Wolfies Excellent Adventure...

Submitted: Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:05
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Well people, I had the opportunity to partake in a self drive catered safari, roaming along the Beadell tracks, through South Australia, Western Australia, & the Nothern territory.

3 states, and 3 deserts.....

Okay, Wednesday 10 th. May, Jim & I left Adelaide, in Jims Nissan 3.0 litre GU, and headed up to Woomera, where we were to meet the tour guides, and the other tour self drivers. This trip is all bitumen from Adelaide, and allowing for some lunch at Port Augusta, it was a fairly quiet 6 1/2 hour trip.

Upon arrival at the Woomera Travellers Village, we quickly set up camp, and mingled with the other crew, along with the tour leaders. Prior to dinner, we were all introduced formally to eachother, along with the tour organiser, tour cook, and Connie Sue Beadell.

We were assigned a vehicle number, which we were to retain for the whole of the tour, along with other tour rules, which mainly applied to the kitchen area, as this was a catered tour. After the one hour meeting, we all broke away for tea...... and drinks.....

Thursday morning, after our first catered breakfast, we departed Woomera, and headed up to Coober Pedy, stopping at Lake Hart for morning tea, and Glendambo for lunch ( all supplied by the tour ), arriving at the Coober Pedy caravan park for our second evening together. We all had our first 3 course meal as supplied by the tour, and it was going to be a mighty fine trip!!

Now, I am not going to mention any names here, but I will go as far as to tell you, that there were 7 vehicles in the convoy. 2 Toyota 100 series Landcruisers, operated by the tour company, a Toyota Troopy, with a lift lid camper, a Nissan GU 4.2, our Nissan 3.0 GU, a Mitsubishi Pajero ( latest model ), and a Toyota Hilux, with a canopy on the rear.

Friday 13 th. May ...... what was that we all heard about friday the 13 th? Okay...... we all left Coober Pedy, and turned left onto the Coober Pedy - Mabel Creek Station Road, the fist of our dirt roads, which is all we would see for around the next 6 days. We arrived at the Station, and as Jim & I alighted from the Nissan, we heard air escaping from our rear right tyre..... bugger....
And what was the cause of this punture? A pair of scissors!!! It seems they were coverd up in the dirt, and we drove over them. I told Connie that they were probably her old man’s, like the ones he used to cut hair with....

Moving along the Anne Beadell Highway, basically a 2 wheel track, complete with lots of corrugations. The Hilux lost it’s UHF antenna, got sheared off by an overhanging tree. Another member of our convoy lent him a handheld radio for the remainder of the trip.

We entered the Tallaringa Conservation Park, and after crossing through the dingo fence, we took a small deviation, and arrrived at a claypan, which has a row of stones laid along it, on a true north - south axis, called by Len Beadell, the Misplaced Stones. As of today, there is still no tangible reason as to why, and who laid these stones, in their upright positions along the centre of this claypan.

Still moving, and yet another drama, the Pajero, complete with new OME suspension, lost the rear right top shock mount, and the shock absorber let go, and pierced the floor of the Paj. We had ro remove the wheel to free the top of the shock, after removing the bottom mount. After the removal of the shock, we then had to snatch the tour leader from soft sand, as his trailer had been too much of a drag, and broke through the soft sandy crust.

So, we finally arrived at our first bush camp, and started some repairs. I removed our tyre, patched it, and while the glue was going off, I managed to change both rear shcks on the Pajero. Back to my tyre....... no-one had a compressor which had enough wind to seal the bead, we tried every trick in the book. I ended up putting a tube inside the tyre..... job finished.

So, that was Friday 13th........

Saturday 14th. May..... we headed off to the Emu Atomic test sites, Camera “C”, and Totem 1, and Totem 2, where two tests were released in the late 1950’s. Even though the sites are now nearly 50 years old, and have been cleared up of infrastructure, there are still remainders of concrete blocks, and steel, to remind you of the devastation these bombs unleashed. There is still a lot of glazed sand to be found, although I don’t think I would like to be souverniering any!

From Emu, we headed south towards the Maralinga test site, but our permits would only allow us to go down as far as the halfway point, which is clearly marked by a tree with one of Len’s plaques in a blaze. On the way down, the Hilux copped a flat tyre on the front right, it was staked, and the tour leader, copped a staked tyre on the left rear, on a new, yet to be released Cooper STT.
We did the wheel changes, and continued.

