UHF

Does anyone advise to have a UHF for outback driving?

Thanks

Sarah
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Reply By: HGMonaro - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:34

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:34
They can come in handy, but only for 'local' communications (your travelling companions, other cars, trucks, maybe stations). UHF range is not very far depending on terrain, weather, etc.
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Reply By: Rob! - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:43

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:43
It is only reliable for 5km. So it's for short range comms only
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Follow Up By: Skippy In The GU - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:36

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:36
You must be using a handheld if your only get 5km range,
you should get 30kms with antenna on bullbar or more if antenna mounted on roof
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Follow Up By: Rob! - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 22:12

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 22:12
Yeah OK. Up to 30km
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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 20:01

Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 20:01
"You must be using a handheld if your only get 5km range, "

More like 2 tin cans.....A handheld transmitting at 5w to an external aerial will have the same distance as an incar unit (lets say Icom) with the same specs....
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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:44

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:44
G'day Sarah, By no means essential, & not to be relied on for emergency situations, but may be useful to chat to fellow travellers, truckies etc. Be aware
that you may be exposed to plenty of bad language, particularly in the more
populated areas.Very good if travelling in tandem with other vehicles, & just as
boring if you arent part of a group. Dont buy in preference to the stuff you really need, but if set up properly...why not ? cheers...oldbaz.
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Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:50

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:50
Frankly, I would say close to essential in some parts.

Useful in calling around and passing Road trains on dusty roads, certain tracks have a 'mandatory' requirement for a specific channel so oncoming vehicles can communicate, and always useful coming into unfamiliar towns - have got plenty of help from friendly locals for accommodation and mechanical services (and where's a good feed !)
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:52

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 16:52
I found my 19 year old Uniden invaluable of several occasions.

When coming up behind road trains on dirt or single lane bitumen, a polite call to the driver that I was behind and would like to pass when convenient to them, always resulted in a polite response and advice as to when to pass. On the Tanami a tanker driver stopped so that I could pass.

Now that is what I call useful.

RegardsPPhilip A
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Follow Up By: oztours - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 17:06

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 17:06
Hi

I used to have a Uniden in my hilux when I worked in Western QLD which was good. I used it on several occasions for similar reasons Philip A.

Thanks for the advice.
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:19

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:19
Also you can hear roadtrains approaching you if there is more than one of them and they are chatting - both of which are often the case. So you have a chance to find a place either to pull over or stop until the dust settles.

Cheers
J and V
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Reply By: oztours - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 17:43

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 17:43
Will a normal next G phone suffice?

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Follow Up By: Member - John R (cQld) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:23

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:23
Depends on exactly where you're going, and how much chance that there's not service you're willing to take. Have a look a Next G coverage maps on the Telstra website, but there isn't much coverage at all in the outback areas.
Most people would recommend a satellite phone or HF radio in such case.

Cheers, John

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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:10

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:10
3 G and UHF are Chalk and Cheese

A phone can only talk to those whose numbers you know

A UHF can talk to anyone in range on the same channel.

3G as Telstra will tell you now covers 99% of the population.

What they dont tell you is that the 99% live in about 12% of the area of the country.

They now say they cover 28% of the country Yeah well maybe.

Depending where you go it may well suffice as long as you dont go more than about 30 k from a tower.

IE between Broome and Hedland is over 600km I think there are towers at the 2 Roadhouses and thats it.

Get the idea.

We used a UHF and a Satfone for emergencies.

Didnt have any so didnt use it, luckily.

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Reply By: Member - Christopher P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:24

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:24
Totally agree, went to moreton island, My Sister and her Hubby, he rides biarch most of the time, was leader of our 2 car parade, called back to me when they ran into a road block. usually i was 50 metres back.

Will be putting in one in the old girl when i get the funds!!!!! i have a 6dB antenna thats awaiting to go in.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:31

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:31
Yes, a UHF transceiver is invaluable for outback driving. It gives you the ability to communicate with other travellers and receive information on local road conditions as you pass through different areas.

A 5 watt UHF radio should give coverage of around 20 kilometres or so and even more when using the repeater channels for specific purposes.

For an investment of around $350-$450 dollars, whether you choose a built-in 5 watt unit, or a 5 watt hand held unit with connection to an external antenna, you will be comfortable with this means of communication.

A UHF radio is also good for communicating with large trucks when wishing to either pass them, or have them pass you.


Bill.
Bill


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AnswerID: 423926

Follow Up By: oztours - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2010 at 15:14

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2010 at 15:14
Where can you get a cheap UHF - that is good enough to the do the job ?

and what brands?
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Reply By: howesy - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:39

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:39
If you are in range of a repeater station then your 5-20km flat terrain range can extend to 100km this is why all the outback people use them. When I travelled some remote areas a few years ago I had UHF and an AM radio with upper and lower side band an EPIRB and a sat phone.
Never used any of them for anything of urgency but its better to have em and not need em than not to have em while your frying in a desert.

Get the UHF they are standard equip. these days. Go here for some reading.

http://www.exploroz.com/Vehicle/Accessories/UHFRadio.aspx
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Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:53

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 18:53
Hi Sarah

YES

On some roads my husband has said "UHF should be compulsory here" (a good hand held will suffice). Essential for passing and allowing others to pass you, to announce and hear announcements from oncoming traffic on narrow roads at bridges and crests, and worthwhile to be aware of hazards up ahead. Stay in the highway channel 40 (unless other channel specified for that area), unless chit-chatting in which case move to another channel.

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Follow Up By: Member - Geoff H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 21:09

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 21:09
We just returned from a trip to Cape York and found the UHF invaluable for communication between our group and professional drivers.

There are so many vehicles and roadhouses on that road now that you don't really need anything else.

Regards
Geoff
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Reply By: D200Dug- Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 22:58

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 22:58
Most of the logging roads have the channels posted on signs so you can let log truck drivers know you are about, nothing worse than coming round a blind corner on a dirt road and finding 40 ton of timber and steel coming at you
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