crossing the simpson in a pathy

Hi All
i have a standard desiel ti 2010 auto pathfinder
I am wanting to cross the simpson in it , can anyone give me any idea on fuel usage in this vehicle 1 adult 4boys and swags
Only have a 80ltr tanks so are a bit concerned about extra fuel I will need to carry (and where )
any tips on what tyres as I am due for new ones and tips on roof rack and safe load weight for desert trip
Thanks
RL
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:19

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:19
Hi RL

Firstly you will need to take extra fuel, 20 litres might be enough, but 40 litres would get you through very comfortably.

Tyre pressures are very critical and for a first time desert traveller, drop them down to 14psi and you should be fairly right. For Big Red drop them even lower, say 10psi.

If you are about to replace the tyre, then a good AT would be fine and even better in a LT construction. Do not get fooled that you need big aggressive tyre tread patterns, they might work fine for the mud and are the exact opposite for what you need for sand driving.

If you are taking a roof rack, make sure that it is a quality built rack designed for a reliable 4x4 accessories manufacturer, as I have seen 2 cases out in the Simpson from people that you could not tell anything, with cheap $70 racks that broke the second dune crossing into the Simpson.

For a first time crossing, I would travel West to East to give you a feel of what true 4x4 sand driving is all about. There are only 3 main routes across the desert, the French Line, WAA and Ring Road in South Australia and then only in through Queensland, the QAA Line. In the SA section, do a mixture of all the tracks and must see features are of course the Lone Gum and the Knolls.

Plan on 4 days as a minimum and you should have a great time. Also a tip for first time desert swag sleepers, make sure that you have the highest quality rated sleeping bags, as on cloudless nights, below zero will be expected. Do not leave any cloths or footwear out during the night, as you may wake up with one shoe gone or your pants many metres away and chewed - from the dingos, but do not worry, they will not hurt you. When our boys were little, we would use a small plastic garden rake to clear the area under your swags and next morning you could see dingo prints in the freshly raked sand and on one trip there was even sandy dingo prints over the bottom of one of the boys swags.

Make sure that you use a sand flag and the recommended UHF Channel is Channel 10, but scan so you can hear anyone that may be using a different channel. A long handled shovel is a must have and if you can find the space, a set of MaxTrax could be very handy.



If you enjoy seeing the desert at its very best, you will have a fantastic time and will be planning you next return trip.



Safe travels and enjoy the Simpson




Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

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AnswerID: 485614

Follow Up By: Ozrover - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:37

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:37
What he said! LOL!!!

Spot on Stephen!

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Reply By: Member - Bucky - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:23

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:23
RL

Probably need to carry at least 1, 20 lt jerry can of diesel.

Do you have any fuel figures for hard going ?

Click here for help

Cheers
Bucky


AnswerID: 485616

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:35

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:35
RL
I only use BF Goodrich LT tyres.
There are heaps of others on the market, but they are my preference

In the Desert (on the Patrol) I run 12 psi in the front, and 15 psi in the rear, all hot pressures, and it's a bit like a boat when you start off.
I keep speed down to below 40 km/hr, and in most cases 10-15 km/hr.

When approaching sand dunes, I use momentum to get me over the dunes, and not speed. I found low range 2nd gear, to be brilliant.
With low tyre pressures you will feel your vehicle climb up onto the top of the sand, and not try and dig thru it.

I have a Tyre Plyer repair kit, and know how to use it, (get some lessons, before you leave) and carry 2 tubes, and spare cases too.

Just waddling along, and it's easy on everythting.
Above all enjoy the place, as it is really special.

Cheers Bucky

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FollowupID: 760853

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:46

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 08:46
I absolutely endorse Stephens comments.

Where to carry the extra fuel?..... well not inside the vehicle, which puts it on the roofrack, ditto for LPG bottle, so you need to check on the Pathys specification for roof loads. The swags would be good on the rack.

