Oil Coolers

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:16
ThreadID: 9502 Views:1597 Replies:6 FollowUps:33
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Hi All,
Just got back from a short trip up to Gold Coast from Sydney. Really just to see how the new toy would perform. Well I am impressed ! The Turbo is amazing. I only geared down into 4th gear on 5 occasions, and 3 of them were my fault as i didnt see the climbs comming.

I tried an experiment before i left home. I removed the metal plate that has 4 bolts and sits on chassis under the radiator. On my trip Up the engine ran at around half way on temp guage. I put it back on for my return trip. With it fitted the GQ ran between 1/4 and just under half for the hills.

Now for my Question..... I want to fit an oil cooler, does anyone know where the lines are connected? Any ideas of where the Cooler is safe to mount?

I have one here that was to be fitte dto my race car, but i never got round to doing it so i figured..its a damn good one so i may as well hook it up.
I heard that by fitting one it decreases the running temp of the engine, thus making the water temp drop even more.

Any feedback would be great. Cheers AngeloI love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:36

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:36
You mean engine oil cooler?

Manual or Auto?
AnswerID: 41754

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:56

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:56
Hey Truckster,
Yeh sorry mate..my brain is still travelling at 110 kms.

Yes i am refering to oil coolers...any suggestions?I love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:56

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 21:56
oops....manual :-)I love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 22:57

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 22:57
Engine Oil?

Gearbox Oil??
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:12

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:12
ok 3rd time lucky.....

Engine oil 4.2 TDI love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:12

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:12
ok 3rd time lucky.....

Engine oil 4.2 TDI love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:15

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:15
There isnt a small one already infront of radiator, next to the Air cond thing??
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:20

Sunday, Jan 04, 2004 at 23:20
Nope ! But thats not an option mate.

Intercooler will be going there soonI love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: AndrewX - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:16

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:16
Sorry to disagree Truckster but I've had 3 Prados and a Celica and none of them moved - that is apart from cold to operating temperature. I've certainly had vehicles in which the gauge altered. A Pajero I had used to move alarmingly high on pulling up after towing on a hot day. The old HQ used to sky rocket (I fitted a gauge because the red light didn't give me any warning). Believe me the Prados have never gone above centre. That's where they sit and I have towed a caravan on 40+ days and lugged through the high country in similar temps. It's just a matter of having a cooling system that will meet the requirements. Obviously Nissans don't have that and that is borne out by the experiences of friends with Patrols. Remember that the normal operatimg temp for the coolant is around 90C so an outside temp of 45C is not a problem to a vehicle with an adequate cooling system. By the way being a new car has NOTHING to do with it! A new vehicle with an inadequate cooling system will fail just as quickly as an old one!!
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:41

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:41
Sorry to disagree, but having driven around aust in trucks for 8 yrs, they all had temp gauges that moved, same as all my cars, and bikes,

Even talking with several people from the patrol lists tonight at the pub, we all had a laugh at it,

Try something we would like you to try, turn the key off, see if the thing moves.
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Follow Up By: Flash - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:02

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:02
I DO actually agree with you on that one Truckster.
There isn't a car on this planet that would run at exactly the same temp on a cold and bleak winter's day as it did on a 45 degree day.

Sorry AndrewX, I think you're either blind or off with the fairys. Maybe you have been looking at the fuel gauge??? ..the speedo?? ..the clock??

Just last week I was driving a mates nearly new Cruiser on a very warm day and it very nearly boiled towing a van up the range to Toowoomba.
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Reply By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 07:37

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 07:37
I've got one on the way for my 2H (apparently). It feeds from an adaptor that screws onto the oil filter fitting, and the filter screws onto it. Mine's going in front of the radiator.
AnswerID: 41782

Follow Up By: CHRIS - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 14:47

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 14:47
Dave,
I would be careful fitting that oil cooler on the radiator. After a lot of trouble with a overheating problem it was eventually traced to my oil cooler which sat in front of my radiator. I believe 2H"s do not need them. The oil cooler now is a inline water cooler for my Turbo and I no longer have a overheating problem.
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Follow Up By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 18:33

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 18:33
Thanks for the feedback, can you explain the inline water cooler idea??

