Yest another post...Iridium emergency number?

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:33
ThreadID: 54180 Views:3210 Replies:6 FollowUps:22
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I've searched and searched the forum for an answer to this one but I think I got lost in the number of posts!

AFAIK Iridium does not connect to "000" when using an Iridium Sim card. Do they connect when using a Telstra Next oh gee card ?

In fact when using the Iridium network, can you phone "000" by putting in the +61. ?

Chatting to an American crowd who provide Iridium pre paid and they muffined on about this mob and that, nothing with any obvious relevance to Australian operation.

There again, I may have it all upside down, as usual.
TIA
Footy
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Reply By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:37

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:37
The # is 112 this is an international emergency #

Cheers Steve.
AnswerID: 285313

Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:42

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:42
Thanks Steve.
"The # is 112 " So presumeably they re route the call ? I'm a bit worried that my emergency call could end up in an Indian call centre :))
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Follow Up By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:46

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:46
Don't be to worried if you dial ooo in the Northern Territory you get some one in Adalaide.

Cheers Steve.
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:50

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:50
Yes, but if you dial 112 on the NT , do you get Bombay ? LOL
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:58

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:58
There are only two "000" Emergency Services Answering Points in Australia, with Telstra Operators in Sydney or Melbourne.

Depending on whether you ask for Police, Fire or Ambulance, you will then be connected to that service based on your location. It could be a communications center or it could be a Police Station. Telstra has no control over where they pass the call to - they follow the guidelines given by the three services.
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Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:49

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 12:49
If you use a Telstra SIM card in a Motorola 9500/9505 then dialling 000 will connect you to the Emergency Services Answering Points in Sydney or Melbourne. I have tested it.

If you dial 112 when you have an Iridium SIMcard you will be connected to an Iridium operator in ???? who may be able to connect you to emergency services in Australia.
AnswerID: 285317

Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:17

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:17
Thanks Mike. What worries me is the (expensive) time that COULD be lost as they try and practise their English.
I guess its a gamble that you will be able to understand them and they will be able to assist you.
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Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:00

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:00
I wouldn't worry too much about the "expensive" time in dollar terms Jim, what I would worry about in my line of work is that the patient could worsen significantly before you get connected to help. That's "expensive".

Dave
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:06

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:06
I would just flick the switch on my EPIRB, after all we are talking about an emergency situation.


Bill


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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:13

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:13
And if you don't need to be assisted, but you have dead and dying bodies around you ? What if it's someone else's accident? No way is an EPIRB going to help in that situation!
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:18

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:18
"I would just flick the switch on my EPIRB, after all we are talking about an emergency situation"

- and then you'll just sit there drinking a beer for many hours, while people around you are dying needllessly - when you could be getting instant advice from a doctor on how to treat the heart attack / injury / bite ???
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Follow Up By: Footloose - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:21

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:21
Sandman, perhaps I missed something in your post? You were being serious, weren't you ?
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:47

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:47
Yes Footy, I'm being serious.

If I ever find myself involved in a life threatening situation either to one of my party, or I come across someone else in a similar situation, I would have no hesitation in activating the EPIRP.
That is what it is for and I wouldn't bother trying to ring someone and explain where I am so help could be summoned.


Mike,
That was a bloody silly comment.
I have a reasonable knowledge of first aid and can cope with most situations. Whether I could potentially save someone's life by speaking to a Doctor....who knows. In a heart attack situation you need a little more support than just verbal advice.
And if the snake bite was from a particularly venomous species, only an antivenine would help.

I chose the 406Mhz EPIRB over both a satellite phone, or HF transceiver, because it fits my budget better and I believe an EPIRB would get help as quick as any other option.

That's my choice.......Each to their own!!!


Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 07:50

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 07:50
"I have a reasonable knowledge of first aid and can cope with most situations. "
- I feel sorry for anyone who will depend on being treated by you, if you believe YOUR knowledge on the best way to a treat a particular situation, is EQUAL TO an Emergency Dept doctor.

