Driving from Glendambo west

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 21:19
ThreadID: 77185 Views:5928 Replies:10 FollowUps:32
This Thread has been Archived

Related Pages

Can anyone tell me whether I can take a rent car from Adelaide to Glendambo and west (several hundred km) without taking extra petrol? Is that westward road feasilble to travel without four wheel drive? Chances of getting bogged down due to rain or other impediments? roo collision danger at night?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 21:45

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 21:45
Hi Paul
The road west of Glendambo is a good dirt road, but where exactly do you want to travel to. The public only has access to Malbooma and from there on it is out of bounds. As for Kangaroos, they can be around any time of the day, but yes they are worse at night. Like any outback road, if it comes in yet, you are better to sit tight, as the roads will turn boggy very quickly. As for fuel, you can top up at Glendambo before you head out.

As you can see from the map below, where do you intend to go?


Cheers


Stephen
Image Could Not Be Found
Roxby Downs Special

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 410383

Reply By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 21:59

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 21:59
Stephen, thanks for this info. I am thinking to rent a Nissan Patrol which should have enough capability to go about 200km or so to the west of there. Since I have never driven in this kind of terrain I wanted to see if the road was safe (in all aspects) and how far west I could go before I would potentially run out of fuel. My plan was to take a telescope 200km west of Malbooma. Do you have any additional maps like the one you posted that would show that area?
with best regards,
Paul
AnswerID: 410385

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:16

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:16
Hi Paul
I do not want to sound like a spoil sport, but you will not get permits to travel along the railway line service track. As you can see from the next section, it clearly states no travel. Fill us in more, as there are more remote places to take a telescope.

Cheers

Stephen

Image Could Not Be Found
Roxby Downs Special

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680298

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:47

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:47
Stephen, this is unfortunate. I cannot tell exactly where the road access ends. Can you see this? I do need to go as far west as possible. If you can provide a latitude/longitude or perhaps identify on this map, I can go to Google Earth and see if I can see that location. It is relevant to my astronomical observation. I cannot go anywhere else.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680305

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:57

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:57
Hi Paul,
Where are you actually talking about. You must know the location where you want to go to, just name the place and I will bring it up on a map. As for the access road, it ends over in Western Australia. Below is another section, am I getting hotter or cold?


Cheers


Stephen

Image Could Not Be Found
Roxby Downs Special

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680306

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:59

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 22:59
Barton Siding. I dont see a way to get there without going past Lyons.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680307

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:18

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:18
Hi Paul
The Lat and Long for it are in the task bar

Cheers

Stephen

Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found
Roxby Downs Special

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680309

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 22:40

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 22:40
Check the conditions that the rental car companies place on you as the renter.

Some do not allow off road driving unless you almost buy the car off them!!

They do not want it scratched, chipped etc.

They do not allow driving on those roads between sunset and sunrise.
0
FollowupID: 680468

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 22:47

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 22:47
My misus use to drive to Tarcoola through Commonwealth Hill station in the family station wagon - had half the outback looking out for her when she left the Alice (with 3 kids) to get there.

Its quite remote and very boggy when it rains.

0
FollowupID: 680469

Reply By: Dasher Des - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:32

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:32
Paul, where you are looking to go is fairly isolated and remote. A couple of options could be to see if you could hire someone to take you there or ask on here if someone could be interested in joining you on the trip. That way you would be with company in case some thing went wrong and you required assistance.
It is quite safe travelling in the outback of Australia if you take reasonable precautions. You will not be attacked in your bed LOL (unless a wayward Dingo comes visiting) We frequently camp adjacent the side if the road if we are travelling from one point to the other and down here it is quite safe to do so.
If you go the hire option, you would be better off hiring a diesel 4x4 as it will get you further per gallon than petrol 9 We have litres here not gallons and we measure distance in Kilometers.

Hope it all works out for you.
AnswerID: 410398

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:40

Thursday, Mar 25, 2010 at 23:40
Stephen, sorry I am a bit confused. You are now saying it is possible to get to Barton Siding even if the road is closed? I will have a couple of colleagues with me in a separate vehicle. Not sure if I can rent a diesel 4x4 as the Nissan Patrol was the only vehicle quoted to me.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680313

Follow Up By: mikehzz - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 07:27

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 07:27
Plenty of diesel Nissan Patrols around.
0
FollowupID: 680341

Reply By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:06

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:06
So.......
Don't keep us in suspense ;-))

What is it exactly that you are hoping to see, that can only be seen from that particular location (through a telescope) ??