At camp that night, I repaired the tyre on the Hilux, and inserted a tube, because I had quickly learnt, that no-one had a weapon compressor..... and it gets worse........ the compressor on the hilux had died, along with the one on the Paj. The vibrations were starting to take their toll! The tour leader simply left his tyre, along with the stake sticking out of it, on the spare carrier, to show Cooper Tyres.......

The corrugations along this stretch of track also played havoc with the rear bumper - tail light assembly on the 4.2 Nissan, as it needed all new screws & nuts, which were inserted during a lunch break.

Sunday 15 th. May ... our trip back up to Volkes Hill Corner was on the very same road we came down on...... rough. The tour leader lost a swag, it worked loose off the trailer, but was recovered by the following vehicle. We arrived at camp, after traversing, what could be basically called, a 2 wheel track, running through red sand dunes. Upon arrival into camp, we discovered another flat tyre on our Nissan..... front left..... side-wall stake.

Monday 16 th. May... woke up this morning....... to see another flat tyre....... front right....... bugger........ We have used both of our available spares until tonight, when we can effect some repairs. The troopy was about to leave this morning....... front right..... flat.......

Called the roadhouse at Nundroo, on the Nullabor, on the sat phone, to try to organise some more inner tubes to be shipped across to Eucla, by Wednesday.... fingers crossed.

Left camp, and headed down to our proposed campsite, halfway between Volkes Hill Corner, and Cook. On the way down, our tour cook extraodinaire, did another Cooper STT..... ruined...... To rub salt in the wound, the 100 series Toyota, along with its suspension lift, needed 2 trolley jacks, to only raise the vehicle enough to dig the last 3 inches around the front tyre!!! Apparently, because of the lift it’s had, you can’t safely jack up on the IFS arms...... This little operation alone, took over 1/2 an hour, to change a tyre. There were people, blocks of wood, jacks, shovels....... looked like a real comedy of errors.

Upon arrival at camp, I set out my tarp, and proceeded to repair our two tyres. One got a tube, whilst the other simply got a wick. Missed out on photographing a wicked sunset, because I was all busy like, never mind.

Tuesday 17 th. May... Left our bush camp, and headed towards Cook. On the way, we stopped at some shed tanks, and refilled our dwindling water supplies.
We also stocked up on some firewood for our nexy few nights out along the Nullabor. Trailer & vehicles stacked with mulga.....

Arrived at Cook, which is now only manned by two families. All that happens here now, is the refuelling of railway diesel engines, and the changeover of train crews, who stay in the barracks. The folk at Cook were kind enough to allow us to camp within the town confines, and supplied us with plentifull firewood. We invited them over ( all 4 of them ) for dinner & drinks that evening, we had a ball.

Wednesday 18 th. May... Cook to Eucla. Arrived at Eucla at around 2:30 SA time. We keep SA time for the whole trip. It make for packing up in the mornings progressively darker, but allows us more afternoon light to set up camps. The guy in the Pajero managed to get his pair of replacement shock absorbers shipped over from Adelaide, and we fitted those. We got our inner tubes, they were simply put on a truck, and the truck dropped them off at the fruit & veg. inspection point. One of the ladies that works there, dropped them up to the caravan park for us, after she had finished her shift.

Learnt something...... the west australians make the crappiest iced coffee! I’ve been away from shops for a week, and then I drink one of their iced coffee’s...... yuk!!!!!

After refuelling, we work out that the 3.0 litre Nissan is still returning around 13 litres / 100 kilometres. About 1/3 rd. of this distance was in 3 rd. gear!!

Thursday 19 th. May... We travel the bitumen along the Nullabor, until we get to Cocklebiddy, then turn north towards Rawlinna. The country here is very....... flat. We camped on one of these...... flat areas. Thankfully, we had no wind, because if we did, there was nothing, except for our vehicles, to use as a solid wind break.

Friday 20 th. May... We arrived at Rawlinna at around lunchtime. All that is here now is a small limestone mine, which is the only source of income for the few that live here. The railway station closed long ago, along with everything else. We managed to camp at the Rawlinna Showgrounds, which is on the outskirts of town, and had the use of the huge shed, to set up for our kitchen & eating area. We had the afternoon to ourselves, and did what we pleased. We managed to get a donkey lit, and get some water pumped across from town, to an overhead tank, so those that wished, could shower. Most of us just simply took the time to veg out & relax.

Saturday 21 st. May... Leave Rawlinna, and head off up to Warburton. Country changes from boring flat....... to red sandhills & mulga. The 4.2 Nissan received a stake in the rear lefthand tyre upon arriving into camp for the evening. I plugged it with a wick...... all is good.

