What tools and spares have you ACTUALLY needed to use while 4WDing?

Submitted: Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:25
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When reading some articles it sounds like you need to take along your local auto repair shop, with all its tools when touring the outback. I understand how important it is to be prepared for repairs when you may be hours from anywhere. At the same time I want to temper that with the reality of what people have actually needed when traveling.

I would really appreciate feedback from those who have had to do repairs/replacements what tools and parts have you actually needed to use while away?

Thanks for your help!

OzBadDude
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Reply By: Mick O - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:32

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:32
While there is always a few things you should carry, you'd be better outlining the type of travel you intend doing. The type of tools and spares carried will be influenced by the type of travel you do and the location you intend to travel to.

ie; Up the highway to Dubbo vs 6 weeks west of Warburton (WA) on outback tracks - Your needs will be very different.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - OzBadDude - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:37

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:37
Thanks Mick,

I will be doing 7 weeks in the Kimberley. But what I am looking for is not advice about what people think I need so much as people sharing what they have actually used (or what someone they know has used).

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:05

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:05
A home made welding kit. On top of the normal tools and spares mentioned throughout the post, my homemade kit has served me well on many of my trips for both my repairs and others. Last trip we had trailer issues on several occasions. Also spring and coil issues on this and previous trips. Kit comprises simply a hand piece, earth clamp and lengths of welding cable with Battery clamps on the end (Of course I'm presuming you have a twin battery set up in your vehicle).

Cheap and easy to put together yourself, not heavy or too bulky and with a small pack of general purpose welding rods, can get you out of some real strife.






Cheers Mick


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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 09:09

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 09:09
Mick,

I like those adjustable tent poles in your first video. Easy to adjust, respond to voice command, and stow on the roof rack with just a few occy straps.
Nice.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - OzBadDude - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:47

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:47
Loved the videos!
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:46

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:46
IMHO it all depends.
How old is the vehicle ?
What brand?
What are known weak points?
How well did you prepare for the trip by checking or replacing bearings, fully servicing, changing hoses and belts if old?
In my case I had a 92 Range Rover Classic so I had the starter motor checked before going as you cannot push start an auto. I had 2 alternators on mine and one regulator did fail.
The Rover V8 is known for water pump leaks so I had one on board and I had to change it in Broome. It was only a small drip but better safe than sorry.
I also had a problem with a fuel pump which turned out to be filter material from a NSW E10 pump blocking teh inlet, but I had a spare as I had changed to a new one before that trip.
However I broke a fan in a water crossing on the OTT, and didn't have one but chopped off an opposing blade and had one sent to Cooktown. I also blew a Jumbo fuse to my rear electrics as the rear bumper dragged through the mud, but I had a spare and was able to get another in Seisia amazingly enough.

If your car is new or newish, you really don't have to take much as if you have a breakdown it will probably be something unexpected anyway.

If your car has done 160kk then you should change just about every "consumable " item before your trip, and maybe keep the old as spares if servicable.eg belt, idlers tensioner, radiator hoses, heater hoses, UJs, and have your bearings checked . if an auto have the starter motor serviced and the alternator serviced.

The above failures were over a number of trips and we were never stopped by a problem in 13 years of ownership and travel on most of the iconic roads.

PS if you have a Cruiser for sure change the radiator especially if you live in WA ( minerals in water) as I have seen 2 fail on the track and one was an OEM just one year old.
Regards
Philip A
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:03

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:03
Phil, I have been looking at a 2007 Diesel Range Rover, how reliable are they? They are cheap at the $35G mark, so that worries me some. Im thinking about a bit of comfort in my old age!! Michael
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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:05

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:05
Don’t be silly Phil, you shouldn’t be putting tap water into your radiator – whether it’s a cruiser or not.
Maybe that’s why you destroy water pumps.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:29

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:29
A 2007 Diesel Range Rover for $35K - well I would run far, as that is way way below what they would be worth - closer to $60K.

Garry
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 20:59

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 20:59
I am a bit of a "luddite " when it comes to modern cars with air suspension and electronic everything.
My concern with an RRS is what I call "contingent liability", which is the possibility of a MAJOR problem that will cost lots. Also the RRS is just a D3 in drag with half the load space so I cannot see the point.

To me a deal breaker is the 19 or 20 inch wheels with low profile tyres. One member of a club to which I belong ruined 11 tyres on an outback trip to the NT.