Is this a one-off occurrence?? If so, when will it occur?

:)

Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 410403

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:27

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:27
This is an eclipse of a faint star by an even fainter asteroid. Only visible in a telescope.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680320

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 23:19

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 23:19
Re: This is an eclipse of a faint star by an even fainter asteroid. Only visible in a telescope

Hey Paul, get in contact with the "Astronomical Association of South Australia"

There is a 20" 'scope available for observations - I'm sure someone will be observing (measuring) the occultation (?) if we can observe it from Adelaide.

Jeremy.
0
FollowupID: 680473

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 08:45

Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 08:45
Not much visible from Adelaide in February. But this is what happened in the sky:

Minor Planet Occultation Updates:
================================

Events of particular ease or importance below are marked: *****

Feb 1 (713) LUSCINIA: Passing just south of South Island New Zealand,
and then over Tasmania centred just north of Hobart.

***** Feb 2 (2847) PARVATI: A narrow but uncertain east-to-west path
centred just north of Wellington in New Zealand. The uncertainty area
extends north past Wanganui, and south past Nelson. In Australia the
path is centred from just south of Canberra to Adelaide. The uncertainty
area extends north past Yass and south past Wangaratta in Victoria.

Feb 2 (442) EICHSFELDIA: Beginning over Tasmania (low altitude). Then
through Western Australia passing near Leonora and Meekatharra before
ending between Carnarvon and Coral Bay.

***** Feb 3 (260) HUBERTA: An east-to-west path passing between
Christchurch and Dunedin in New Zealand. In Australia the path is
centred from just south of Sydney to Parkes, and into north east South
Australia. The uncertainty area extends north to Newcastle, and in the
south Canberra is on the edge.

Feb 3 (1364) SAFARA: A somewhat uncertain path centred directly over
Sydney, before passing near Mudgee, Gilgandra and Bourke. The path then
tracks through the Northern Territory before ending in Western Australia
near Wyndham.

Feb 3 (903) NEALLEY: An west-to-east path across south-west Western
Australia passing over Perth.

Feb 3 (502) SIGUNE: Across Western Australia from Balladonia, passing
near Leonora, and ending between Karratha and Port Hedland.

Feb 4 (1582) MARTIR: Across south-west Western Australia beginning near
Hopetoun and passing near York and ending near Cervantes. The
uncertainty area extends south past Perth, and north to Dongara.

Feb 4 (1340) YVETTE: A narrow and uncertain path across Western
Australia from Shark Bay, passing near Leonora and Madura. Then passing
near Mt Gambier and Warrnambool and into morning twilight.

Feb 4 (779) NINA: An east-to-west path across Australia beginning in
Queensland in morning twilight. The path then passes through central
Australia, before ending in Western Australia near Coral Bay.

Feb 5 (943) BEGONIA: Across Western Australia from Eucla to Eighty Mile
Beach.

Feb 5 (185) EUNIKE: A path across Australia from Western Australia
passing near Perth and Kalgoorlie, though central Australia and into
Queensland passing near Townsville and Cairns.

Feb 5 (63) AUSONIA: Along a path across northern parts of the Northern
Territory and into north Queensland in morning twilight.

Feb 6 (385) ILMATAR: Beginning near Coral Bay and Carnarvon in Western
Australia and moving south-west passing Meekatharra and Leonora, and
into morning twilight.

***** Feb 7 (12) VICTORIA: A path beginning near Port Hedland in Western
Australia. The path tracks south-east through central Western Australia
into South Australia passing near Lake Eyre. Then in NSW the path passes
over Broken Hill, Yass and ACT.

Feb 8 (189) PHTHIA: A narrow but uncertain path beginning near Sydney
and moving north-west past Newcastle and Coonabarrabran. Then into
Queensland near Charleville and Longreach, before ending near Normanton.

Feb 8 (654) ZELINDA: Passing near Adelaide (low altitude), Bendigo and
Melbourne.

Feb 10 (4) VESTA: A very wide path beginning over New Zealand in morning
twilight, between Hastings and Christchurch. Then in Australia across
the coast from just north of Rockhampton to Port Macquarie in the South.
Moving north-west over Longreach and Winton, before ending over Darwin.
Note low magnitude drop 0.04.

Feb 10 (1736) FLOIRAC: A narrow but uncertain path beginning over
northern parts of South Australia (low altitude). Then into NSW passing
near Gilgandra, Forster and Nelson Bay.