Sunday 22 nd. May... Leave our bush camp, and head up to Neale Junction. The second 100 series Landcruiser loses a Koni rear shock, and costs us around an hour of repair time.

Monday 23 rd. May... We have entered into aboriginal lands, and part of our permit conditions require that we do not consume any alcohol whilst in transit of these lands, which will be for the next three days. We arrive at the Warburton Service Station / Caravan Park & Refuel & re-water, before moving on for our evening bush camp. We also pick up our liaison person for the remainder of our trip. Without this person, who has lived & worked in these areas for the last 41 years, our permits would have not have been forthcoming.

Tuesday 24 th. May... Leave our bush camp, and head off to Warakurna, where we are staying for the night. Reasonably uneventful trip, especially through aboriginal lands, as the roads are in far better condition, and mechanical failures are not as prevalent. We arrive at Warakurna late afternoon, and set up camp. There are 3 separate burials due for the 1 st. June, and there are 3 separate sorry camps, which has attracted about 1000 extra people. The mood in town is difficult to fathom.

Wednesday 25 th. May... Camp at Warakurna was waaaay cool!! Dingo’s yowling, and coming right up to my swag!! I spied another brand of WA iced coffee in the roadhouse, and tried it......... can’t wait till we get to SA!
We went up to the Giles Weather Station, and had a tour, which included watching the high altitude balloon be launched. After the tour, we head east, to the SA border, to another community, called Kalka. Upon arrival, we are allowed to camp in the most wicked creek setting I have ever camped in. The local women then come down to our camp, and we buy some local art. A truly magnificent place to stay!

Thursday 26 th. May... Left Kalka, and we are heading for Mulga Park Station, in the NT. Tonight we are allowed to drink, once we are in the station boundary. On the way, we are allowed access into Amata Community, where we visit their art gallery, and make some more purchases. Upon arrival at Mulga Park Station, myself, and another tour member, we fabricate a plaque, from a Diet Coke can, and insert it into a blaze on a tree, and photograph it. We call this tree, the Wet & Dry Tree, and the plaque depicts the border of Non Drinking, and Drinking. The plaque is a pictogram, so many people from different countries can understand it. Even Connie thought it was funny.....
Oh, we are all drinking now.

Friday 27 th. May... Jim & I leave the tour at this point, as they are heading up to Alice Springs. We are heading down towards Coober Pedy, to stay in the Painted Desert. Upon arrival at Marla, in SA, I seen the holy grail........ Farmers Union Iced Coffee........ in the fridge......... heaven!!
We leave Marla after lunch, and head in towards the Painted Desert, where we come across a couple, towing a standard road caravan, behind a GQ. The caravan lost it’s rear axle assemby, complete..... it was laying beside the caravan. We lent them out sat phone, and they then proceeded to Copper Hills Station for the night. We managed to get our sunset photos, and went back to our camp.

Saturday 28 th. May... Left the Painted Desert, and stopped at the Breakaways, near Coober Pedy. After lots of photos, we headed for Woomera, stayed overninight, and arrived back home in Adelaide on Sunday afternoon.

Seen some wicked countryside, met some wonderful people, and took some great photographs. I spent all of my nights in my swag, and was quite cosy. The weather was fine throughout the whole of the trip. The most we ever had to pay for diesel was $1.59. I have recently changed ISP, so when I get some spare time, I will put some photos up on my site, but don’t hold your breath.

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Kiwi Kia - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:30

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:30
Thanks, I enjoyed it.
Ray H.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:12

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:12
Thank you....

Wolfie
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Reply By: GOB & denny vic member - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:42

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:42
goodday wolfie
it sounds like you had a great time although i would have thought an experienced guide would have had a decent compressor its great when you have a good trip even if small things (flat tyres ) happen its all part of the trip

your story makes a good read
thank you

steve
AnswerID: 114129

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:14

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:14
I guess you can't always rely on the guide. The criteria did state that we bring our own gear. We, were the only ones with tyre removal stuff, that's why I ended up being the tyre changing bitch!!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - Brian (WA) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:53

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 20:53
Sounds like you had a good trip, good reading. brian
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:15

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:15
Cheers Brian....