If the suspension fails you will not find someone to fix it outside of Darwin or Perth.

If a turbo fails THE BODY of the car must be removed from the chassis to gain access. I find this unbelievable, and I am a Land Rover tragic.
All the D3 /RRS owners rave about the pleasure of driving their cars but to me ownership is more than driving. Once out of warranty they can cost heaps. The 2.7 diesel is not rebuildable so if you have a problem below the heads , a new engine is required.

So I decided to buy a D2 diesel with coil springs. They are relatively possible to DIY if not easy as you need triple jointed wrists to get to some parts. But at least you are not hostage to a dealer if something goes wrong out of warranty, and there are no specialists around.
Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 21:02

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 21:02
BTW the only spares worth taking for an RRS are a sat phone and roadside assistance as there is very little you can do yourself unless you have an electronic device to reset things.
Even if you adjust the handbrake it needs to be reset with a dealer electronic device.
Thisis also true of my D2 , but I have bought a Nanocom which enables me to reset anything on the car.
Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 22:36

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 22:36
Michael did say Range Rover which is a completely different car to a RRS.

To the RRS there is really no more chance in it breaking down than any other make. Your point on space is more to do with the shape of the space but depends on how many people you have - certainly the D3 has better shape to it.

You can put 17" rims on the 2.7s and 18" rims on other models so tyres are not the stoppers you think.

The suspension is very simple and you take things to do repairs if the worst happens which is a bag failure which is virtually unknown. If worried take a spare and fix on the side of the road. There is a manual inflation kit if the compressor fails but changing cheap consumable parts in the compressor before you leave and carry in the spares kit - again not a big deal.

Yes if a turbo fails (and how many really fail) the body comes off - BUT it is designed for this - a few hours to take off and put back on - no skinned knuckles working in tight spots - see what has to be done to change an alternator in a LC TDV8 - probably takes longer than a turbo on a RRS.

I am not sure where you got the idea the engine is not rebuildable as most parts are available but often cheaper to just replace. Though the engine is exceptionally reliable. Other repairs are no more expensive than most other cars but there are people who will take your money if you are not wary.

Like all vehicles, you need to understand your vehicle before taking it offroad. The RRS is no different. Yes a tool to read codes is helpful - can be as cheap as a $150 scanguage for simple codes, to a $350 basic Faultmate for most things to the full on gear that dealers use.
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 10:03

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 10:03
Garry , we are both on the AULRO forum so see all the same stuff.

If the poster was referring to a Range Rover there is even more need to be careful.
As you will know from the AULRO forum almost every TD6 diesel has a auto trans failure before 160KK.
RR Front suspension failures are becoming more common and AFAIK there is no pump up fix in the field as it is an o ring failure. On a recent club trip written up in the club magazine the only L322 Range Rover on the trip had a failure before Broken Hill and could not get it fixed until Adelaide.

Quote I am not sure where you got the idea the engine is not rebuildable unquote. From the AULRO forum comments from the technicians with experience. There is a thread live at the moment regarding just this. In any case the cost of a lower end failure is approachingf $10K and these seem to be getting more common as the cars get older. Also there is the 2.7 oil pump boss failure, which I was told about by a leading specialist who now insists on replacing the boss every time the belt is changed.( at an additional cost of $700)
Not everyone is an enthusiast like you and I and willing to spend $2000 plus on new rims and tyres. The car I cited was a D4 3.0 on which the owner had actually bought 18 inch rims and still had multiple failures.
On a club trip from Sydney to Darwin last year there were 4 D3 and D4 . 3 had tyre problems with one ( the one above) with many.
One suspension deflated south of Litchfield and had to drive to Darwin on the bumpstops.
Oh I forgot the screeching and locking on parking brake. Out of 4? D3/D4s on sand driver training for my club one parking brake locked on and had to be released manually , probably then calling for a dealer visit to clean and reset.

I am not using "rumours" to cite these instances. They are actual examples from people I know.

However they still love their D3/D4s and RRSs but I personally could not afford to have such failures so I stated "contingent Liability" ie something that may not happen but has to be planned for.
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Follow Up By: ModSquad - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:44

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:44
Gents,

could you take your Range Rover/Landrover conversation elsewhere. It's not relevant to this specific thread. Start a new one by all means but the OP has asked a specific question about "tools".

Thanks in anticipation of your consideration for the postee.


