climbing ayres rock?

Submitted: Friday, May 15, 2009 at 11:55
ThreadID: 68851 Views:3180 Replies:10 FollowUps:18
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Greetings, heard a rumour that the rock has been permanently closed to the climb. I'm booked in to go there in July and was wondering if this is indeed the case or just people trying to put you off?
Cheers
Scott
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Reply By: Gronk - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 11:57

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 11:57
I don't think they could afford to stop people climbing !!

Tourist numbers would go down by half......
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Follow Up By: ozwasp - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 23:59

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 23:59
I doubt it... When I climbed it, only about 1 in 20 people seemed to go up

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Reply By: Ken - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:12

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:12
Scott, from time to time the climb is closed for a range of reasons not many of which make too much sense but include too hot, too windy. It is suggested that visitors don't climb the rock out of respect for 'cultural reasons' whatever that means. A large part of the attraction of visiting the rock is to climb it and I personally see little reason to not climb it.

And for all those who might carry on about respecting scared places how does climbing the rock differ from climbing the dome of St Pauls ?
Ken
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Follow Up By: Ferret - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:20

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:20
Cheers, I've climbed it twice, the last time was 4 years ago but my youngest daughter was two small at the time and we've been waiting til shes old enough to go back and climb it as a family. Wpould be pretty disappointed to find it has been closed permanently. I understand to hot/windy because I've been up there when there is a bit of a breeze and it can be quite unsettling.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: The Top End Explorer - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:32

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:32
It is suggested that visitors don't climb the rock out of respect for 'cultural reasons' whatever that means.

Well let me educate you,

The rock as a whole is not considered a sacred site, however there are areas of the rock that are, There is no direct cultural reason why you can't climb the rock, In Aboriginal culture they feel responsible for anyone being hurt or worse on their land, so Traditional owners feel that with all the people that have been hurt or killed climbing the rock it would be best to restrict access to it on days were it could become a danger for people to climb it, or suggest for your own safety you don't climb it at all.

It is there way of protecting the foolish from them selves, so if you want to and are more than capable of climbing it then go and climb it, if you aren't then respect the way the traditional owners would feel if you get hurt or worse.

I have been there twice and not climbed it yet my reason is I will do one day, probably when the young bloke is a bit older.

Cheers Steve.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 18:43

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 18:43
Not quite right there Steve.

It is fact that the traditional owners prefer that people don't climb the rock. However, they do not actually stop anyone from doing so, unless for reasons of safety and I suspect this is as much a requirement of the NT Government regulations as much as any "traditional" requirements.

When conditions such as strong winds or rain is present, the "caged" entry to the climb is locked, so that people cannot access the climbing route.

One of the reasons for this safety issue, is that there is a real danger to the rescue party who must climb the route to attempt the retrieval of some peckerhead who has found themself in severe difficulty.

Bill.
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Follow Up By: The Top End Explorer - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 22:23

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 22:23
Yeah it is a joint management between the traditional owners and Parks Australia North, there for the decision is probably a joint one, needless to say that my comments about how they feel if someone is hurt are correct, PAN are actually federal as apposed to Territory, they are the same mob who look after Kakadu.

Cheers`Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 10:00

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 10:00
Ken, let's try a more meaninful comparison. How would you feel about (say Japanese) tourists climbing up on war memorial statuies to have their photos taken at the top? Just look at the reaction of Australians to the roadworks at our "sacred site" in Turkey.
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Follow Up By: Ken - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 16:50

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 16:50
Well Mfewater if you reckon that's your idea of a meaningful comparison go for it. A couple of things though, our memorials are just that, structures created to recognise sacrifices. When was it that the rock was declared a memorial ? Never heard any indigenous people refer to it as a memorial. As for your nonsense about Gallipoli, nobody is upset about people walking about the place, its a bit different digging things up though wouldn't you say ?
You sound like one of the starry eyed apologists for everything involving indigenous people regardless of the facts of the matter.
Ken
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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 17:50

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 17:50
Gotta love that quick slide to the personal with the "starry eyed apologist for everything involving indigenous people".
It's not the 'walking about" that is the issue for the local people, it's the number of deaths that have occurred at a site they do not want to be marked by death. To you (and me), a "memorial to sacrifice" is an adequate reason to want a place treated with respect. But there can be many other reasons. You just have to respect other cultural perspectives as well as your own.
And if there seem to be a lot of indigenous sacred sites, give us time, they have had some 40,000 years to accumulate theirs so we have lots of time left for significant events to happen at lots of places so we can have a lot of sacred sites as well.
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Reply By: get outmore - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:37

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:37
if you think you will be disapointed if you cant climb it - wait till you do the base walk and cant photograph any of the natural formations

also dont bother visiting the multi million dollar cultural centre if sharing photos of your trip with freinds is high on your agenda
AnswerID: 365027

Follow Up By: Member - John - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 13:09

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 13:09
Please explain...........
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 13:37

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 13:37
No photos allowed of nearly every promanant feature around the base of the rock with signs threatening 10K fines either side of the feature along the base walk track and noPhotography allowed in the cultural centre.