Feb 11 (715) TRANSVAALIA: Along a somewhat uncertain path passing near
Bundaberg in Queensland. The uncertainty area extends from Gladstone to
Fraser Island.

Feb 11 (362) HAVNIA: Beginning in central Western Australia near Newman
(low altitude). Moving south-east into South Australia passing near
Ceduna, Port Pirie and Adelaide, and in Victoria near Bendigo, Melbourne
and Sale.

Feb 12 (15) EUNOMIA: A path across New Zealand centred just north of
Wellington.

Feb 13 (318) MAGDALENA: An west-to-east path across Australia beginning
over Carnarvon in Western Australia. Then through central Australia and
into Queensland passing near Charleville, Maryborough and Brisbane.

Feb 14 (349) DEMBOWSKA: A highly uncertain path across Western Australia
centred from Shark Bay to Kalgoorlie, where it enters into the twilight
of the rising Sun.

Feb 15 (59) ELPIS: A path passing near Karratha and Port Hedland in
Western Australia.

***** Feb 16 (141) LUMEN: A path firstly passing over North Island New
Zealand between Rotorua and Palmerston North. Then in Australia the path
crosses the coast between Campbelltown and Bega. Moving west over
Canberra and Mildura, then in South Australia passes near Port Augusta,
and in Western Australia near Kalgoorlie, before ending between
Geraldton and Yanchep.

Feb 16 (914) PALISANA: An east-to-west path across Australia beginning
near Brisbane. The path tracks west through South Australia near Lake
Eyre, and into Western Australia near Leonora and Kalbarri.

Feb 17 (501) URHIXIDUR: Aross Australia beginning near Warrnambool and
Mt Gambier. Moving north-west passing near Adelaide and Port Lincoln. In
Western Australia near Meekatharra before ending near Carnarvon.

Feb 17 (0) 1999HG12: TNO event possibly visible from Western Australia.

Feb 18 (358) APOLLONIA: An east-to-west path passing over South Island
New Zealand between Christchurch and Oamaru. In Australia the path
passes near Sydney and Nelson. The path moves north-west passing near
Dubbo, through central Australia into Western Australia passing near
Port Hedland and Karratha.

Feb 21 (45) EUGENIA: A somewhat uncertain path passing between Carnarvon
and Broome in Western Australia. The path then moves east into central
Australia and the twilight of the rising Sun.

Feb 22 (200) DYNAMENE: Beginning near Sydney and Newcastle (low
altitude). Later the path passes over South Island New Zealand between
Christchurch and Invercargill.

Feb 22 (1390) ABASTUMANI: Across North Island New Zealand passing near
Auckland and Gisborne. The uncertainty area extends south to New
Plymouth and Palmerston North.

Feb 23 (424) GRATIA: An uncertain path across North Island New Zealand
centred near Hamilton, Rotorua and Gisborne.

Feb 23 (135) HERTHA: Beginning between Brisbane and Grafton. Moving
north-west the path passes near Charleville, through the Northern
Territory before ending near Derby and Broome in Western Australia.

Feb 23 (451) PATIENTIA: A west-to-east path between Coral Bay and
Geraldton, and moving east into morning twilight over central Western
Australia.

Feb 24 (892) SEELIGERIA: A path firstly passing across the South Island
New Zealand centred between Christchurch and Dunedin. In Australia the
path crosses the coast near Newcastle and Forster. The path then moves
north-west passing near Narrabri, then through central western
Queensland. Then into the Northern Territory ending near Darwin.

Feb 24 (895) HELIO: Across Australia beginning near Karratha and Port
Hedland in Western Australia. The path tracks eastwards through central
Australia over Alice Springs, and into Queensland between Gladstone and
Noosa Heads in morning twilight.

Feb 26 (104) KLYMENE: A path across Australia beginning between
Rockhampton and Cannonvale. The path tracks west through northern
Australia, ending over Kununurra in Western Australia.

Feb 27 (532) HERCULINA: A wide south-to-north path across Western
Australia from between Balladonia and Madura, to Port Hedland.

Feb 27 (13) EGERIA: A path beginning between Karratha and Coral Bay in
Western Australia. The path tracks south-east towards Eucla, and the
follows the coast of South Australia, southern parts of Adelaide are
within the northern uncertainty area. Then near Mt Gambier, Warrnambool
and Tasmania in morning twilight.
0
FollowupID: 680498

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 09:48

Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 09:48
Please see my "blog" the 4-May-2010 looks interesting.