Where is the cooler mounted?

I also have a turbo, and have blamed it for my overheating problems!!
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Reply By: AndrewX - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 08:43

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 08:43
Hello Cokeaddict. Are you sure that what you did changed the engine temp. In my opinion, the engine temp is controlled by the thermostat. It shouldn't matter if you piped snow to the radiator as the thermostat would shut off water flow from it until needed. Therefore check your thermostat as it should not allow the engine temp to fall too low. As for cooling your oil, why do it? There are optimum temps for engine operation and the vehicle should be set up to maintain those temps so why try to change it. The only time I would work on mods would be if the engine temp was rising beyond specs as happened with my HQ Holden many years ago. Engine operating temperatures has long been under control in all conditions in Toyotas for many years (in my experience - at least since my FJ55 in the late 70s). Is engine temperature one of the many problems with Nissan TDs?
AnswerID: 41785

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 10:31

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 10:31
Are you sure that what you did changed the engine temp. In my opinion, the engine temp is controlled by the thermostat.

Its a common thing on GQs that if you alter the pressure zone around the radiator, that the temp is affected.

When you do a body lift, you have to remove the lower shround on the radiator, or the fan hits it, its common for cars to run hotter then. Even if body lift is removed, and the shroud is left off, the temp stays at the hotter level.
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 10:42

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 10:42
Hey Andrew,
I am positive it did change temp setting. I didnt mention on my original post that the trip home was a scorcher of a day. Without a doubt in my mind it ran much cooler. I think Truckster sums it up perfectly in his comments.

As for the oil temp, I agree with what you say about running between certain temps. It will still be running between those temps, only towards the bottom end of the scale. Making things operate at lower temperatures thus allowing me more room to torque the engine up for longer periods if needed ...eg, climbing a monster hill without worrying if she will cook before it gets to the top.

I Love the GQ, its my second one. They have taken me to some very amazing and remote places. And yes the landcruiser is just as good, i am not here to knock the oposition. But the way i see things, Its all well and good heading into the unknown with the limited amounts most of us know when it comes to real survival if something was to go wrong. I always think ahead incase something DID happen, thats just how i plan things. And its nice to know that with some simple mods (at great expense) I can help the GQ stay cooler allowing less chance of a major heating problem to spoil my fun.I love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: basecamp15 - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 16:15

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 16:15
Andrew. Engine temperature is one of the FEW problems with the Nissan, from my experience (very limited) it's mostly the TD42 as the radiator is not big enough (4x4 Australia mentioned this fact a while ago when comparing the three Patrols available... or was it overlander).
Cheers, Mark.
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Follow Up By: AndrewX - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 21:56

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 21:56
Hey Coke
If you did reduce the engine temp by changing the airflow the engine must have been operating above the range of the thermostat. My temp gauge does not move whether it is 45C 0r 5C and towing,cruising or in the city and that's because the cooling system can always maintain the temp required by the thermostat. Yours obviously got well over the thermostat temperature and when you improved the flow it brought it back.
You certainly have a problem and you are quite right to try to solve it. A previous post said the radiator is not big enough and it sounds like that to me. Your best option is to fit a radiator large enough to cool your motor under all conditions. I'd also go back to the manufacturer as this sort of design fault was common in the 70s but is just not acceptable today.
Just another thought - you mentioned the gauge going to I think you said below half. Gauges are normally calibrated to read in the middle for "normal", and below that suggests that your engine was below normal operating temperature. This should not happen if your thermostat is working correctly so I suggest that you also test that. Just take it out, suspend it in water over a heat source and take the temperature at which it opens. The temp should be stamped on the thermostat. You can also get thermostats that open at lower temperatures. I had to do that with my HQ in the 70s. It gave me, as you describe, the ability to cool the motor down before a long hill. BUT the bottom line is - if you have to go to those measures, the cooling system is either inadequate or faulty and you or the manufacturer should rectify it. Cheers!
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 22:06

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 22:06
If your temp guage doesnt move in 45 degree heat, I would get it tested... Even new cars get movement in that temp.