That info was correct as of 2003 appologies if it has changed.

the only thing you can photo of any interest is a wave/cave feature
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:39

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 12:39
The locals "request" that you dont...


... but are happy to hold out their hand for the cash when you do..
AnswerID: 365028

Follow Up By: Krakka - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 12:06

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 12:06
Well summed up Truckie!!!!!

Krakka
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Reply By: Member - Tour Boy ( Bundy QLD) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 14:12

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 14:12
If I have to respect their belief to not take pics, they have to respect that I will still respect their site by taking pics. I have some great shots of "sacred" sites. I have worked with many indiginous people over the years doing tours and when push comes to shove they didn't really mind. If this wasn't the case there wouldn't be any painting pics or movies made by the Leyland Bros, Malcolm Douglas etc would there....
Maybe I'm just likable...lol
Cheers
Dave
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AnswerID: 365042

Reply By: Sigmund - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 14:48

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 14:48
Oh good, just what our indigenous people need: some pushing.
AnswerID: 365049

Follow Up By: Member - Matt M (ACT) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 15:53

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 15:53
If you want a straight answer contact Park Administration:

Ph (+61) 8 8956 1100
Fax (+61) 8 8956 2064

E-mail: uluru.admin@environment.gov.au

If you want to risk a 'hijack' and (heaven forbid) some alternate discussion, then post your question on a forum such as this.

No room on the soapbox, you're hogging it.

Matt.
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Follow Up By: Ferret - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 16:13

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 16:13
Thanks for the contact numbers, I just rang them and no its not closed permanently, just subject to the usual weather conditions.
Ta
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:15

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:15
Was open last week except for a windy period.
It costs no more to walk it.
Has a rope right up to near the top to hang on to
The $25 entry fee to the park covers it.
Lovely to wach the idiots coming down on their bums cos the thongs dont hold them.
No wonder people die Some have no idea whats entailed .


Cheers.



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Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 00:44

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 00:44
yes love the idiots sliding down on their bums

- I have clearly etched in my memory possibley the tidiest barely 20yo german young lady doing just that and ending up with her pants well down giving her an appearance any builder would have been plased at with that exposed crack
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:15

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:15
surely they would be wedged up her crack?
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Reply By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:12

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 21:12
I climbed it a couple of years ago and just about wrecked myself.....I was stuffed by the time I got to the top....not one of my brighter moments.Image Could Not Be Found
AnswerID: 365109

Follow Up By: Member - Myles F (QLD) - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 09:20

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 09:20
G’day Redbakk, Good photo, I have a similar one… climbed it a couple of months ago. Just thought some may be interested to know that this shot is taken from only a bit over half way to the summit. Definitely worth the climb.
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Follow Up By: HGMonaro - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:11

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:11
yes, the chain doesn't go all the way to the top, but there's a dotted white line to follow :)

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Reply By: Member - Royce- Friday, May 15, 2009 at 23:44

Friday, May 15, 2009 at 23:44
We have climbed it a few times.

Rode bikes around the base too.

Happy to leave it now as a 'done thing'.

Unless of course my grandson comes with me on a trip.....
AnswerID: 365144

Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 12:57

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 12:57
Gday,
Here are the reasons for closing the climb.

Heat - closed at 8:00am if the forecast maximum temperature for Yulara is 36 degrees centigrade or more;
Wind - closed if the estimated wind speed at 2500ft is 25 knots or more;
Storms - closed if there is any storm activity between NW and SW closer than 50km to Uluru;
Rain - closed if there is a greater than 20% chance of rain in the next 3 hours;
Lightning - closed if there is a greater than 5% chance of thunderstorms in the next 3 hours;
Cloud - closed if cloud descends to or below the summit of Uluru;
Darkness - closed from half an hour after sunset to half an hour before sunrise;
Rescue - closed during all rescue operations on Uluru.
Cultural Reasons - closed upon request from Traditional Owners following a death or due to a cultural event or ceremony occurring.

There is a chart somewhere on the internet showing what months are most likely to have closures more frequently???Ill see if I can find it and post a link.
Cheers
Hairy
AnswerID: 365216

Reply By: The Top End Explorer - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 17:18

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 17:18
Hi there!

Quite an interesting read, this Uluru - Kata Tjuta National Park Plan of Management, pretty much has alle the answers to questions visitors might have...

http://www.environment.gov.au/parks/publications/uluru/pubs/management-plan.pdf

Cheers
Anja
AnswerID: 365257

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