Wolfie
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Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:10

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:10
Wolfie
Great trip. Shame about the equipment problems. You must have upset the rubber gods pretty badly (perhaps they were West Oz tyres). We did Coober to Vokes Hill Cnr to Cook in about Easter 2000. Great Vic desert, which you circumnavigated, is a ripper. In 2001 we went from Annes Cnr up the Mt Davies Rd to Pip. We did the Marla to Pip/SG corner/Wingellina/Blackstone last year. Excellent country. 3 days off the turps would have been pretty hard to handle. Its no wonder they turn to sniffing.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:16

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:16
I never at any stage gave much thought to the breakdowns. To me, it turned just a jaunt in the sticks, to a bit of an adventure. 'twas all good fun!!

Cheers Wolfie
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Reply By: Exploder - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:21

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:21
Enjoyed the read, sounds like you had a good trip. Not with out a few Standard problems, but it keep’s it interesting.
The guy in the Pagero must not of been imprested with the shock issue.

You must be over the whole tyre repairing experience, I look forward to seeing some of the photos whenever you get around to it.
AnswerID: 114140

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:18

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:18
The camp cook, and I mean the..... cook, who cooks at the camp :), gave me extra rations for my tyre changing deeds!

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:26

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:26
Wolfie, good to see you are still having fun mate. Catch up some time.
Cheers,
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John

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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:19

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:19
Cheers John. Tell me.... what's with the Moses handle?

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:39

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:39
Wolfie, Moses is the name given to the Nissan last weekend for the ability to clear the way for followers. Had the ability to sweep water aside said Kir, so she Christened it Moses. No commandments necessary, Heather suggested I include it in the handle when there was a guy with a Landie decided to call himself Member - John R (VIC) I mean I admit I have driven a Landie TD5, but I wouldn't go that far mate.

I did enjoy your report mate - nearly to the scientific thesis level but no prescritions. LOL
Cheers,
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John

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Reply By: Tim HJ61 (WA) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:28

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:28
Thanks Wolfie, I'm off to stock up on inner tubes!

Any tips or moments of wisdom you gained about what you'd do different next time, or ways to minimise the equipment failures and tyre problems?

Tim
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:22

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:22
I guess inner tubes, and patches covers most things for us.

I have read so much, about people taking extra shock absorbers with them, but thought to myself..... nahhhh.....

We were simply smitten by tyre trouble, and two of the repairs simply HAD to have tubes, compressor not withstanding, as the damage was beyond a normal repair.

We each had 6 tyres, and next time, we intend to take 6 tubes.

Wolfie
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Reply By: Brew69(SA) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:46

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:46
Only one place in the world who do a good iced coffee wolfie.........and thank god it here is SA. Its a Framers Union Iced Coffee or it's nothing. Anything else is absolute crap!!! Glad u had a good time mate.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:22

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:22
Farmers Union Iced Coffee......

...... truly a nectar sent from the Gods!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Moses - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:45

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:45
Brew and Wolfie, there is a new Victorian replacement for it and in chocolate too but is from a union of farmers and others too. ........Great Ocean Road Iced Coffee and Chocolate. I just don't go the others now. Funny thing is it is made locally and if I knew how to get supplies through to you I would. It's available from near Geelong to Mt Gambier. You got to love it....
Cheers,
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John

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Reply By: Patrolman Pat - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:58

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 21:58
A great report Wolfie. You left out the bit about the frangers at the servo though mate. ; ))
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:23

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:23
I think we should leave that one for around the campfire....lol.....

Wolfie
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Reply By: Des Lexic - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:10

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:10
Thanks for the great read Ian.
We are heading that way shortly and I am now rethinking my spares and take extra patches. What tyre pressure were you running and were you fully loaded.
Were the stake holes generally fairly small that could be repaired with a wick?
I'm glad the diesel price is not too excessive considering we pay $1.20 here.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:25

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:25
We were running 33 all round. This seemed to help with our load, and the corrugations, and the bagging out on the bottom was minimal.

Some holes were about 25 mm. in diameter, whilst most were around say..... 3.0 mm.

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - Dr Jim (Syd) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:20

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:20
Thanks for the info from your trip. We are leaving Sydney on the 25th of June, heading across to Kal up to Laverton and back to Coober Pedy via Anne Beadell. Will make sure all in the group have their nuts done up, their rubber tubes packed and the wine packed in shock absorbing foam rubber. Sounds like the 20D and 28-300 IS L series will get a workout.
Jim
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:27

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:27
I gave my 70 - 200 L a mighty fine workout. I took around 1100 photos, of which 900 were with the L.

