Bush medical treatments

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 10:54
ThreadID: 30772 Views:3234 Replies:23 FollowUps:13
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Ever been a long way from a chemist and had a toe burned in the fire ? A toothache ? An earache ? Sprain, etc? Zapped into the first aid box and.....there's nothing that seems to cover it ?
As we get older our medical kits get bigger. But never , it seems, big enough.
Some medicines are safe to use in the short term for more than one application. An interesting one was Anusol for small burns.
Obviously you get appropriate qualified medical attention asap. But have you found a multi use medication that could be used short term in an emergency ? (Not ink a hol :)
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Reply By: Shaker - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:03

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:03
I think what you are looking for would have been refered to in the old days as ..... Snake Oil!

But seriously, you have raised a good point, I really don't think there is any general remedy for that big a range of problems.
It certainly can be a worry, especially for those with children, to be in a remote situation with no immediate access to medical aid.
Ther are quite a few potions that claim to help various complaints, like Rawleighs Ointment "For man or Beast" & Tiger Balm etc.
Good luck in your search!
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Reply By: ImEasy - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:06

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:06
I suppose the Anusol would help in the burning pain, and relieve the itching in the healing process?
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Follow Up By: D-Jack - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 16:54

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 16:54
Especially if you happened to get a burn or cut on your ANUS!
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Reply By: madcow - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:20

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:20
Clove oil for the toothache, I'd love to know how the toe got burnt. Bit of outback shenanigans?? :)). Not much you can do for an earache except find the most comfortable position and maybe a couple of aspro etc.
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Reply By: Member - bushfix - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:56

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 11:56
!MPG:5!
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 12:50

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 12:50
Earache - I always have some antibiotics and Panadol

Burns - plenty of ice, plus I carry Melaluca (???) honey to treat it with. Stops germs and reduces scarring. I believe Ti Tree Honey is either the same thing or just as good.

Toothache - clove oil/Panadol.

Sprain - bandages. I also have a Sam Splint (available online here at Exporoz) for breaks.

I don't think, apart from the Snake Oil, that there is a "one dose cures all" remedy available. If there is, I will get some.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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AnswerID: 154892

Reply By: Jodi - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 12:56

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 12:56
About 5 weeks ago I had the misfortune to take the fast track down a flight of stairs hidden by sand whilst camping. Tore all ligaments in ankle and now booked in for a scan to see if there are any remaining fractures. This was the first time we have needed any real first aid whilst camping. First Aid kit provided bandages, however as we had the Engle we discovered we had NO ICE. The bladder out of a wine cask served perfectly and was close by for the top up pain killers until we got medical attention.

I also discovered that camp chairs turned around to face you work wonders as a walking frame to take the weight off, and once camp site is packed up and you're on your way out - tent poles work magic as improvised crutches...

No medication available to fix the curious stares I received hobbling along with my 'crutches' for toilet stops during our 4 hour drive back to civilisation and a hospital.
AnswerID: 154893

Follow Up By: Member - Darren T (VIC) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:26

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:26
My girlfriend had bought a First Aid kit from the Red Cross after doing her certificate. It is specifically designed for travelling and in it has an instant ice pack. I`d never seen one before and don`t know how it really works but its pretty much like the fishing glo sticks, bend it in half to crack the inside and shake. Becomes an Ice pack instantly.
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Follow Up By: Jodi - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:29

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:29
Hi Darren,
I used to play a lot of netball and had need for an icepack on a few occasions (for the same bl**dy ankle). The netball centre always had the type of pack you mentioned. I knew they existed but never knew where to get one - now I know and will be adding a couple to our first aid kit.
Thanks
jodi
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:03

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:03
Bugger the first aid kit.

I'm going to get some in case I can't keep the fridge cold.
Bill


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Reply By: Member - Bware - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:09

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:09
My wife has studied aromatherapy and essential oils and now we take Lavender and Chamomile everywhere. Probably not good for burns but not many things are. Lavender is a natural antiseptic like Teatree and Eucalyptus, and also relieves the itch from stings almost immediately. Chamomile is great for skin conditions in general like heat/sweat rash. Aloe Vera is great for healing the skin, sunburn and can be applied to burns in it's natural form(straight from the plant) to sooth and reduce blistering and scarring.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bware - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:11

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:11
Oh yeah, plus they're all natural and safe for kids
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Reply By: Pterosaur - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:10

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:10
Cloves work fairly well for toothache (chew, suck 2-3 over affected tooth) for pain relief if you don't have clove oil.