Jeremy.

0
FollowupID: 680505

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 00:08

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 00:08
Jeremy, I will be there in June. Are you an active observer? If so, what equipment do you have? I will be brining a small refractor and KIWI OSD. You can see some of my activiites at http://www.eclipsetours.com/maley.html
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680623

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 01:08

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 01:08
Hi Paul,

1. I'm not an active observer but if the event appears easy I'll have a go.
I have a Takahashi TOA-150 on an EM400 mount (on my patio) and use it mainly for photographic obs.

2. There is a group who are seriously interested and do a lot of work from our observatory in South Australia - they gave me the data that I posted.

4. If you come to Adelaide please get in touch. The association has its regular meeting on the first Wednesday evening of each month and there are regular get togethers at the observatory. You are most welcome to attend.

5. The ASSA website is :http://www.assa.org.au/ you'll find out about meetings and events here.

Regards,

Jeremy
0
FollowupID: 680632

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:51

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:51
Jeremy, if I come down (depends on confirmation of funding) I will likely not be able to spend any time there since I will be on business with minimum time allotted on the ground. If this changes I will let you know. There are a number of good asteroid occultations over Australia in the month of June but the country is so big and airfare so expensive that I cannot stay for the best ones.

Those passing over SA should be well known. The only worries I will have are the likelihood of clear skies at night in mid June. Unlike the USA, it appears very difficult to travel around the area we have discussed at night and that will be crucial in terms of attempting to avoid cloud at the last minute.

Are there any good web sites that allow you to view infrared satellite images of the area on a loop basis to see where clouds are moving?

Paul
0
FollowupID: 680831

Follow Up By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:58

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:58
Paul,

Bureau of Meteorology

Regards,
Ed C

:)
Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680834

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 22:18

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 22:18
OK Paul on not being able to come to SA. June weather round Adelaide can be quite hit or miss - awful in some cases for observing. I'll see what the chaps are doing here and keep you posted FYI.

Ed C gave a good steer on the weather. For astronomical conditions (seeing transparency etc) see "Skippy sky" it gives very accurate predictions.

Jeremy.
0
FollowupID: 680840

Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:06

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:06
With all the restrictions mentioned why go from Glendambo , head out past Ceduna and turn up one of the tracks heading North until you get to the railway, that eliminates travel along the line access track.
Image Could Not Be Found

.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 410404

Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:19

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:19
You could catch the train..........

.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680317

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:28

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:28
Good alternative. Any idea how long it might take me one way from Adelaide?
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680321

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:30

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:30
What do you mean by catch the train? Where does it stop and is there hotel or car access at that point? The map above is not clear.
0
FollowupID: 680322

Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:41

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:41
The distance is 1085 Klms , Gepps Cross to Oldea, time would be 2 days, 7 hours, 41 minutes Non stop and that would be if it were a sealed road , so you can add quite a few hours on that,

I was joking when I said catch the train, although the Indian Pacific passenger train passes right by it don't stop, you'd have to bail out , No Motels out there,
Heard the saying jump the rattler, means hitching an illegal ride on a freight train in a Box Car.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680324

Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:16

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:16
Put this into Google Earth and it'll zoom you right there.

S30 31 13.9 E132 39 28.0


.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 410405

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:39

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:39
I found this location, but what is it? There appears to be only an east-west road and no roads coming up from the south. Looks perhaps like a stop along the railway but is there any infor on this place? how long to get there using transport, accommodations?
0
FollowupID: 680323

Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:58

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 00:58
That's your Barton Siding, the nearest and best accomodation will be at Ceduna, There are many minor tracks heading North from the Eyre Hwy , It still has me wondering why people rely on that OziExplorer mapping , it will not zoom in , one might as well use a paper map,
The Oldea T/o is 103 Klm West of Penong.

Image Could Not Be Found

I'm looking at your username.... are you in USA

still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680327

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:00

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:00
Yes, I am in Houston. It seems to me that it would be really difficult to manage this latter option with no obvious roads, all 4wheel drive and relying only on what we can carry, no fuel, etc. I am not geared up for that so may have to fall back on the plan to observe from Malbooma which is definitely not an optimal location.
0
FollowupID: 680328

Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:17

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:17
OK. you would most surely need a 4x4 to access that area, if you look back up the other map types , all those little brown lines are Sand Dunes, you would have to carry enough fuel (Diesel preferably) from Penong-Oldea-Penong, also plenty of drinking water, camping swags, extra spare tyres, this area is very remote, Outback of Australia, other traffic could be maybe 1 or 2 a week if your lucky.
You would have no problem with fuel, Penong-Oldea-Penong 304 mile's.
From the turn off you will have 88 mile's of unsealed track to Oldea .