People grabs at f2.8, were excellent, stand far enough away, and watch while they were engrossed in their own world, and shoot, makes for some really nice candids.

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Brian B (QLD) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:58

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 22:58
Mate that was a great read. I am pleased you enjoyed the trip.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:27

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:27
Thank you Brian

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 23:54

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 23:54
Gotta agree with all, its a great read. Nice to see you had a great time.

Cheers

Captain
Its not what you drive, but how you drive it!
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:29

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:29
Captain, thank you. The Nissan performed admirably, but you knew anyway....lol!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 23:54

Thursday, Jun 02, 2005 at 23:54
Great yarn, Wolfie; well done on a good report despatched so soon after returning o the hub of civilisation. Have done some of that country meself a few years ago. Was so hungry that I ate a crow roasted in the camp oven - some bastar* passed it off as duck at the time, & has enjoyed his practical joke at my expense since. Oh well, it is funny in retrospect.

Learnt the compressor/tyre lessonS myself recently. I underline multiple lessons:

1. I & my bro-in-law were recently away in very rough gibber country for 7 days. Me in my GU, him in his 80 series. On day 2 we effectively had to abandon his vehicle as he had killed 4 of the 6 tyres he carried. He did not bring any tubes & the sidewall damage was too large to repair by plugs or patches. A gaiter & tube would have got us mobile. This changed the whole trip schedule & the only person I blame is me - as 'leader' I should have made sure he was fully equipped.

2. In a few of the many attempts to repair tyres - yes I had a few sidewall stakes (bro-in-law had rock fractures) on my vehicle - I could not reseat the bead without a tube. Tried every trick. Not such a major hassle as I had enough tubes & patches etc to cope. I had my trusty 'ole ARB under bonnet pump in use...............for friggin hours!

It is kinda tiring in 38 degree heat to fix tyres on a tarp on the ground. Even more tiring to do 4 a day. Time to get serious, young man - Decision made while repairing tyres in the sticks - get a high volume, top performing pump when I return to Adelaide. Bugger the cost. This ain't beach cruising at Little Dip, this is serious hard work.

So when back, I searched the net, read the mags including 4wd 12/12thly (monthly, stupid), spoke to retailers etc & paid $ 769 for a Twin Tongue & hose etc. Have used it twice - bloody fantastic c.f. the ARB, which admittedly is over 10 yrs old. Forewent the Max Air which has appeal for the regular traveller/user - the extra duty cycle & volume was worth the extra $'s, I felt. Even tho' I spent about twice what a Max Air would cost, I thought it might be difficult to plumb two max airs into one battery/engine running, and into one tyre valve.

Moral of the story - scouts motto - BP - be prepared. No tyres = no travel = frustration. All can be avoided with proper planning, vigilance & protocols.

Cheers

Rick.
AnswerID: 114175

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:31

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:31
The big weapon compressor would have been a bonus, no doubt, but hey, it's all good fun!

I had it easy, I was changing in the evening, with a little help from Jack Daniels.....

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Member - Captain (WA) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:07

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:07
Hi Guys,

A liitle trick I learnt many years ago was to carry a length of hose with two valve connectors on each end. First you pump up to ~60+ psi a GOOD tyre. This is now used as a high pressure air tank. Then you connect the high pressure "tank" to the tyre needing seating via the hose and you have a high volume of air to seat the tyre. Once seated, simply pump up via the compressor (can take a few goes while working out the best way to minimise the bead gap initially). Best if you use all the tricks like soapy water on the bead, compress the tyre to minimise the bead gap etc...

I have found this works well and also makes the size of the compressor irrelevant, just takes longer to fill the tyre "tank".

Cheers

Captain
Its not what you drive, but how you drive it!
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Follow Up By: old-plodder - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:35

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:35
Thnaks for the story, and honesty about the problems :-).
What I like about this forum, a chance to learn from each other.

I was wondering about the reseating of the tyres too.
Was thinking about a reservoir rather than a larger capacity pump.
What I used to do for ar compressor installations to cope with sudden short loads.
But the idea of using another tyre is also a good one.
Quick calc and a 235/85/16 is about 80 litres at atmosphere.
At 2 atmospheres (28 psi), would be about 160 litres?

Unless of course you have done in all your spares that day :-)
Then you resort to a good tyre on the car?

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Follow Up By: old-plodder - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 12:47

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 12:47
Follow up.