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Follow Up By: garrycol - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:18

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:18
Yes agree to some extent but my response to points raised by Phil also apply to the OP - he was after real life experiences - knowing your vehicle and understanding what is likely to play up is one of the first considerations in working out what you need to take and how to set up your vehicle. If the OP was able to address similar issues with respect to his own vehicle to what Phil raised with the RRS then he will be well on his way to working out what equipment/tools/preparation would be needed.
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Reply By: olcoolone - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:49

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:49
It's simply....... do what I do and carry a fully 708 piece tool kit because you never know who you may have to help out with it.

Seriously, we carry a smallish 1/2 and 1/4 drive socket set, big breaker bar, metric combo ring spanner set, small and large adjstable shifter, standard pliers, sidecutters, multigrips, long nose pliers, crimpers, long nose and standard visegrips, standard screw driver set and a small blade set. big hammer, center and long drift punch, flat and round file, test light, multimeter, olfa knife, hacksaw. Scope 12v soldering iron.

As for spare parts...... water, WD40, insulation tape, cloth tape, cable ties, fuel tank and radiator repair kit, fuses, crimp terminals, wire, solder, heatshrink, engine drive belt, blanking adaptors for heater hose, a few hose clamps and an assortment of screws, bolts, nuts and washers.

It all depends where you travelling, more remote stuff we carry a bit more but never any major components, like shockers, springs or a spare gearbox or engine as some do....LOL
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:26

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:26
That's roughly what we carry routinely - maybe a bit less on soft trips and a bit more when going remote. The only major additions I'd make to olcoolone's list are oils, tyre repair gear and a good compressor. If going seriously bush then it's assumed that the vehicle has been comprehensively serviced, including replacing belts and hoses, and we'd carry the old ones as spares.

Cheers

John
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Follow Up By: Member - OzBadDude - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:25

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:25
Thanks, both of you. That's helpful! Also, which of those things have you actually had to use?

OzBadDude
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 14:12

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 14:12
We've been traveling remote since sometime last century. This is the stuff we wouldn't travel without. Whether we've used it or not it will always be there. Do not try to minimise the stuff you'll need to get you home safely - much better to have it with you and not need it than to need it and not have it!

Which have we used? No idea. Most, probably all, over the past couple of decades.

Forgot to mention the first aid kit. We will always carry it, but like most of the tools and spares, we'll hope we bring it home unopened!

Cheers

John
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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:59

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 16:59
Ok..on our last outback trip I actually used...Trolley Jack..Cross Wheel Brace..chocks..
compressor..wire..tape (elec & packing)..hose clamps..cable ties..ocy straps..rope..
silicone spray..broom..brush..bucket..ladder..chamois...while not strictly tools...I would
not go without any of them. A comprehensive tool kit of spanners,pliers,hammer, screwdrivers, punch, cold chisel,hacksaw,etc etc also goes...as does cordless drill,
tyre repair kit, a container full of bolts, nuts, washers, fasteners, split pins etc etc..
then theres spare wheel nuts, bearings,grease, hoses, shackles, snatch strap, water
& fuel containers, funnel & god only knows what else.
In other words I take what experience has shown me I will need & a heap of other
stuff as well, the most important being a sense of humour...after grog, of course.:)))
cheers.....oldbaz.
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Follow Up By: Member - OzBadDude - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:26

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:26
LOL the grog of course! And used on every trip.
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Reply By: The Landy - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:18

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:18
A spare engine (when I owned a Landrover)…

Hey, I had to get at least one Landy joke in now I’m a Toyo driver….

Good weekend to all,
cheers, Baz
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:21

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:21
Don't hold back mate, let them all out and release the built up tension LOL
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:32

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:32
But with a Toyota you will need to carry a spare body as the current will be rusted out after your first water crossing.
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 20:46

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 20:46
You assume too much.
I never put tap water in my radiator only distilled water and Nulon Longlife every 2 years. before my last trip in the Classic I had the radiator rodded after 11years of service and it was still clean inside and there was NO corrosion in the engine after 240kk.

However I suspect that the Karratha Toyota dealer used Karratha tap water in the Land Cruiser radiator that failed after 1 year. I do not know about my friend in Perth whose 80 series radiator died at about 130KK. The point is that Land Cruiser OEM radiators seem to be poor quality from that sample. I must admit that I was envious that the radiator was the only problem he had, although he never took it off the bitumin.
Regards Philip A

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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 22:55

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 22:55
Hi Phil or Rangiephil– I assume you are addressing me, but who knows?.
I was being polite using the term silly.
Your quote “PS if you have a Cruiser for sure change the radiator especially if you live in WA ( minerals in water) “
Change the radiator? Using tap water? – What are you on about? How long have you been 4WDriving?
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 10:21

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 10:21
Dennis, I cannot understand your aggression. Am I insulting the Toyota religion.