On the GQ thing, I have a complete new cooling system down to the temp guage sender on the block, themostat, 4 core bigger rad, hoses, cap, the lot, and my temp guage moves...

Get a VDO one, I have and even it moves.
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Follow Up By: AndrewX - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:18

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:18
Sorry to disagree Truckster but I've had 3 Prados and a Celica and none of them moved - that is apart from cold to operating temperature. I've certainly had vehicles in which the gauge altered. A Pajero I had used to move alarmingly high on pulling up after towing on a hot day. The old HQ used to sky rocket (I fitted a gauge because the red light didn't give me any warning). Believe me the Prados have never gone above centre. That's where they sit and I have towed a caravan on 40+ days and lugged through the high country in similar temps. It's just a matter of having a cooling system that will meet the requirements. Obviously Nissans don't have that and that is borne out by the experiences of friends with Patrols. Remember that the normal operatimg temp for the coolant is around 90C so an outside temp of 45C is not a problem to a vehicle with an adequate cooling system. By the way being a new car has NOTHING to do with it! A new vehicle with an inadequate cooling system will fail just as quickly as an old one!!
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FollowupID: 304439

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:41

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:41
Sorry to disagree, but having driven around aust in trucks for 8 yrs, they all had temp gauges that moved, same as all my cars, and bikes,

Even talking with several people from the patrol lists tonight at the pub, we all had a laugh at it,

Try something we would like you to try, turn the key off, see if the thing moves.
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Follow Up By: AndrewX - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 15:48

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 15:48
Truckster I didn't make it clear. The gauges on all 3 Prados moved. They start off at cold but after reaching operating temperature they don't go any higher. I have driven many vehicles in the last 40 years and all but the Toyotas (1Celica and 3Prados) went above normal at times. Of course the people on the Patrol lists would be familiar with gauges going higher or lower. Believe me though a properly set up cooling system can keep an engine at the temp predetermined by the thermostat. This is of course if the outside temp is less than the coolant so if the air temp reached 90C the cooling system couldn't do it. You see it's all about heat transfer. Heat travels from areas of high temperature to areas of lower temperature. In the case of a vehicle cooling system the heat in the coolant is transferred (or radiated) via the radiator to the outside air. Although an outside air temp of 45C seems a very hot day it is no problem for an efficient cooling system to transfer coolant heat to the air even at that temp. But it does require a radiator with sufficient exposure to the air to do it. Factors such as air flow, tube size and number of fins per square inch are all important factors. From what I read on this forum and from the experience of friends with Patrols their cooling system specifications are such that they tend to have trouble with high air outside air temperatures. The Prado cooling system is such that at high outside air temps the normal coolant temp can be maintained. My only point is that it is possible to have a coling system that can do it. Your mates at the pub, if they are from the Patrol lists, have not experienced that and therefore assume that if their vehicle can't do then no other vehicle can do it. That's the sort of flawed logic you get from mates at the pub though. You might also like to consider that there are road trains in the outback with 3 trailers travelling in 45+ temperatures (49 at Birdsville yesterday) and they don't overheat. Consider how much more heat is generated by their engines than a 4wd. their cooling systems are designed to cope with the demands put on them. So are the systems on the last 3 vehicles I've owned. They cost more than yours and that is often a criticism of them but part of it is the research and development that goes into making them such a capable and reliable vehicle. Cheers
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FollowupID: 304514

Follow Up By: Flash - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:07

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:07
AndrewX, you obviously sell Toyotas.
If I promise not to tell anyone, can you give me a really really good deal on a new Tojo, like about twenty grand off?