Mentioned this to a friend, whose father used to have a garage out west, and for most tyres, including truck tires, he usd to use a rope around the circumference of the tyre. Put a stik hrough and wound it up.
By deforming the tread by pulling it in, the wall and bead used to pop out and seat on the rim. Plenty of soap too.
Not sure if it would work with steel belted radials, worked OK with cross plies.
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:42

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:42
Yes, old plodder,
that does work...........sometimes. It certainly worked on that trip for me.........once or twice. Actually I had two staps wrenched down to make it all happen on steel belted radials.
With another tyre I tried & tried , but to no avail.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:05

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:05
Just reinforces that in tough tyre country there is no substitute for cross plys and split rims
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Reply By: motherhen - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 00:00

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 00:00
Glad to hear you're safely back and thanks for the "diary". Len Beadell would have been proud of you. How would he have coped with all those punctures? 3 days alcohol free? Shame about the iced coffee - what brands were so bad (must have been some of those brands imported from those foreign states in the East)? I don't touch the stuff, but my husband found some pretty foul brands in SA. I'll have to remember Brew's advice next time. Willem, Judith and friends are going to head up (is that one the Connie Sue?) to Warburton when they leave SW.

As soon as you can, so post some of your photos for us. Do you know you can now put them into the body of you post?

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:32

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:32
"I don't touch the stuff, but my husband found some pretty foul brands in SA."

I think they must have been NSW brands, that slipped over the border!!!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: motherhen - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 21:48

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 21:48
Sure must have been - like the stuff you were inflicted with in Eastern WA!
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 01:17

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 01:17
Agree with the rest Ian, Great read I enjoyed it also.

Just interested in the brands and models of tyres used by all and the location of the various punctures.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:37

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:37
John.....

All the puncture, all of them, were side wall stakes.... except for the scissors.....

Funny thing..... when I was repairing that one, Connie was sitting with me, and I opened the little tube of solvent, and the tube of glue with them, and when I was finished, I put them in the tyre repair kit!!!

Were ran Mickey Thompson Dick Cepeks, at around 33 psi.
Tour people had Cooper STT pressures unknown.
Other Nissan had Cooper ST pressure 33 psi.
Hilux.... can't remember.
Troopy.... again.... cant remember.

Too much Bourbon methinks.......

Wolfie
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Reply By: Troll83 - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 07:08

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 07:08
Sounds like so much fun....great read.
AnswerID: 114187

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:37

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:37
Thanks Troll83.

Wolfie
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Reply By: Member - RockyOne - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:25

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:25
Great read mate..Well done..Tad jealous though..Every day is one closer to my next adventure..Hey ! Just a question..I have read somewhere they seat the tyre by squirting some gas in & lite it up to seat the tyre..Would want to be a bit careful on this one..Anyone done it (and lived) ?
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AnswerID: 114194

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:41

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 08:41
"hey seat the tyre by squirting some gas in & lite it up to seat the tyre."

Whoa!!!! I am soooo much going to have to try that...... that is the most uber cool thing I HAVE SEEN FOR AGES!!!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:47

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:47
Have seen it done a few times..

It works well but could be dangerous if you used to much start ya bastard... its a real old trick, theres actually vid's of it done on some of the Iceland truck sites.
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FollowupID: 370197

Reply By: Footloose - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 09:28

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 09:28
Thanks for a great read. My experience has been that there are two main causes of problems in the bush, tyres and electricals. I've never found changing tyres to be fun, so I run Kellys 10ply LT's. Not very sexy looking , but they work well in the bush on splitties. Current cost is around $220 ea.
Another tip is to buy new glue for your tyre repair kit before you go. Nothing worse than having all the gear ready to fix your tyre and finding the glue is old and dry. (Like me :)
AnswerID: 114201

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:34

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:34
The glue thing is spot on, the lid never seemed to want to screw on properly, so I reckon it will be dry in a month or so. I also heard that you can increase the shelf life of the patches, by keeping them in a freezer.

Wouldn't want to get them mixed up with my tucker though.....

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:37

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:37
Your liquid diet :)) I din't know that patches have a shelf life ? Oh oh....more to buy.
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FollowupID: 370221

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 10:18

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 10:18
The "TOUR OPERATOR" didnt have a compressor that would seat a bead? :o they have never had to before?

Also the 'new' STT's have been out for a while now.. thats the first real report on them in the bush... dont sound too flash, but then again, most sound like they suffered.
AnswerID: 114206

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:36

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:36
Not sure if they have had the need, as they were surprised themselves, that it wouldn't seal.