Cold (preferably running) water is the best treatment for burns - or swirl burnt bit in cold water - important to keep it up until no burning sensation is felt upon removal of the affected bit - bit hard to do with some bodily areas, or if there's not much water available - improvisation is the key - with the aim to cool down the affected areas so that internal "cooking" does not continue.

I've also used (successfully) cold wet cloth for the same purpose where water is not plentiful - just keep some water in your fridge, recycle cloth often (use 2 or 3), until burning pain stops. Was at a camp once where one of my mates slipped and put his hand into a wok with about 2'' of boiling oil - made him stick his hand in the temp-rite we had (for the keg) for a couple of hours, and swirl it about - result not a mark on his hand.

Charcoal tablets are pretty good for upset stomach, and may also help a bit with food poisoning.

Electrolyte drinks (I always carry powdered forms) are good for dehydration from vomiting or other causes.

A couple of drops of onion (or garlic) juice (both are mildly antibiotic) in a sore ear can help (and sometimes cure) an earache. Ti-tree oil might work too, but I haven't tried sticking it in anyone's ear yet - but it is another very effective antibacterial agent - useful on infected wounds, boils etc., and I always carry some in my kit.

I reckon the ti-tree oil is the most used stuff I carry, as I do a fair bit of fishing when I can, and it's great for the little nicks, punctures and scratches which seem to go with the territory, and are so prone to getting infected (esp. in the tropics).
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Reply By: Footloose - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:28

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 13:28
Many thanks to those who've responded so far. I know that you've given me food for thought, and I sincerely hope that it has done the same for others.
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Reply By: Member - Tony G (ACT) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 14:36

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 14:36
There is a poduct called "QUICK-COLD" Instant Ice Compress. No refrigeration needed but when the contents are mixed together produces cold tempetures.

Also a pack of frozen peas does a good job as well.
AnswerID: 154909

Reply By: Leonora - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 15:59

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 15:59
nothing like a good first aid course and regular updates, try State Training Services website re a remote area certificate
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Reply By: Howard T - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 16:07

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 16:07
Hi
Probably not in the first aid category but a couple of months ago I cut myself, not badly but bled like a cut snake. Go to the first aid kit for a bandaid or 2 and guess what ...none there.
Good old mother in law was there (85yo). told me to put some pepper on it. Yeah right! shes just trying to get back at me but did what I was told and did what I was told. Stung a bit but the bleeding stopped almost immediately.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:59

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 17:59
Toothache?...........Piece of fishing line around the tooth, then tie other end to your snatch strap. The rest of the procedure as per normal snatch recovery.
Bill


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AnswerID: 154941

Reply By: hoyks - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:18

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:18
Raw honey makes a good topical antibiotic.
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Reply By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:23

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:23
Hi Footloose,

I carry a tube/tub of Lucas' Paw Paw ointment it seems to cure every skin problem known to man or woman..:) including boils, burns, insect bites, cracked skin, chaffing, nappy rash etc, no good for toothache though.

Seriously, this stuff is really great, it was prescribed to my dad when he was having chemotherapy and his skin reacted really badly to the treatment and it cleared it up very quickly, I have since used it myself and the kids use it for "itchy bites"...well worth the investment.

cheers

Lyn
AnswerID: 154948

Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:59

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:59
And, Maaaa, when the tiddlies grow up a bit and become teenagers with spots and zits on their little sweet faces, they can put the PawPaw ointment on and make them beautiful again (I know) - we didn't have Clearasil. I didn't realise it was still available. I thought Mum used to buy it from the Rawlings man - like a door to door salesman - sold Coconut Shampoo also.
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Follow Up By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 13:35

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 13:35
I remember the Rawlings man too....he had all sorts of potions...
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Reply By: revhead307 - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:43

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 18:43
I'd rather have a toothache...I hate cloves..

Rev
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Reply By: Mike DiD - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 19:52

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 19:52
Go to a Healthfood store and get a jar of Rosa Scarless Healer. A thick cream that works wonders for all sorts of skin ailments.

Mike
AnswerID: 154970

Reply By: Spinifex - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:09

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:09
Whiskey works wonders as a painkiller.

Have pulled a number of teeth out bush with fencing pliers. Half a bottle of scotch and you don't feel a thing.