Please.
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Follow Up By: TrucksterNT - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 20:45

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 20:45
I think you'll find many Toyota owners, not just AndrewX will tell you that they don't have problems with engines overheating. I'm sure they're not the only vehicles that can cope with all conditions. I have a Subaru that never exceeds the normal range regardless. Have friends with a Honda - same story. But I agree with Cokeaddict that his vehicle needs mods to be up to scratch.
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Reply By: David N. - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 17:07

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 17:07
Angelo
An oil cooler WILL help with engine temp, as normally you are removing temp from the oil into your coolant (Heat exchanger near the oil filters on a TD42 Patrol) -heat which then has to be removed by the radiator.
For the same reason an automatic will usually run hotter than a manual (Heat from transmission fluid will go into your coolant as well.) Truckster knows about this, as his is auto...
An oil cooler is a damn good idea for any engine which works hard in hot conditions. If your oil is kept closer to optimum temp... say 80 to 90 degrees celsius- then your engine, your oil seals, and your oil will all last longer. Put an oil temp gauge on (I have a VDO one) and you'll find oil temp gets way too hot when your donk is working hard! An oil cooler (I also have one) helps this situation a lot, as well as the problem of engine overheating. My oil cooler dropped oil temps by probably 10 degrees on average, (from 90-100 average to say 80-90) and helped the engine keep it's cool as well! But even with the oil cooler I have seen well over 110 degrees celsius oil temp! . (Summer, towing and 4wding uphill!) Goodness knows what it has reached in the past before an oil cooler or gauge.

Of course if you lived in say Tasmania, I probably wouldn't bother as it's usually a lot colder....
Cheers
AnswerID: 41841

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 18:57

Monday, Jan 05, 2004 at 18:57
Hi David,
Thanks for your reply mate. I am determined to put one on, only problem i have is...WHERE will it fit? Cant put it infront of radiator, just no room as a intercooler will be going there soon. So I am looking at somewhere down just above the chassis running a fan over it and possibly running an air scoop to lead the cool air into it. But I will work out something.

Ahhhhhhh..... the joys of modificationsI love it when you talk DIRTY !
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Follow Up By: David N. - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 10:06

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 10:06
Yeh, it is a problem....
Mine is behind the 'roo bar, pointing at about 45 degrees to the vertical, with a small electric fan which I can turn on manually.
However it does need to be well protected from sticks etc. or you could be stranded.
I always have enough spare oil and a means to bypass the oil cooler for just such a situation so's I can still get home.
Cheers and happy 2004.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:34

Tuesday, Jan 06, 2004 at 23:34
Go an over the engine Intercooler. Like the new 4.2 GU. GU bonnet scoop ($100ish) to assist with air flow, and your laughin.

Intercooler infront of the radiator will only make things worse, hot air via Intercooler into Radiator that is already having issues.. Not a good idea!
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Follow Up By: AndrewX - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 15:53

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 15:53
I agree Truckster, it's not a good idea to put any more heat in front of an already inadequate cooling system.
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Follow Up By: Flash - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:12

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 18:12
AndrewX, you are sounding like a cracked record. Absolutely pathetic, in fact.
There's always some smart alec when somebody asks a genuine question. Shut the @#%# up and go back to your Toyota dealership!
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Follow Up By: Mick - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 20:49

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 20:49
Well Flash, haven't you added some class to this forum. If you can't present an argument, just scream abuse. I guess you know all about road rage.
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Follow Up By: David N. - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 21:26

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 21:26
Congrats Mick.
Seems you're in the same league as our friend "AndrewX", who turns a fair dinkum query into a stupid Nissan Toyota debate.
And as for your comments about road rage for "Flash", I suspect you're the expert at road rage.
Fascinating. Bye
Hope we (don't) have the (dis)pleasure of meeting.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 23:11

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 23:11
AndrewX posted this followup

I agree Truckster, it's not a good idea to put any more heat in front of an already inadequate cooling system.