You are right about the STT's being out for a while. I was under the impression that they were still being tested, prior to release, only to find, upon my return, that they are already for sale. Yes, I think all tyres suffered the same, right across the board.

Cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 370220

Reply By: Wombat - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:17

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 11:17
Great read Wolfie. It sounds like it lived up to your lofty expectations. With the benefit of hindsight, do you think the Delica would have been able to handle the rough going?
AnswerID: 114214

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:39

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:39
Yes, the Delica would have coped quite well, but it would have certainly had a few more rattles & dents by now. The Toyotas & Nissans are simply..... built heavier, and take the abuse easier. There was nowhere that was overly tricky as far as access, it was simply the state of the tracks, which caused things to break.

Cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 370222

Reply By: Member - Crazie (VIC) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 15:19

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 15:19
Hi Wolfie

Great read and sounds like a fantastic trip. By the sounds of it your are the master of the tyrepliers hahaha

good to hear you are all home safe as well

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AnswerID: 114238

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:41

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 16:41
One thing I will do, before my next sortie, is try to source the hooked Dowidat levers, they are much better than the supplied levers with the Tyre Pliers kit. The hook makes for quicker replacement of the tyre, almost all the way back on the rim.

Cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 370224

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 20:40

Friday, Jun 03, 2005 at 20:40
Great work Wolfie!!

I've travelled the Great Vic Desert each year for the last 3 years - beautiful place.

I'm surprised your trip leader wasn't into tyre plugs - sounds like he wanted you to do it the way Len had to :-))

When we did the Madigan Line across the Simpson last year, the leader plugged all the staked tyres - about 10 of them, and all on the vehicle without jacking or removing a tyre. Sometimes you need a couple of plugs in the hole, sometimes you get caught out by a tyre with two holes. And his advice to us was that we need not bother with spare tubes.

We did the trip from the Coober Pedy end last year, and I ran 17psi to keep the vehicle in one piece. Smoothed out the ride a touch.

Cheers
phil

AnswerID: 114279

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 14:11

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 14:11
The Great vic Desert is a magical place, no doubt. The Marble Gums are one thing I will always like, as well as the desert Oaks, when you move up north, sometimes the groves are as big as a small forest.

I will return, I am sure....

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: signman - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 13:06

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 13:06
Top story Wolfie
What is the location of Camera C?? I am aware of the Stones near the dingo fence- and other ' secrets' on the Ann Beadell- Connie sue- Old Gunbarrel?? We are off on July 16th and will be puttin a few spare tubes in too.
Wot did ya think of Beakaways and Painted Desert?? Quite spectacular & bet the camera got a work out.. Did ya go thru Lollipop Lane- where all the native trees look like ChuppaChups.
Also- OPAL fuel at Warburton??? and did ya notice it anywhere else??
Thanks
Signman
(and are you a signie too??)
AnswerID: 114339

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 14:05

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 14:05
Camera "C" is on the main track, can't miss it. The Stonehenge job you can't get access to any more.

Breakaways were good, but Painted Desert is waaaay better. Yes, Lollipop Lane.... and the Moonscape.

Opal is at Warburton & Warakurna. Didn't bother looking at Kalka & Amata.

I supply Signwriters with all of their steelwork, like Signwhite, A Frames, Pylons, Illuminated...etc.....

Cheers

Wolfie
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Reply By: Troopy Travellers (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 06:13

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 06:13
Enjoyed your story Wolfie, hope you remember to link us to your photos when you have them up. Carolyn
AnswerID: 114401

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:22

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:22
Thanks Carolyn.

I have spent most of Saturday going through some piccies, and burning 10 CD's to send out to my fellow travellers.

I will set up my new site one day, when I get some more time....

Cheers

Wolfie

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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:58

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:58
Wolfie,

Enjoyed your story, so printed it out, to re-read later.

Interesting about tyres, and re-seating. Have an 80 series with 8" rims, and BFG AT's in 265/75R16's. Can remove and refit one of these, on the rim, in about 10 minutes, then spend another 45 mins getting the beads reseated. Have tried the rope around the centre of the tyre, to no effect.

Have found the best situation, time permitting, is to fit a tube to the tyre, before fitting to rim, and blow it up, to spread the beads apart. Hours, or days later, the beads fit much better, and are easier to seat. And plenty of lube!!!!

Captain's idea of using a spare to act as storage is a good one, as most success comes when one can "dump" the air into the tyre. We have an air tank I purchased for reseating truck tyres, it's a tank about 15-20 L, with 2" outlet, and a ball valve, and a flattened spout. Fit it to the bead of rim, and the sudden rush of air swells the tyre, to pop onto the bead. Bit bulky for 4WD's though.