Almost!!!!
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Reply By: Mr Fawlty - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:11

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:11
for earache of external origin try a few drops equal parts vinegar & metho in the ear...
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Reply By: Dave198 - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:12

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 20:12
I, like many others I am sure, are getting many great ideas from this site. One thing that I feel many of you would have seen is the RFDS medicine chest. Most outback properties have one of these medical chests in the homestead, and they are there for anybody to use in emergencies,including travellers.
So if you have any serious problem, I am sure if you contact the nearest homestead, they probably will have a medical chest. You could potentially ring and speak to the Flying Doctor to get the most appropriated advice at the same time.
I feel sure no-one will abuse the use of this system, as we all should have a good first aid kit and some training to utilise it, but the RFDS medical kit is stocked by the RFDS for people in medical emergencies in the outback.
Next time you pass a RFDS tin, drop a few coins in too. You never know when you may need them.
Dave
AnswerID: 154978

Follow Up By: jdpatrol - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:06

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:06
I heard how good the RFDS kit was and told a mate. He tried to get it a few months ago - rang RFDS and they didnt know anything about it??

Does anyone know where to get it?

JD
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Reply By: Trevor M (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 22:17

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 22:17
I am now a lot more careful than perhaps I once was.

A few months ago camping on the Murray I tripped into the (substantial) fire we had going and was lucky someone pulled me out with only my left hand sinking deep into the coals. Yes a few (read many) wines had been had.

River was close for soaking and luckily one of the party was sober enough to drive me the 1/2 hour to the nearest hospital. Still serious and many months to recover but no permanent damage.

It did make me think however that the same thing could easily have happenned on one of our trips not so close to civilisation and it is a sobering thought what you would do if a hospital (or any support) is days away.

I am now much more aware! (which is not a bad thing)

Trev
AnswerID: 155013

Reply By: ev700 - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 23:24

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2006 at 23:24
TrevorM's post reminded me of an accident that happened to my father.

He had burned off some big tree stumps that were not removed by the dozer.

When we returned nearly a week later he was striding through white ashes when suddenly he plummeted down a hole which was filled at the bottom with burning coals. He was a tall, strong man and was lucky to scramble out, but he sufferd terrible burns up his shins. His boots had caught fire too.

We had a basic first aid kit but only used water from the 20 gallons that we always carried in the truck, with his legs on a canvas tarp and shaded with a shirt. We were lucky this property was not too far from a country hospital. After some months of pain he eventually regained mobility.

Shock was the biggest worry.

I am constantly reminded of his accident when I venture into land that has been crossed by fire. The fire pit he fell into was only obvious (in hindsight) as a small depression and there was no tell-tale smoke.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:39

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:39
I probably shouldn't post this on a forum, but I know you guys will keep it to yourselves :-))
Superglue can be used for repairing lacerations. We use a proper medical version at work, but prior to that becoming available, any old superglue was used in the past. Naturally, you need to firstly clean out and flush out the wound, and stop the bleeding, but a small drop or two of superglue and some gentle pressure for 30seconds to hold it together, may be a good trick to use when you're out on the Madigan Line and many days away from civilisation.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 155135

Follow Up By: Footloose - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:47

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 12:47
Phil, that's not only amazing but frightening. I can imagine waking up on the op table just as the surgeon calls for "another 2 drops of super glue over here please nurse". Crikey ! I learn something new every day.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:19

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:19
Hi Footloose, yeah, without stitches they reckon its better cosmetically, but I reckon the guys that use it are just bone lazy :-)))

Anyway, the most important person in the theatre - the anaesthetist - would usually keep you asleep until after the superglue is in :-))
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:32

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:32
Phil, I agree. I was being zoomed down to theatre and asked if I was going to meet the anaesthetist. I was assured I was. Just then a young sweet thing popped her head over the rail and said hello. "Are you the anaesthetist ? " I ask hopefully. "No she's my assistant" growls a face as ugly as me. We recognize each other but don't know where from...not a great feeling I can tell you.
In recovery I suddenly wake up and see everyone leaving theatre. Apparently I was the last for the avo, "and we're off to the pub" says ugly's assistant. "Not without me" I tell em all, winking at the assistant.
Needless to say, instead of a couple of days r@r in hospital they sent me home a couple of hours later.
And they told me not to come back. Some people are so cruel :))
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:46

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 21:46
hehehehe
Must have been Friday afternoon.... We usually crack open a red for "team building"

Sorry to hear you missed out on the R&R - there was a study years ago that showed the longer you hang around in hospital, the more likely it was that you'd get ill..............
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Follow Up By: AdrianLR (VIC) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 23:52

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2006 at 23:52
We were near Darwin a few years ago and our then 5 year old split his chin open. Luckily we were with my sister-in-law who's a Doctor and there was a Woolworths on the way back into town. A quick clean, a few drops of glue and gently squeeze for 5 minutes. It would have required stiches and much more drama if we'd taken him to a clinic. No scarring at all now.

The 5-packs of the 3ml tubes are ideal.

Adrian
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