I think any person competent in English would understand that this was in the context of "If your car has done 160kk then you should change just about every "consumable " item before your trip". If I owned a Land Cruiser with 160KK with the original radiator I personally would have it rodded before any long trip and I would suggest that there would be few that would still be servicable.

My experience suggests to me that Toyota radiators are susceptible to damage from poor quality water , as IMHO a failure of a replacement OEM radiator in 12 months was exceptional and something I had not seen before.
The failure was a tube corroding through which is nearly always caused by mineral blocking and the radiator was replaced by the Karratha Toyota dealer.Karratha and many other WA areas have very heavy mineralisation in their tap water , and I do not trust dealers to use distilled water.
I guess I haven't seen everything as I have only been 4WD for 40 years in about 10 countries.

Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: ModSquad - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:48

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:48
As per squad post in the thread above...enough. The responses to Baz's thread are not relevant to the topic. Please confine it to the topic at hand.

Many thanks

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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:52

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:52
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Chit Chat Rule .

Forum Moderation Team
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:15

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:15
My apologies to the original poster. It was a simple question to a non member so I can't MM him. Sorry about that! Michael
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:40

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:40
"I would really appreciate feedback from those who have had to do repairs/replacements what tools and parts have you actually needed to use while away?"

Here goes for ACTUALLY this year over 30,000 outback km:

Socket set & extensions
shifters
phillips head screwdrivers
regular screwdrivers
12 V drill & bits incl pyramid shaped bit from 2-50 mm
mash hammer
ball pein hammer
cross wheel brace
screw jack
high-lift jack
scissor jack
blocks of wood
electrical tape
fuses
electrical wire
wire strippers
wire crimpers
Multimeter
100 mph tape
10 g soft wire
wire cutters
large fencing pliers
long handled post hole shovel
bastard file
tyre plugs
spare leaf spring set
suspension U bolts, nuts & fish plate
ratchet straps for tensioning stuff while suspension repairs effected
(year before - wheel studs & nuts)
air compressor & hose & tyre gauge
assortment of self tappers, bolts, nuts, screws

Maybe more but it's all in the past, now!

Cheers

RM

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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:44

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 17:44
AND

multigrips
open ended spanners
ring spanners
hose clamps
WD-40
drift/punch
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 08:42

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 08:42
WOW!

That's a huge list! You actually used all of that in 30,000km?

For similar KM's this year, I used;

* standard vehicle jack once (blown tyre near Timber Creek)

* standard wheel brace once (re the above)

* Phillips head driver to replace a 7 pin trailer plug I lost near Oodnadatta (replacement bought in Alice Springs)

* Cable ties constantly (rocks hitting them on dirt roads & snapping them)

* soldering iron twice to repair electrics in CT

* crimping tool & wire stripper twice - to replace Anderson Plugs that I lost on rough dirt roads (replacements bought at Tibooburra & Innamincka)

That's all I can think of.

Like most, I carry heaps more, but that's all I've really had to use.
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Reply By: Herbal - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:18

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 18:18
As others have pointed out...Your question is really open.

I have driven around Australia twice...Well 3/4 of it twice. The ONLY thing that ever happen to me to slow me down or stop me...Was once a stud broke loose on the trailer which caused the other studs to rattle free. So I spent 2 days waiting for the local mechanic to get back from a "local" call out, so he could show me where his bolts where cos his other staff were not allowed in his workshop...And the only other thing I can remember is that the heat of the desert roads is not good for 10 inch boat trailer tyres :)....But I do have a photo of my boat complete with it's 10 inch wheels in front of "the" rock to prove it can be done :)

There are plenty of threads that suggest what to carry as a basic kit...I have even posted to them myself.

No disrespect...But mate, if you are going to base your basic tool kit around what other people have needed to use, then you WILL be carrying a complete auto repair shop with you.

Carry a basic kit which includes basic tools suited for your rig. Anything that happens, that cannot be fixed with a basic kit, will mean you will be waiting for help.