"I chose the 406Mhz EPIRB over both a satellite phone, or HF transceiver, because it fits my budget better."
- but you didn't explain in your initial post you were talking about ONLY having an EPIRB with you. It read like you would ONLY set off the EPIRB even if you had other choices. We can only read what you wrote, not what you meant.

"I believe an EPIRB would get help as quick as any other option."
- As you're a regular here, I think we assumed that you know better than this from all the posts about EPIRBs.


That's my choice.......Each to their own!!!"
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 15:08

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 15:08
Mike,

I think you are perhaps ignorant of the new 406Mhz technology and simply "flaming" the issue for whatever reason you may have.

There is virtually no information or first hand experience on the 406Mhz EPIRB (at least on land) as they are new to market, but indications from marine use is they are much quicker to transmit an emergency signal to monitoring stations and much more accurate for rescue services to respond. (GPS equipped model)

Along with the personal details already registered with the authorities, I'll take my chances that they will prove to be an appropriate and worthwhile piece of emergency equipment.

Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:06

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:06
"I think you are perhaps ignorant of the new 406Mhz technology and simply "flaming" the issue for whatever reason you may have."
- the only reason I spend a lot of time writing on these topics is so that readers here are well prepared to handle emergencies in their outback travels. Thirty years in emergency services has made it very clear that well-informed preparation can make the difference between a nuisance and a disaster.



"There is virtually no information or first hand experience on the 406Mhz EPIRB (at least on land) as they are new to market, but indications from marine use is they are much quicker to transmit an emergency signal to monitoring stations and much more accurate for rescue services to respond. (GPS equipped model) "
- Let's go through the steps
1. You activate the GPS EPIRB.
2. NOTHING happens until the next satellite passes overhead, then the EPIRB position and ID are reported to the national centre
3. A decision is made on the best way to find out what the emergency maybe - e.g. send out a light aircraft. The emergency maybe illness, injury, stranding etc
4. The aircraft arrives overhead and your need is assessed.
5. Plans are made to send the required assistance.

Alternately if you contact Emergency Services by Satphone or HF radio, you tell them exactly the number of people affected and the situation and a discussion with doctors will ensure the best possible action is taken with the resources available at the incident. You advise them with current local knowledge of how to access the incident site. Rescue plans are made for the specific needs of the survivors.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:15

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 18:15
To summarise -

I agree that a GPS 406 EPIRB will get a faster rescue than a non-GPS 406 EPIRB, and much faster than a 121 EPIRB.

But being able to contact Emergency services directly by Satphone or HF radio, will get life-saving results for the survivors even faster.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 21:16

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 21:16
Yeh, right Mike.

That is, IF you can tell them where you are, which introduces the need for a working GPS as well as your Satphone.

Oh! And the light aircraft you speak of.
All aircraft have UHF transceivers, so when they are within visual range, they are also well within UHF range.

Thanks for your valuable input Mike.

Bill


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Follow Up By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 23:49

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 23:49
So I have just rolled my car and camper, on the Strzelekei as we all survived with little injuries, we just need water and a tow truck.

What is better a Sat phone to tell the authorities what we need or an EPIRB that sets of an expensive search and rescue that is not warranted, by the way at the same time on the Oodnadatta track Fritz in his britz is in need of a search and rescue but they are looking for me instead.

Now both these devices have there use it's using it right that counts.

As for the question what is the # you call, once again it's 112.

Cheers Steve.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:04

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:04
Come on get off he's back..

he explained he's reason (right or wrong), as some may see...

"rolled my car and camper, on the Strzelekei as we all survived with little injuries, we just need water and a tow truck."


emergency situation.

So Fritz (bad word) can wait..

Regards

Richard



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Follow Up By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:11

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:11
Richard

WHAT THE ??

I made my point simple and clear.

It was to show that some times there needed and sometimes there not.

A blind man on a galloping horse can see that.

Why is Fritz a bad word my wife (being German) has an uncle called Fritz.

Cheers Steve.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:27

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:27
Hi Steve

I didn't use your name for a reason, because it was a generalisation.. ha ha (spell check got me that).