Just to mention I have a very good email friend up at McKinney.

For further info you can email me

dtilley5@bigpond.com

.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 680330

Reply By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:47

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 01:47
Paul,
Would you like to shoot me an email @ > edjan AT bigpond DOT com <

Regards,
Ed C

:)
Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 410414

Reply By: Mills5 - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:59

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:59
Would be surprised if you could just head out there without a fist full of permits and a whole lot more ..was down and about that area last July and seemed that most of the roads leding off the Eyre Highway were closed to visitors , or required permits ..Try calling the Ranger at Yalata 1 800 639 413, direct for more local info and google the area there which is controlled by them ...

steve
AnswerID: 410447

Reply By: bjgard - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 16:16

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 16:16
There is a track east of Nullarbor Roadhouse to location of the old Barton siding (now deserted) a Nullarbor Roadhouse - Barton - Nullarbor Roadhouse of slightly less than 250 km . Never been on the track but maybe somebody has in recent times.
AnswerID: 410505

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 21:02

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 21:02
There is an airstrip at Barton Siding.
It is 200k as the crow flies from Ceduna. You can catch a bus to Ceduna!
A charter aircraft from Ceduna would be the cheapest way to get there.

Depending on how long you need to stay would detirmine whether you pay for the aircraft to wait, or come back later.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
AnswerID: 410558

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 21:06

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 21:06
Peter, driving from Adelaide up to Barton Siding is a nonstarter but I wonder about the cost for a charter. Any idea who I could contact about this?
Right now the best suggestion is to drive from Glendambo but I am a bit uncomfortable going so far in unfamiliar territory with minimal survival skills. We just dont have that here in Houston.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680453

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 23:09

Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 23:09
Paul, these guys are based at Ceduna.

http://australia.shopsafe.com.au/south_australia_tour/eyre_peninsula_tour/ceduna/chinta_air_tours-extended_tours.htm

I reckon driving from Glendambo will be more expensive. If I had to drive, I would be coming in from the south somewhere. Do not underestimate the remoteness of this area, as others have said.
You will have to hire a 4x4 from Adelaide or Port Augusta and choices at the latter may be limited.
There will be regular commuter flights between Adelaide International and Ceduna. The charter flying time from Ceduna to Barton Siding will only be an hour or so, but the typical minimum charter will be 4 hours, maybe 4 hours per day, depends on your negotiating skills and how busy they are.
How many nights do you need at Barton Siding?

There are a few pics here driving north from Nullarbor Roadhouse.


Cheers,
Peter

0
FollowupID: 680615

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 00:07

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 00:07
Peter, thanks for this. I am not underestimating the remoteness and sent an email inquiry to an air charter company in Adelaide. I am waiting to see if I am confirmed for funding before proceeding beyond that. Since I am flying into Adelaide there should not be an issue in cars except perhaps confirming a diesel. Right now all I could get confirmed was a Nissan Patrol.

If I chartered it would only be to remain at Barton Siding for 4-5 hours at the most assuming they can land/takeoff in the dark.
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680622

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 12:56

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 12:56
It is unlikely they will be permitted a take-off in the dark unless they arrange some flares that they can mark the strip with (and leave behind).
They will also need to have some confidence in the condition of the strip before they put down, but I expect that they will know about that.

Britz rent diesel Landcruisers with basic camping gear. There are others too.

Cheers,
Peter
0
FollowupID: 680707

Follow Up By: PaulinHoustonTexas - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:46

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 21:46
Hmm, since there is likely no population there I guess I should have expected this. Well, that would likely delete this option. Does Britz have any rental at Adelaide airport? I will go online perhaps and see what it tells me.
with best regards,
Paul
0
FollowupID: 680825

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 22:18

Sunday, Mar 28, 2010 at 22:18
Paul, I just got a little pop-up on Barton Siding when my cursor hovered over it.
It says that there is a Transfield (railways) camp there. They would come and go on trains. .....
http://www.exploroz.com/Places/40881/SA/Barton_Siding.aspx

You never know what a bit of "begging" might do for a confused Yank looking to make their spot famous......

http://www.transfield.com.au/

Good luck........

Cheers,
Peter
0
FollowupID: 680838

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)