Jills going about our business or leisure activities.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: _gmd_pps - Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 12:00

Friday, Jun 04, 2010 at 12:00
"Firstly having to put up with the antics of the intellectual midgets with the mental capacity of your common garden cockroach."

which describes perfectly the 90% of Australians.

They do it because they are cowards.. CB is anonymous and thats why they
dare. If they would have to use a callsign they would not do it even if
they talk like this every day to their kids. CB should be licensed like VHF
on marine radio using vehicle registrations as call signs.

And I also agree that commercial users should get their own frequencies.
Australia had the longest standing ham organisation and radio was and still is
essential for some. It really amazes me that there are no cheaper "special"
frequencies for the farms.

have fun
gmd
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Reply By: Pete Jackman (SA) - Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 13:28

Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 13:28
If I am travelling in convoy I use the CTCSS on my GME. Then only transmissions preceded by the tone get through. This may already be fitted to your radios.

Cheers

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

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Follow Up By: Andrew & Jen - Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 13:43

Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 13:43
Hullo Pete
I am not familiar with CTCSS
If only transmissions preceded by the tone get through to you, how do you know that you are not cutting across someone else already transmitting on that channel when you want to transmit?
Rgds
Andrew
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Follow Up By: Pete Jackman (SA) - Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 14:48

Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 14:48
I don't know the answer to that but it woud be possible.

Wiki has some info:

[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_Tone-Coded_Squelch_System]CTCSS[/url

Regards

Pete
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Follow Up By: dusty99 - Tuesday, Jun 22, 2010 at 18:05

Tuesday, Jun 22, 2010 at 18:05
If you use ctcss you should have on your radio a "Busy radio lockout" mode it may be called a different name. what is does it tells you that some one not on your ctcss setting is talking you cannot hear them you just wait until the cannel is free to speak. You shouldn't use ctcss or dcs without busy lock out
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Reply By: Fatso - Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 20:56

Monday, Jun 07, 2010 at 20:56
I have used UHF radios for 25 years in my line of work in taxis.
It has in that time always been illegal to swear on the radio.
The company owns several frequency licenses & it is illegal for anyone to transmit on one of their frequencies.
It is not illegal for any body to listen in on transmissions on these frequencies. Only to transmit.
These frequencies are not on CB radios.
I also have a mate that owns a trawler who owns an HF frequency license he uses to communicate with his wife. Same thing occurs there. Anyone can listen in on his frequency but it is illegal for them to transmit.
People have used the company's frequency from time to time, but not for long. If they persist they are reported to the relavent Federal Department.
I think a parachute company was prosecuted some years back for doing so.
I don't know how they came to have radios with the taxi company's frequency on them. The handsets probably came from another district outside our broadcast range.

AS for the swearing. It is horrible in larger centres. I turn my CB off until I am well out of town unless I am on the Bruce Highway. Too many foul mouthed users there too.
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