Doesnt matter if you have refrigerant (sp?) running thru your radiator, any car, putting heat into the radiator aint a good thing, specially the temps that Turbo air gets, 450c etc...
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FollowupID: 304607

Reply By: Flash - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 21:18

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 21:18
?? Learn to read, Mick. Read between the lines a bit, IF you know what that means.

cokeaddict asked a genuine question which AndrewX has done his best to turn into a stupid Toyota/Nissan thing.
So what the hell are you on about?
AnswerID: 42132

Follow Up By: AndrewX - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 08:14

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 08:14
Should I not have mentioned yhr name of my vehicle? Perhaps I should have said, "My vehicle which I can't name because of people who will think I'm picking on them." Come on Flash this forum is for sharing info on vehicles and many other aspects of 4wding. After all Cokeaddict started by telling us about a cooling problem he was having with his vehicle and I told him how another vehicle I've had extensive experience with performs. It was to give him a benchmark or a standard to refer to and to explain what can be achieved. At no time was it intended to be a one versus the other argument and I'm sorry you took it that way. It would be fairly useless if I told him about my vehicle's ability to handle high temperatures (many vehicles can do it by the way) but didn't tell him what it was.
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Follow Up By: David N. - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 09:55

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 09:55
AndrewX- So Flash suggests you sell Toyotas.
I would suggest the same.
Is that not true? C'mon, answer the question... truthfully.
Angelo (Cokeaddict) was not interested in a spiel on the virtues or vices on any particular vehicle. I could say I have a Lexus 4wd which is better than his, but I don't and it would be stupid of me to even mention a Lexus -even if I did have one. It is equally irrelevant for you to mention your Prado.
If you reread his question he was after advice on fitting an oil cooler on a GQ diesel 4.2,- so why don't you answer accordingly IF you have something constructive, insted of "mines better than yours..."-very childish actually.

By the way, I've seen Prados with major problems OTHER than overheating, but that is totally irrelevant and I've also seen many Cruisers overheating too, but so is that irrelevant! Do you get the point?
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FollowupID: 304645

Follow Up By: AndrewX - Friday, Jan 09, 2004 at 05:49

Friday, Jan 09, 2004 at 05:49
David I have at no time said "mines better than yours" I only used my experience with 3 Prados all in high temperature and heavy load conditions to illustrate that it is possible for a cooling system to keep an engine at correct operating temperature. I don't sell Toyotas. Even if I did what possible value could there be to me by telling you of good experiences with them. Think about it! I could be anywhere from Manangatang North to New York and so could you!! Not much value in pushing a product in that situation. Marketing is all about identifying your customer and targetting them but I guess you don't understand that. HAve a read of post 9600.
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FollowupID: 304765

Reply By: Member - DOZER- Friday, Jan 09, 2004 at 11:41

Friday, Jan 09, 2004 at 11:41
Gday Coke
Ive just returned from GC aswell, and was travelling thru Grafton the 45 deg day 2 days ago...well the petrol auto cruiser ran at half as it does normally.
I was impressed, and put it down to me removing all the lights off the bar b4 the trip, aswell as a properly maintained cooling system.
Had i been towing my van, it would have been higher for sure, as the motor would have been working harder burning more fuel.
I once tried to direct more air into my car by putting a spoiler on the bottom of the rad support facing forward, and found it to increase temp, as the scooped air sitting above the road is hotter than what comes in the grill.
Also, check to see that the motor doesnt already have a oil cooler built into the block where the water runs, Toyotas all have that!
My opinion....KISS (keep it simple stupid) dont change a thing unless Safari (or whoever) say it is needed.
Andrew
wheredayathinkwer mike?
AnswerID: 42339

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