Water: You should allow 4 litres/day/person to cover drinking/cooking/washing. Four boys?.... well perhaps you can forget the washing! LOL. If the water is carried in jerries inside the vehicle they should be secured as in case of rollover a full jerry can impart significant injury. A cargo barrier would be good insurance.

Leave the drive in 4WD for the whole crossing. The vehicle will handle better & safer and less damage to the track.

Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 485620

Reply By: Member - Vern (North Haven SA) - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 09:16

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 09:16
RL Boys

I did the Simpson in my 2005 Pathy in 2010. I carried a extra 60lt of Desiel with me. When we crossed the from Mt Dare to Birdsville I used exactly 100lts of fuel. The trip across the Desert is about 550ks and we did the ring route and did 684 ks in total. So it really depends on what you plan on doing in the desert. The Pathy was great on the trip and handled Big Red no problems with low tyre pressure and 3rd gear low range from bottom to top.

Enjoy your trip.
AnswerID: 485622

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 11:00

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 11:00
Hi Vern, I bet you didn't have the water tanks in the 'Castle' full though! LOL

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Vern (North Haven SA) - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 11:15

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 11:15
LOL The Pathy was good but not that good to drag the "castle" across. the "castle" stayed at home.

The Pathy did have a 50 lt water tank behind the rear seats though.
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Reply By: Patrol22 - Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 19:34

Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 19:34
I crossed from west to east a couple of years back in a Nissan D40 (ie a sort of chopped Pathy :-) -between Mt Dare and Birdsville I used 115 ltrs Car was auto diesel 2.5 ltr with DPF.
AnswerID: 485653

Reply By: RL boys - Sunday, May 13, 2012 at 09:39

Sunday, May 13, 2012 at 09:39
Thanks all for the very usefull comments really appreciated
carrying the fuel looks to be the main concern perhaps ,
will do a days run in the sand dunes around here to get a better feel for fuel use
roof rail rating is 100kgs so i guess would want to put more than 50kgs up there for a crossing and some say not to put fuel on roof but would have thought it safer than in back even inside a sealed storage case
thanks again
RL
AnswerID: 485685

Follow Up By: Gronk - Sunday, May 13, 2012 at 18:29

Sunday, May 13, 2012 at 18:29
Apart from the smell' I'd have no problems carrying diesel inside a 4wd...as long as it was properly secured..

It's not volatile like petrol.....you'd need to have a campfire inside the 4wd to get it to burn...lol
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FollowupID: 760969

Follow Up By: Gossy - Monday, May 14, 2012 at 13:39

Monday, May 14, 2012 at 13:39
diesel inside the car is fine. Petrol is not.

Jerry cans are old school these days. Empty or full they take up the same space:

Check out http://www.liquidcontainment.com/fuel_bladders.php Rolls up to your weekend news paper when empty!

I wouldn't be putting your fuel on the roof. Corrugations exagerate the weight up there so your gutters will be under alot of stress. Forced to with petrol but diesel is fine to go inside.

Everything else said is correct but clearance hasn't been mentioned. If you have your standard front bumper on still expect this to be damaged as it hangs quite low.

Tyre pressure is everything; get that right and you'll wonder what all the fuss was about when you get to the end!
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FollowupID: 761032

Follow Up By: RL boys - Monday, May 14, 2012 at 16:55

Monday, May 14, 2012 at 16:55
thanks will look at bladders ,front bumper gone
i am not too worried about desiel inside either (if no option )except smell and if it is securced properly , it isnt good firelighter without a lot of heat.
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FollowupID: 761048

Reply By: GT Campers - Monday, May 14, 2012 at 09:09

Monday, May 14, 2012 at 09:09
all good advice/experience there, another liittle hint, to reduce stress on the roof (if that is where you carry it) get the fuel from the jerries down into the tank as soon as you can, for instance as soon as the gauge shows, say, 2/3 or 3/4
AnswerID: 485768

Follow Up By: RL boys - Monday, May 14, 2012 at 16:58

Monday, May 14, 2012 at 16:58
thanks for all the great tips from all
all looking forward to a great trip
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FollowupID: 761050

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