You are better off carrying a basic "survival" kit than a full on "repair anything kit"...A basic first aid kit (check that all contents are in date). Make sure you know how to use everything in the first aid kit BEFORE you need to use it ! Carry at minimum 2 litres of water per person per day and 2 days water per person (if you expect a 3 day trip, carry 6 days water). Canned food...It does not need added water and you can (cuz pun) eat it from the can without cooking...DO NOT forget the can opener!!

Again, no disrespect. If you really are thinking of going into country where you are not 100% sure about what to carry...might I suggest an EPIRB
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Follow Up By: Member - OzBadDude - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:34

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 13:34
Thanks for your suggestions. I do have an EPIRB.
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Reply By: SDG - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:23

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:23
I carry the usual tools, but to date apart from sockets and screw drivers I have mostly used a pair of pliers.
My battery brackets broke once, so pliers and fenceing wire held battery in place.
A mate punched a hole in his exhaust. Coke can wrapped around exhaust with wire solved this problem.
Another mate who visits this site, somehow broke his rear axle on his cruiser on a trip to Cape York. He wedged a large stick under the rear, again with the help of wire, and slowly drove to the next town using his front wheels as drive wheels, and the large stick acting as a skid.

I have seen stockings used as a tempory fan belt.
Tape used to hold parts together.
etc
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Reply By: Warren B - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:48

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:48
Hi mate, I'm on 4wd number 14 and my tool kit isn't large but has been put together over 35years you get to know what spares etc to take. My truck is always as good as I can get it before a trip, be that weekend in high country or corner country.
The one thing I have chucked out is the high lift jack, carted that bloody thing all over the place for donkeys years and used it twice, once as a portable winch ( on my small 4wd ) and once to change rear wheel, gave that up to dangerous and used the bottle jack.
Cheers Warren
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:58

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 19:58
Agree about the hi lift jack, mine stays at home and have never regretted leaving it there, hydraulic bottle jack has been very handy though
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 23:23

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 at 23:23
Know a bloke - a farmer - who was told by his father (also a farmer) that all you need is:

Shifter
hammer
Pliers
cold chisel

because if you can't fix it with these tools ya dunno what your'e doing and should leave it to others

!!

Cheers
RM
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:21

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 12:21
What size shifter was that Rick? ??
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:07

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:07
Big shifter

or

Metric shifter

Ha ha
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Reply By: mikehzz - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 08:19

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 08:19
I've got a Jeep AND a Land Rover, both with nearly 200k on the clock. I've been out to the centre deserts 5 times in the last 5 years (Landy 3 times, Jeep twice), and haven't used a tool yet. I'm the biggest tool in the car.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:53

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 11:53
Regardless of the vehicle make, it sounds like you've practiced the "6 P" principle, something I swear by. On any trip accidents and mishaps can still happen (and do) but;

Prior Preparation Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.


;-)

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: mikehzz - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 20:07

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 20:07
Well the Landy did half let me down in July this year, but no tools were involved. I had a bad mud incident on the track through Warburton Crossing. The mud set rock solid and wrecked an ABS sensor leaving me without ABS, Terrain Response, Cruise Control and Stability Control. I actually had to steer the thing.... The nearest Star Fleet base was Adelaide so I just drove it back to Sydney with every warning light on the Star Ship console flashing. To its credit, the warp drive was still operational. Back in Sydney I had to wait 3 weeks for a new sensor from Star Fleet headquarters in the UK.
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Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:42

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 13:42
Apart from all the stuff above.

In my experience the biggest killer of my 2 4wd's has been corrugations & mulga. Loose roof rack, snapped roof rack brackets, fractured brand new fuel tank, snapped exhaust bracket, torn CV boot, collapsed leaf spring shackle, broken spotties and stuff I couldn't have repaired if I tried as a specialist part was needed (ABS sensor).

Fencing wire was my friend with the roof rack and exhaust plus some very large pipe clamps. Busted CV joint boot used canvas, 100 mile an hour tape and cable ties (worked a treat).

Also now take spare master in line fuse assembly after frying one in my Terracan.

I have the usual spanner kits, both socket and ring and most of the kit is worthless on my vehicles as most sockets/spanners are either to big or to small but they come with the kit so the whole kit goes in the car.

Big fan of a good selection of nuts, bolts, washers and screws. Small to big and big I mean tow bar sized nut, bolt and washer.

Also pack a selection of silicons, glues etc to fix radiators, tanks, windscreens or what ever.