Richard is a German Word/name. is my name but I'm not German,

my mother thinks that britz camper are for the British travelers .. LOL..

Cool..

Richard
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Follow Up By: Steve from Top End Explorer Tours - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:36

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 00:36
If jumped the gun then I apologize.

The first Britz camper was made in a back yard by a German fella, It is now owned by Maui (spelling) being a New Zealand Mob.

Cheers Steve.
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Reply By: Member - LOS BUSH - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:45

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:45
I have the RFD as my # 1 call out on my Iridium network phone ,works fine
All the best LOS
AnswerID: 285334

Reply By: aroundwego - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 23:31

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 23:31
Hi,

I cant answer the original question about what number to call, but I have a first hand knowledge of the epirb system, - if you let one off and I’m on shift I will be the one on the other end.

To answer or comment n some of the points raised.

If you have a 406 and you register it, then if you set it off we will call you. The stationary satellites will detect it and pass on your unique code. That process should take under 10 or so minutes. The code is compared to database and your contact details are accessed. So the first thing that will happen is that the RCC will call you. If you don’t answer they will call your nominated contacts.

If you have the GPS equipped unit, your posn is also received. If you dont have the GPS one, the RCC has to wait for an orbiting satellite to pass and detect your beacon. So this would give off two posn's. But if the RCC called you or your nominated contacts and they said you were on the Birdsville track, you can guess where the search is going to start.

If you answer the phone you can pass on all the details and they would then be dealt with in the best way.

In the case where you couldn’t work out what the emergency number is: I would suggest calling someone you know and get them to pass on details to emergency services, and give them your number to call you back. I suppose if you had a 406 epirb, you could activate it and someone would call you (as long as tour details are up to date), or respond as mentioned earlier

Regarding 406 first hand experiences, there is actually a lot. Probably at least one or two are detected and processed by the RCC each day. Most are accidental, and the first phone call resolves it. If it is real it is generally much quicker to respond to and the response is better prepared. Because the RCC will have a much better idea of what the target is. In the last few months I have been involved in at least two 406 responses to 4WDs in the outback.

Personally, I think a sat phone provides a number of advantages. As mentioned you can call for a variety of reasons and seek assistance. Even like “I have staked all my tyres and need new ones”.

Regarding a comment about activating a beacon and it will be picked up by an aircraft, don’t rely on that. A couple of reasons: not all aircraft monitor 121.5, the majority of detections of 121.5 beacons are after the satellites has made the initial detection and the RCC then gets ATC to get aircraft to monitor the frequency in the probable areas. In 12 months time that capability will no longer exists, as the satellites will no longer detect the older beacons. Depending on where you are and the time of day there just aren’t any aircraft flying within that area.

The other thing is that passing aircraft may actually not detect it. Recently an older beacon was detected by satellite in the middle of the night. After two satellite passes it was isolated to Longreach. A number of aircraft flew passed that area, but didn’t detect it. A search aircraft with good homing gear flew out to Longreach, and narrowed it down to the local tip. It landed and with handheld gear they found the beacon. Interestingly during the plane’s return trip to Melbourne they detected another beacon and found a stranded family in a 4WD

I hope I haven’t bored you too much, sorry ;)

Pete
AnswerID: 285694

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 01:32

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 01:32
Some good, unemotional input Pete. Not boring at all.

To Mike and others.

At no time have I made negative comments about the practicalities of a satellite phone. Some of us just cannot justify the cost, whereas the EPIRB (even the 406 one with GPS) is within many peoples budget.

My point has been to readers that a quality 406 Mhz EPIRB is singularly the most important piece of survival equipment to have, IMO.

I bought mine to replace the old 121.5 Mhz unit because of the advantages it offers over the old technology and Pete has described that pretty well.



Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 07:33

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 07:33
Pete

Thanks for taking the time to educate everyone here on exactly how it works.

I've learnt a lot about the real practicalities of remote area travel via ExplorOz, and that's thanks to the enormous range of expertise of the people who contribute here.
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Reply By: Footloose - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:51

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:51
Many thanks to all who contributed. I now know that #112 is what I was after.
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