Think we'll be carrying tubes, on our big trip, Wolfie. Thanks,

Hooroo...
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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AnswerID: 114416

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 11:47

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 11:47
"Enjoyed your story, so printed it out, to re-read later. "

Careful.... I'm starting to blush!!!!

Yes, I also tried the 2 layers of rope around the tyre, and twisted them, until the tyre was.... well..... very deformed.

I do admit, I like the idea of using a second spare, or other vehicle tyre, as a rush of air. Tubes won out in the end, and two of the repairs I had effected, would have been useless, if it were not for tubes.

Cheers

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:50

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:50
"...starting to blush"

Hey, don't get tickets on yourself, Wolfie, I'm a slow reader.

Anyway, only buttering you up, so that you put up some of those photos.

Hooroo....
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:52

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:52
Hi Bob,

I've had the same hassles as you with the 8 inch rims. I run 265's on 16x7 rims - they inflate a lot easier.

The rope trick used to work in the past, but I've found the tyres these days distort too much - hard tread and soft sidewall. Better trick I think is to carry a 16inch pushbike tube and slip it between bead and rim (+ plenty of lube) to hold the air in.

As far as air tanks go, I inflate a spare to 80psi and use a 3 way conector in my pump. The pump is keeping the pressure up and refills it if I'm not successful. If you want a good gush of air, removing the valves helps.

Cheers
phil
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FollowupID: 370391

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:46

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:46
Now, this pushbike tube thingy..... I can see the merit, and I am all excited about this new idea, but... what happens if it gets locked & pinched in the bead?

Cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 370400

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:53

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:53
Wolfie,

Tyre dealers use a proper version of it that has the valve on the outside, but you can use a 16" bike tube with the valve turned out. It won't get stuck in there - it gets pushed out easily, but it usually keeps the air in enough to get some pressure in the casing and force the tyre beads onto the safety rim's hump and get a seal. I've played around with them, and always carry one, but never had to use it in anger.

265's reinflate very easily on 7 inch rims. Your problem was that the Nissan had 8 inch rims.

Cheers
phil
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FollowupID: 370401

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:55

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:55
Wolfie,

When the pushbike tube does that, Bob generally does the "lolly"!!!

Echo your findings on the rope around the tyre trick, Phil. Tyre fitter in Winton showed me the 'bike tube trick, and usually end up using it, if the expanded tyre method doesn't work.

Good idea with the tee piece on the spare Phil. Was thinking of a similar method, though without the tee, and a ball valve in line, so the air could be "dumped" without the valve in place.

Have a grader with tubeless tyres, that can cause some problems with sealing. However, they use an "O" ring to achieve sealing, don't appear to like any lube, oh, and they are as heavy as buggery, to handle.

Great weather up here at moment, Phil, you can expect same for trip up/down the Hay. Have been keeping track on you & 79 series, on 70s Cool.

Regards....
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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FollowupID: 370402

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 09:08

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 09:08
Hi Bob,

Good to hear from you. Can't wait to head north at the end of the month. Got the permissions back last week, the truck has had a few more bits fitted to keep the wife happy, so we're close to being set. Give it a trial run in the Flinders this weekend.

I'll upload some more photos to 70scool - my 6 photos here are all "locked" from being used in posts.

Thanks for he grader info - I just assumed the lube was needed, next time I inflate an 8 inch Cruiser tyre I'll try it out.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 370403

Reply By: Nudenut - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:32

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:32
great read Ian,
but,
Whats a “donkey lit”

“there is still no tangible reason as to why, and who laid these stones”..probably willem!

“not consume any alcohol whilst in transit of these lands” not going on that trip…. “which will be for the next three days” man is not a camel!!
AnswerID: 114508

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:43

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:43
A donkey lit......

A donkey, is simply 1 or 2 44 gallon drums laid on their side, over a fire, and enclosed on a metal outer skin. The drums are then plumbed to an overhead tank of sorts, whilst the hot water outlet goes to the shower, kitchen, whatever. Also, on the hot water outlet, if the overhead tank is say... more than a few hundred metres away, you will have a breather pipe, which is higher than the overhead tank, to let expanded water out.

The stones are quite interesting, and I have managed to get some nice close up shots. The laying is intricate, but the line itself is crooked.... maybe whoever did it was on the p!ss!!!!

Cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 370399

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