Oh yes a spare fuel cap. AND if you have any speciality type nuts such as anti theft wheel nuts or the nuts they use on Rhino racks make sure you pack the appropriate tool.
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

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AnswerID: 521172

Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 14:06

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 14:06
I always carry and always seem to be delving into - one small toolbox sliding drawer full of all those small items that you always need in a workshop - pipe fittings, hose clamps, lengths of fuel hose, RTV/gasket cement, fuses, nuts & bolts, screws - several wheel, exhaust and other useful studs - electrical small parts, electrical tapes of several types, a can of penetrant and lubricant, cable ties, tie-wire, some electrical wire - and anti-seize, for when you have to unscrew the item again in the future!

For tools - besides all the basic tools - a battery operated drill (along with a cobalt drill set) that can be run off the car battery - and a set of high quality, broken stud and screw extractors (Proto or Ridgid), are highly important items, that I never go bush without.

I've always been accused of carrying too much - but I've never been stuck, and I've assisted plenty of others, who were less well prepared.
AnswerID: 521175

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 21:28

Saturday, Nov 09, 2013 at 21:28
Ron,
You sound like a man after my own heart. I too carry a heap of "non specific" odds and ends. Bloody marvelous what you can cobble together with fencing wire, zip ties, duct tape, nuts and bolts and a fair helping of imagination.

A helping of your favourite brew, whether that be tea or something a bit stronger always helps to make the problem look manageable.

Cheers
Pop
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FollowupID: 801857

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 11:15

Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 11:15
OBD,

I like to carry as much "stuff" as the tools to fit the "stuff".

Duct tape, zippy ties and fencing wire are mandatory, and are what I've used over the past few years. On a variety of 75, 79 & 105 series Landcruisers, over the past 10-15 years, these are some of the dramas:

Loose or missing brake caliper mounting bolts,
Broken, cracked lower mounting point on axle, for front shockie,
Worn shockie bushes,
Missing lower mount bolt-rear shockie,
Broken nipple on one of fuel changeover solenoids,
Damaged fr & rear pinion seals, caused by picking up fence wire on driveshafts,
Damaged brake lines, wire damage, or worn flexible lines,
Leaking, or bent steering damper,
Seized up rear shockies, due to aggressive stone damage(more prone on mono shocks),
Broken fan belts, usually one belt initially,
Stones caught in disc brakes,
Leaking rear transfer case seal,
Missing fuel, and oil filler cap,
Burnt out fusible link,
Battery clamp loose, and resultant damage to cables, acid spills etc,
Loose bullbar mounting bolts, etc etc etc.

As long as you adhere to Mick's 6P's, then a lot of the above could be avoided. Some ring/open-Enders, sockets, pliers, screwdrivers, multigrips and vice-grips are all handy. If you've got the room, tools like circling pliers and easi-outs can be useful.

Bob.

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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AnswerID: 521209

Reply By: BFreer - Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 21:16

Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 21:16
not a bad idea to take a spare key - a real bummer if little Johnny drops them down the long-drop. Best to have it taped underneath somewhere that you can get to. If the key is a chip type that a doesn't like exposure to water and mud, then get a blank cut, tape that underneath so that you can open the door, and carry a proper key in the glove box or wherever.
AnswerID: 521234

Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 22:04

Sunday, Nov 10, 2013 at 22:04
Good idea,
I knew a guy once who had his spare key taped in the engine compartment.

He had a length of "coat hanger wire" linked to the bonnent opener and the other end was accessible underneath the engine in a discrete location. If he wanted to get the key he would get under the engine pull the wire and the bonnet would open.

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.
"Outback Yonder"


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FollowupID: 801907

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 09:42

Monday, Nov 11, 2013 at 09:42
A few have mentioned fencing wire - I prefer stainless steel wire as it is easier to work with and can be twisted without breaking (some would use terms like tensile, ductile etc)

The other consumables are tape, electrical wire, solder, tyre plugs (dog turds) and U need it. Fuses, belts, filters. Spare fluids - ATF, oil, brake fluid.

Pliers, a few spanners and screw drivers. My forte is electronics so I have meter, soldering iron etc

Focus on the systems whose failure is more likely, and will stop your progress if they do fail - the cooling system, tyres, the electrical system. Replace locking wheel nuts before you travel.

Know how to over ride your engine immobilizer.

Bob
AnswerID: 521249

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